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18

There's the prefix 子{こ}- 'child', sometimes spelled 仔:  猫(ねこ)  →  子猫(こねこ)  'kitten'  牛(うし)  →  子牛(こうし)  'calf'  狐(きつね) →  子狐(こぎつね) 'kit'  羊(ひつじ) →  子羊(こひつじ) 'lamb'  豚(ぶた)  →  子豚(こぶた)  'piglet'  犬(いぬ)  →  子犬(こいぬ)  'pup'  鹿(しか)  →  子鹿(こじか)  'fawn'  馬(うま)  →  子馬(こうま)  'foal' It doesn't work for every word, though. 小鳥{ことり} is 'small bird', ...


13

舒适区 is totally unfamiliar to Japanese. I don't even know what the first two kanjis are. Anyway, if you want to emphasize the negative aspect of "comfort zone" and want to say "the place you can't stay forever", a good word for both of your examples is 「ぬるま湯【ゆ】」 (literally "tepid water"). ぬるま湯につかる = stay safe, avoid challenge, lack vitality The trip is ...


11

ポケットティッシュ is the generic term for those tissue packs. As far as I know, there is no one word for "ポケットティッシュ for promotion". Manufacturers of those tissue packs seem to call them: [販促]{はんそく}用の(ポケット)ティッシュ (販促 = abbreviation for 販売促進 (sales promotion)) [宣伝]{せんでん}用の(ポケット)ティッシュ プロモーション用の(ポケット)ティッシュ Edit: Everyone knows those promotional tissue packs, so in ...


10

You can get a lot of mileage out of prefixing the names of animals with 子【こ】-, which functions as a diminutive. For example, "kitten" is 子猫【こねこ】; "puppy" is 子犬【こいぬ】; "piglet" is 子豚【こぶた】. This also works for foxes - the best way to say "kit" is 子狐【こぎつね】.


10

I think the closest word would be 本命, although the meaning might be a bit different. 本命 refers to the person the women is confessing her love by giving him chocolate at Valentine. It's probably close to the English word "Crush", although it is implied that the woman is actively trying to get together with him. As for the phrase Won't you be my ...


10

I think you can try: リンクを開{ひら}く リンクを開{あ}ける リンクをたどる (follow the link) リンクをクリックする (click the link) サイトを訪れる (visit a site) Of course don't forget to conjugate them into the required requesting/commanding forms.


9

いな is an archaic form of 'no' (sometimes written with kanji as 否). You can still hear it in modern Japanese in a few phrases, like ~か否か ('whether or not ~'). いいな is, of course, いい+な, i.e. 'that's good'.


9

You can use ガーデニングする (do gardening) for gardening. ガーデニング is a generally used term in today's Japan. So you can say... 趣味の一つとして、ガーデニングを始めた。 (As one of my hobby, I started gardening.) ガーデニング用品を買う。 (Buy tools for gardening.) 子供と一緒にガーデニングした。(I gardened with my children.) If you don't prefer this word, you can use [園芸]{えんげい}する (do gardening) alternatively. ...


8

I don't think "read between the lines" accurately conveys the intended meaning of 空気{くうき}を読{よ}む. Reading between the lines is usually if you are given a specific phrase, written or spoken, and you are expected to understand an implied, and intended, meaning that is not directly stated. Whereas reading the air, as far as I know, is about understanding a ...


8

「フレーミングミス」? In normal conversation you'd say 「(足が)切れてる。」or「(頭が)切れちゃった」.


8

The term 画期的 in its definition refers to an event so momentous that it heralds the start of a new age (時代). The term epoch making, from what I can tell, appears to exist in Japanese as エポックメイキング, which might be why that English definition is attached to it. Indeed, in English such an event could be described as 'epoch making.' But it's metaphorical in ...


7

Yes, it is. Other variants are 追, and direct use of the English P.S. The most common format is 追伸 xxxxxx at the very end of the letter after name and date. When handwriting, it is common to indent further lines to match the start of the text, like so: 追伸 xxxxxxxx (line 1)    xxxxxxxx (line 2) These are more style guidelines than rules as sawa ...


7

I think that 面白い is actually much closer to "funny" than most learners realise, because they think of 面白い as "interesting". It often means "funny", e.g. アキちゃんはちょうおもしろいよね Aki is really funny. Another way of saying "that's really funny", which hasn't been mentioned, is (ちょう)うける


6

It is usually called 「おまけカット」. When it consists of bloopers, it is called 「[NG集]{エヌジーしゅう}」.


6

Your sentence is grammatically correct. について is a good way to say "about" in many situations. However, in this case I think it would be more natural to say 今、東京から京都まで行く方法を調べています。 I'm [ looking up / reading about ] how to get from Tokyo to Kyoto. 調べる is often translated to "investigate, examine", but it's a very common word and I think "look up, read ...


6

Those are most commonly called 「[屋台村]{やたいむら}」, followed probably by 「[屋台街]{やたいがい}」, but I recommend that you stick with the former because the latter can also refer to a regular street lined with food stalls. There is one named 「かごっまふるさと屋台村」 in Kagoshima if that is the one you got drunk at last night. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=keCZt91Xj1g The word ...


5

Valentine's Day has a slightly different importance in Japan than what I am used to in Europe. In Japan, the act of giving chocolate for Valentine's Day has spread to all areas of life, in particular to the workplace. You (are expected to) give chocolate to your boss and your colleagues with the slight twist that only women give chocolate only to men. (The ...


5

I think the following come closest when you realize something you didn't anticipate (or at least you pretend not to have anticipated, e.g. when you are being polite): (あぁ) そっか Of course! I never noticed! when you had confirmed something you did anticipate: やっぱりね Of course! I knew it!


5

Given that the word is constructed out of the Japanese language, it would be an understandable mistake to think the word was Japanese. However, "flyjin" is not a Japanese word. The word "flyjin" was coined within the English speaking foreign community in Japan, where the issue of people leaving Japan after the earthquake was a topic of much discussion. ...


5

In addition to knjname's answer, you can use 庭いじりする for gardening. (Literally it means to play with the garden.) 庭いじり is a very common word for casual hobby gardening. ( http://matome.naver.jp/topic/1LwIE ) And also 庭仕事する is common for gardening. (Literally it means to work on the garden, but doesn't necessarily mean working as a job.) 築庭する sounds like ...


4

First to deal with the Japanese language related question as to whether we could use 交番 to refer old British telephone boxes: As a result of the discussion on these pages I would say yes because although there seem to have many types of British police boxes, they were on the whole very similar in function to the 交番 to be found in Japan. A Japanese 交番 is ...


4

I don't really like to bring up the subject of anime or manga as an example, yet the first character that came to my mind was 夜神 月(ライト) from "Death Note". There is a subculture that has made many references to the character's name such as ライト signifying 光/正 due to his intelligence and sense of justice. As well as 神 indicating that he acts in the way a god ...


4

I use the jargon word (ダーティ)ハック! Simple and direct. You could also say something like 適当な解決方法、適当なやり方


4

You've basically answered your question - the words you've listed are your options. There's pretty much nothing closer to the English word 'funny' than those words; and if there was a more direct translation, it would be unusual enough of a word that it would sound too strange to use in everyday conversation. I'd say to default to 面白い - it would mean ...


4

Just ~を見てください is possible, I think. Also, some slightly politer forms that you might see around: ~をご覧{らん}ください (please see) ~をご参考{さんこう}ください (please refer to)


4

This decorative frame can be called 飾り罫 (かざりけい). 飾り罫 can be text-based or not, it means any kind of dingbat-style framing in general.



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