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10

Your choice of Romanization will depend on your target audience. In my opinion, your absolute safest bet is to go with strict Hepburn style. If it's for Japanese people, feel free to use kunrei. This is what Japanese people learn when they are kids, and many write their names that way. They learn Hepburn in English classes in junior high school. If it's ...


5

When talking about shi (and absence of si), to say "there is no si but shi in Japanese" is not really correct. The truth would rather be "there is no distinction between si and shi in Japanese". In other words, there is only one such "voiceless sibilant" phoneme in Japanese, which is usually written as /s/, and さしすせそ are phonemically parsed as /sa si su se ...


1

As explained by @nkjt, the Hepburn romanization aims at representing Japanese kana with Latin letters, which (in their English pronunciation) mimic the Japanese pronunciation as close as possible. This results in the irregularities in the サ行 (si ⇔ shi) and タ行 (ti ⇔ chi, tsu ⇔ tu). Most input systems try to provide maximum compatibility for both ワープロローマ字 ...


7

Systems of romanisation which were originally intended to render Japanese in a way that makes it easier for foreigners to pronounce, like Hepburn, will use "shi" and "chi" because those are closer to the correct pronunciation. Other systems, like Kunreisiki, will use "si" and "ti" instead. Which is used where is partly down to what the purpose is - Hepburn ...


2

Technically there is no right or wrong way to spell kana in roman characters. In your Japanese studies you are sure to see just about every combination there is. Just learn to get used to them, and choose the one you like when writing. Personally, "ti" for ち irks me to no end, but technically it's "valid".


0

The sungoi is most likely due to the Tokyo nasal g accent. In Tokyo, oftentimes when there is a "g-" sound in the middle of a word, they'll add in a subtle "n" right before it. They'll probably still write it as sugoi because that's what they're saying, just with an accent. This i have learned from my time on WaniKani because one of the people they use for ...



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