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6

I do not believe there would be a word that everyone could agree upon as the word 「イケメン」 itself is pretty new. If you are looking for a new word, we have 「イケジョ」 even though it is not wide-spread yet. More common (and traditional) words include: [美人]{びじん}、[美女]{びじょ}、べっぴん、べっぴんさん, etc. All are safe choices. 「かわいこちゃん」(with only one い) was a very common word ...


3

Because it just means "good looking / handsome man" the female version will be 美人 (bijin) meaning "pretty women". Maybe your also interested into the fairly newly created words デキ女 (dekijo) and デキ男 (dekidan) for a more characterwise coolness in the sense of someone who is successful f.e. in job.


3

鬼畜米英 is somewhat famous even today as a slogan, and this is what most of Japanese people learn in history classes at school. But this phrase is obviously too long for everyday use, and there seems to be little evidence that this was widely used in speech during the war. Other shorter derogatory nicknames I know include アメ公【こう】 and 米鬼【べいき】. In particular, ...


3

broccoli forest pretty much answered it in the comments. The sentence example provided also is fairly self explanatory. It's "or" and "if" not separated by a space (and for some reason the "I" is a lower case "L"). The "or" really doesn't need to be there. "If" by it itself is a common term used in parody short story writing, though I think it's still ...


10

We can find several patterns in these derivations: Long words are often clipped: ハーモニー   → ハーモ スターバックス → スターバ サボタージュ  → サボ Long vowels (with ー) and geminate consonants (with ッ) are shortened: グーグル    → ググル コピー     → コピ ハーモ     → ハモ スターバ    → スタバ パニック    → パニク If final ル is already present, it is reanalyzed as る: ググル     → ググる ...


3

I assume what you need is a joking expression which looks affirmative, but actually works as a sign of disbelief. I couldn't think of an exact equivalent, but there are several ways to express sarcasm in a similar situation. Please note that the followings are kind of net-slang-y or nerdy rather than simply slangy. I honestly recommend refraining from using ...


3

If somebody calls other one ~~奴, I'll assume the referent is the speaker's close (often the same-sex) friend, or someone has frictions with him/her, or s/he is casually mentioning an unspecified person. There's no gender restrictions anyway. As an aside, 奴 can colloquially refer things whose names are unclear to the speaker or hearer, in this case it's even ...


4

Yes, I've heard 奴 used to refer to females before. Of course, it is more frequently used to refer to males. But remember that the rules of grammar and convention are not so strict in casual, colloquial conversation (which is typically where 奴 is used to refer to anyone). Although I've never heard a female refer to herself as 奴 before, I've heard college-age ...



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