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26

Thanks to @Chocolate, I was able to learn what this word means, which is roughly that something was funny. Here are a couple sources: http://wikiwiki.jp/himoteplus/?%C1%F0%C0%B8%A4%A8%A4%BF http://www.logsoku.com/r/livejupiter/1340676537/ Why does it mean something was funny? Well, as discussed in this question, strings of w (such as wwwwww) express ...


24

While sawa's answer does cover the basic construction rules, it's definitely worth it to go over the different use cases of わけ. Grab a comfy chair and your favorite beverage, because this is a long one. The best and most complete analysis I've found of this use of わけ is in this 2001 paper by Atsuko Yokota: 文末【ぶんまつ】表現【ひょうげん】「わけだ」の用法【ようほう】 : ...


18

I believe the following theory, but I have never tried to back them up with an evidence: It originates from a slang 中坊 (ちゅうぼう). It means “junior high student,” but often with an indication that the speaker looks down on the student he/she is talking about. (The usual word for “junior high student” is 中学生.) On a BBS, calling someone 中坊 would be just ...


14

They derive from 笑う(わらう). They're the Japanese equivalent of "LOL".


14

It's not clear exactly who or what started it on twitter, but なう does indeed come from the English "now". It became popular in 2009, shortly after the release of twitter (according to this site). Here are some Japanese articles exploring the usage: http://nanapi.jp/258/ http://zokugo-dict.com/21na/nau.htm http://www.paradisearmy.com/doujin/pasok_now.htm


14

「[働]{はたら}きたくにゃい」 is just a cute way of saying 「働きたくない」. It makes you sound like a kitten speaking.


13

っつ (sometimes つう) is a slang version of という (or an alternate version like といった, depending on the context). It's extremely informal. 冗談【じょうだん】だっつの。 (=冗談だ【じょうだん】といったの。) I said I was joking. [Idiomatically: Chill out, I was just kidding.] 彼【かれ】はやめたいっつってんだから、やめさせてやりゃいいじゃん。 (=彼【かれ】はやめたいといっているんだから、やめさせてやればいいじゃない。) He's saying he wants to quit, so why not ...


11

That's called 語呂合わせ and you could find full article at Wikipedia. Quoted from Wikepedia 1 : いち、い、ひとつ、ひと 2 : に、ふたつ、ふた、ふ、つ(英語から)、じ 3 : さん、さ、みっつ、みつ、み 4 : よん、よ、よっつ、し、ふぉ(英語から)、ほ 5 : ご、こ、い、いつつ、いつ 6 : ろく、ろ、むっつ、むつ、む 7 : しち、ななつ、なな、な 8 : はち、は、ぱあ、やっつ、やつ、や、やあ 9 : きゅう、きゅ、く、ここのつ、ここの、こ 0 : ...


10

KY is short form of 空気読めない (Kuuki Yomenai)


10

In Edo-speak (江戸言葉) or rough speak in present Japanese, a sequence of a vowel followed by a high vowel is often contracted to one long vowel. こまけー's original form is [細]{こま}かい 'detailed'. In this case, it is claiming that the other person cares too much about subtle things. There are other patterns as well: ai → ee,   [高]{たか}い → たけえ ei → ee,   ...


10

In colloquial speech, 「あるある」 is basically a way to respond to questions like "Have you ever noticed how the more busy Jack gets, the more he sweats". あるある means something like "Yeah, I recognize that situation" or "Yeah, I've been thinking about that too" or "Yeah, I have noticed that". One meaning of ネタ is 'humorous material' or 'joke material'. There's a ...


9

It sounds like this person is suffering from hallucination, or he is reading an avant‐garde poem. Can't pick all. phirru's comment on the audio is overall wrong. It may be a political protest, but there are parts that are clearly not serious, like うなぎの遊園地. まだ済んでねえんだよ。[...] 馬鹿野郎が。あ?青山の御本堂。うなぎの遊園地。檻から散歩してんのか?ケンジタカノ。等々力で御長女がそうして[...]したんだよ。なー。何のあれしたんだよ? ...


9

The word is kire-ru. Like most 下一段, it naturally derives from the 下二段 verb kir-u. It is properly written 切れる. Consider the word 途切れる. You may think of it as "堪えていた気持ちが途切れて, and now I'm pissed". As for why it may be written as キレる: it is slang, and the katakana emphasizes this. The final -ru conjugates, so leaving it in hiragana is most natural. Also note ...


9

わけ is a noun meaning 'reason', but it might be better translated as 'circumstances' as Matt comments. When you put it at the end of a sentence, you are turning that sentence into an appositive clause modifying that noun. When the predicate is an adjectival noun (also called na-adjective), you need to change the ending into the adnominal ending (-な). The ...


