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18

Writing the lyrics this way allows the artist to convey an extra bit of the ulterior meaning. To use the first example, where 希望 is sung as ゆめ, we can assume that ゆめ was chosen because it fit well with the surrounding syllables. But ゆめ by itself isn't specific: it could be an abstract dream of what one wants to do or accomplish, or it could be the sort of ...


15

They're contracted from かけちゃおう and つないじゃおう, which are colloquial versions of 駆{か}けてしまおう and 繋{つな}いでしまおう, "let's run" and "lets connect", in this case 手を繋ぐ, "hold hands" The auxiliary verb しまう usually means "do something accidentally", but in this case in the volitional form, it's used to express carefreeness. 手を繋いじゃおう Let's hold hands (and not care ...


9

It is common in songs, and it is not specific to children’s songs. In the first case, the pitch of the lyric line is probably something like: し(G) ら(G) ん(G) ぷ(G) り(G) を(F#) し(G) た(E) っ(F#) て(D) but if you try to sing this as it is, there is a problem: gemination is not a sound but just a pause, and you cannot sing it with any pitch. Therefore, the ...


9

From an interview with Kyary Pamyu Pamyu: ──まず伺いたいんですが、「にんじゃりばんばん」ってどういう意味なんでしょうか? 私も中田(ヤスタカ)さんに「どういう意味なんですか?」って聞いたんですけど、「俺にもわからない」って言ってました(笑)。だから正解はたぶん誰にもわかんないと思います。 My quick translation: Q. First I want to ask, what does "にんじゃりばんばん" mean? A. I also asked Mr. Nakata (Nakata Yasutaka, the person who wrote and produced the song) what it means ...


8

At the risk of going slightly off-topic, I'm going to agree 100% with Kentaro and say that putting the demonstrative determiner (learned a new term today!) in the middle sounds more literary. But there are cases where you can (and indeed must) use this "literary" form in everyday Japanese to avoid ambiguity. Take the following examples: 絵を描いたあの子供 (...


8

what is the effect that the artist is trying to achieve? The reason they often use complex kanji and ateji is quite simple, they might think it's cool. Have you ever thought everyone find yourself greater than other people if you'd known a lot of complex words and idioms? People who've written this kind of lyrics will say "To express our delicate and ...


8

コンダラ is a slangy word for a man-powered "land roller" to flatten the grounds, like this one. Although the "correct" name of this tool is "(整地【せいち】)ローラー" or something, there are a few high school students who actually call this コンダラ. Even Japanese Wikipedia has the entry for コンダラ. Yes, I'm only half kidding. What is really said in that song is "思い込んだら" (...


8

Well, it appears to me that you're confused with the transitivity of 止まる. While the English word "stop" is used both transitively (as in "I stopped the taxi.") and intransitively (as in "Then the taxi stopped."), 止まる is always intransitive. The transitive version is 止める, and its potential form is 止められる. So 俺は止まらない just means "I don't stop" or "I will never ...


7

First of all this isn't a translation, just an explanation, so excuse the result not sounding pretty: ただ会いたくて 声も無くしそうで "I wanted to meet you so much that I felt I might lose my voice," でも会えなくて 夢さえ恨んだ "But unable to (meet you), I (ended up) hating even my dreams." (I would guess this hating dreams would refer to hating dreaming about being together in ...


7

In late middle Japanese, the actual class of い-adjectives was in fact subdivided into 2 classes, namely ク-adjectives and シク-adjectives. There is remnant of those adjectives even now, though there are mainly to be found in novels or songs in order to add a touch of old. Here, we have 懐かしき, it is the old 連体形 (the base you should use to modify a noun or clause)...


6

In this case, I believe that ったって is a reduction of 言ったって, which combined with なんて likely means roughly "no matter what I say/you say/etc."


6

Songs are poetry; poets work hard to get exactly the feeling they want from the reader/hearer. Since kanji have semantic values to them, with readings that fluctuate anyway, this happens pretty often. I guess here it gives the feeling of a dream which is a hope, not just a vision seen while sleeping. You'll find videogame/anime/manga stuff that has an ...


6

かけちゃお = かけてしまおう つないじゃお = つないでしまおう


6

I think you are right in saying 君がくれたもの doesn't have to be a physical object. It could be life experiences, an understanding of things, etc. The common thread seems to be that these are things that can be kept. On the other hand, 君がくれたこと would, I think, often be understood as 'the fact that you gave to me' ('the fact of your giving to me'). 君が教えてくれたこと '...


6

I believe よなも is 世な面, meaning roughly "the surface of the world". Here's how it breaks down: よ is 世 (world) な is the archaic case particle な, which is the same as the modern particle の も is 面 (surface), a word derived from おも (the お is elided) The case particle な is rare in modern Japanese. It's preserved in several words: 眼(まなこ=[目]{ま}な[子]{こ}, ...


6

I might say but even if I wound up knowing everything, what should I do then? My reasons for this different suggestion are two-fold. しまう is a "helping verb" that means "wind up" or "end up" どうすればいい does literally mean "what would be good to do", but generally "what should I do?"


6

I do not know this song, but from reading the lyrics, I agree that the 跳び箱 (the vault used in gymnastics) is used metaphorically to refer to an obstacle. As far as I know, 跳び箱 is not commonly used figuratively to mean obstacles, but lyrics are not restricted to use only established expressions. Moreover, if it were used literally, it would mean that the ...


5

Not hugely confident in this answer, but I'll try. The gemination is supposed to be accomplished by a glottal stop in speech, and singing with a glottal stop is awkward at best and would sound strange even done properly. I imagine that the vowel lengthening is done to fill in a mora for rhythm/time purposes, and to indicate the omission. (That is, I know ...


5

It's quite common on Japanese Songs, because they want to express the meaning more precisely at lyrics. 未来 - future (which mean - will forever ...) あす - tomorrow (using "future" when singing will be overact or over.. something, so they pronounce it as あす) also same for 希望 (hope, for long ), ゆめ (a dream - a short timed)


5

You will often find this in songs as well as many Japanese manga's. If you watched ef (the anime), you will see this technique used exclusively. It is done for artistic purposes just like you said. It is also to give reader a deeper meaning behind the word that it is used on. In your case the sentence is meant to be pronounced 君がゆめに変わってゆく but the presence ...


5

This shows up even in regular writing (i.e. not lyrics to a song). There's no cultural reason for it, it's more just a way for the writer to express two different things at the same time. The author might have a string of kanji written out but the furigana might end up being some foreign word in katakana or even in the Latin alphabet. For example, I've seen ...


5

I'd have to say the answer is "no". Removing で would totally change the meaning from "to not be" to "to not exist": 約束もなくて: "there is also no 約束" 約束でもなくて: "it is neither a 約束" It is talking about a subject (which I couldn't determine) which: are not (human) words (described by 言葉じゃなく), and have no rules or fate (約束もなく). I'm inclined to think it's more ...


5

First example: Your misunderstanding as Earthling points out Second example: Ending a sentence with a noun or noun phrase, which is very common in Japanese poetry or lyrics Third example: Grammatically correct, though it uses the techniques like inversion of the word order and ending a sentence with a noun I think, generally speaking, Japanese language, ...


5

I think it might be the 連用形 of 為す, so that the meaning is roughly 八紘を宇となし make the whole world our home Also, ん is most likely む, which carries the meaning of ~う・~よう, giving 正しき平和打ちたてん let us establish true peace



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