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1

「[性]{しょう}に[合]{あ}う」 means "to be congenial", "to suit one's taste", etc. 「性に合わない」 means the opposite of that. It would, however, be pretty awkward if one tried to translate literally 「性に合う合わない」 in OP's sentence. Note that the 「の」 in 「というの」 nominalizes 「性に合う合わない」. I would simply use "congeniality" without hesitation for the whole 「性に合う合わないというの」 part ...


2

[性]{しょう}に[合]{あ}う means "fit your preference/style" and [性]{しょう}に[合]{あ}わない means "doesn't fit your preference/style". So [性]{しょう}に[合]{あ}う[合]{あ}わない means "fit your preference/style or not". The whole sentence means "Even you understand you need people skill from now on, there is a thing to fit your style or not."


4

There's no implicit order which word you should use for stacking sections. You can (basically) freely choose linking words for you additional sections. A non-exhaustive list is: 次{つぎ}に, 更{さら}に(は), そして, それから, その上{うえ}(に), この上{うえ}(に), 加{くわ}えて, それに加{くわ}え(て), 他{ほか}に(も), また, 並{なら}びに, および, それだけでなく, のみならず etc. etc. Variations for "firstly" and "finally" are: ...


7

You can't ✗ "pay the drinks" ✗ 飲み物を払う in English either, even though you can ○ "pay the bill" ○ 勘定を払う ○ "pay the rent" ○ 家賃を払う ○ "pay attention" ○ 注意を払う In other words, 「〜を払う」 corresponds more closely to "to pay ~" than "to pay for ~", which should not be surprising considering that is the syntactic equivalent. As to why ...


8

The short answer is "because Japanese speakers will it to be that way." The pedagogical answer is that 払う operates on お金, not the thing you're paying for. This is exactly the same as in English. You don't "pay drinks." You pay for drinks. Drinks are not the direct object in English or Japanese. The money is the direct object, so you follow it with を. If ...



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