9

No, there isn't. You will have to think of an alternative. For example: 仕事の話をする AさんとBさんはいつも仕事の話ばかりする A and B are always talking shop (talking about work). 専門の話をする この2人が専門の話をしている These two are talking shop.


9

Perhaps this site may be of use to you. For each section there is a brief description and explanation of the choice of symbols/characters used. The characters used for kaomoji may represent: Eyes (usually obvious)(may be covered by arms/hand) Ears (may be absent) Nose (may be absent) Mouth ( ∀ and ▽ in your examples are mouths) Limits of the face ...


8

Basically 浮く (うく) means to float, but has many other meanings. When used for a person or an action of a person, 浮く can mean “being out of place,” “not belonging to the place he/she is,” “being the odd one out,” and “not being able to interact with others well.” For example: 田中さんは会社で浮いている。 (たなかさんはかいしゃでういている。) Mr. (Ms.) Tanaka is out of place in his (her) ...


8

I do not know if 凄い (すごい) is slang or not, so I will skip that part. The word has an interesting origin. Daijirin explains the original meaning of the word as follows: 心に強い衝撃を受けて、ぞっと身にしみるさまの意が原義。平安時代から見える語で、良い意味でも悪い意味でも用いられた。近代以降、心理的圧迫感を伴わない用法が生じた I do not think that I can translate this accurately to English, but anyway here is my attempt: The ...


8

As you say, ねー is a (very) informal, rather masculine, way of replacing ない at the end of words. Works for both verbs: 行かない → 行かねー and い-adjectives (which are kind-of-verbs anyway, but let's not get into that debate here): 危ない【あぶない】→ アブねー in fact it also works with other "-a" kanas. E.g: ヤバい → ヤベー Adding のだ/んだ as you do in your example is only ...


8

I hear 「まだ見ていない。」, which seems entirely normal, comparable to the English construction "I still haven't seen it." => "I'm in a still-continuing state of not seeing it." I suppose there's some element of volition here; it's still possible for her to see it if she wants to. For example, if a pterodactyl flew overhead, and you missed seeing it, you would say ...


8

www is Internet slang like lol in Japanese. It stands for warai (笑い), often used on online message boards 笑 is like www, it's another internet slang, like lol in Japanese. You will also see people adding 笑 at the end of sentences on the Internet just like the example you gave.


8

It is an onomatopoeia, not the name for an object unless the author/speaker uses it as such for his own aesthetic purposes but this would be fairly rare. It describes the way a long object dangles, stretches, lies down, etc. in a lazy manner. The long object coud actually be anything from linguini to a cat stretching its body, from hair to stretching ...


8

The ん negative ending is a contraction of sorts of classical negative ending ぬ, precursor to modern ない. It's still pretty common. As illustration of this, the Microsoft IME gives 食べん as a valid conversion option after typing in taben, or 飲まん for noman. Note that する with the negative ん is not しん, but instead せん, as again the negative ん is from classical ぬ, ...


7

アメテ! is baby speech for やめて! (Stop it!).


7

I haven't talked to my lesbian friend in a long time, but I'll offer some words from my memory and from "Japanese Street Slang," by Peter Constantine. レズ - This corresponds to the English dyke, or lesbian. I think it has more of a "dyke" butch feel to it than just plain old lesbian. おたち - "The Japanese equivalent of 'bull dyke', used in lesbian circles, ...


7

It's standard, normal Japanese. どう = how; だ = the copula. "How would it be if you showed me even one courtesy, Sir Knight." But it really means, "How about a little manners here?".


7

Perhaps you are assuming that 野郎 has a wide variery of levels of politeness, and that they are continuous, but they are not. Probably, 野郎 is not used in isolation as an insult word. When it is an insult word, it is used in one of the few fixed expressions like この野郎 and 馬鹿野郎. Also, when used in isolation, a meaning of an insult word or a counterpart of ...


7

The なう that you hear in the Bus announcements is actually "なお" meaning "furthermore" or "in addition". If I recall correctly, it is often used in the part of the announcement that is describing the locations near the next stop.


7

I've taught すごい to friends as their first or second word too, it's very useful. I wouldn't say that it means "cool" though, more like "wow!". You can't use it to say "a cool guy". On its own as exclamation it means "cool" (like when you're looking at some great scenery). It's a little informal when used on it's own like that. You can definitely use it in a ...


7

According to this explanation, 女子力{じょしりょく} refers to a woman's prowess with issues like fashion, make up, and style. Which would be considerably different from the English "girl power", which is about a woman's particular ability to succeed in all realms of life, and implies women's ability to be just as good, if not better, than men.



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