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4

ない can be repeated many times for emphasis (ie. ないないないない… ≒ No, no, no, no, no...) even in ordinary conversations, and it just means "absolutely no/impossible" regardless of whether the number is even or odd. つまんないない is certainly ungrammatical in everyday writings, but since it's a song, I think this just means つまんない (boring), emphasized in a peculiar way ...


3

Actually, what "つまんないないんだよ" means is not clear, mainly because... it's ungrammatical. If you want to put "つまんない(boring)" into a negative by adding ない, the correct way is to inflect the first "ない", um, accordingly, so that you get "つまんなくない(not boring)". Assuming this goof is all intentional, which it most likely is, just the songwriter playing around with ...


1

I’m comfortable with the lyrics, "If I die tonight" being followed by the second verse, "live it up" as translated in English. But I’m uncomfortable with the Japanese wording, “楽しめよ” coming after “If I die tonight.” It doesn't make sense. “楽しめよ” is an imperative form of “楽しむ,” meaning “enjoy (the life, game, sports, journey, drinking, you name it).” How ...


5

Seems to be the imperative-form verb 楽{たの}しめ together with the particle よ. 楽しめ 楽{たの}しむ is the original verb, which means "to enjoy oneself". 楽{たの}しめ, the imperative form, is formed by changing む to め. Imperative-form verbs are blunt, and are used in emergencies, in commands, to be rude, etc. Thus 楽{たの}しめ roughly means "Enjoy yourself!" (As a command). ...



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