Tag Info

New answers tagged

8

I believe [無駄足]{むだあし} is derived from [無駄足]{むだあし}を[運]{はこ}ぶ ("move one's feet in vain"), which is one of a series of counterintuitive idioms Japanese vocabulary has. [小腹]{こばら}が[減]{へ}る "little stomach get empty" actually describing "be a little hungry" (cf. [腹]{はら}が[減]{へ}る "be hungry") [大]{おお}ぼらを[吹]{ふ}く "blow on a big conch" actually, "blow on a conch ...


0

せっかく insinuates that some type of work or hardship has been endured (by someone) or there is some type of importance happening. What happened before the line could have relevance, but the beauty of it is that infers a lot even without. (Perhaps they came a long way to the store. Or maybe they are just in need of sweaters [or whatever the article in question ...


3

I'm guessing the phrase you're referring to is 無理しないでください and its variants. For example, you'd say this when you make a request of someone and realize that it might be a large undertaking or inconvenience, and you want to express that the person you are asking doesn't need to go to such troubles for your sake. More generally, you would use this phrase when ...


0

Because translating a whole sentence is prohibited here (in what I understand), instead I will leave some fragments of words below. So, please try putting them together into a sentence. ~てみる = try to ~ / start by ~ing まとめる = to summarize こと = things ~なければならない = have to / must やる = to do (almost equivalent to する) [必]{かなら}ず = invariably / without ...


0

If I understand your question, you just don't know usage of ~~してみた . ~~してみた is very popular on internet recently, you could find ダンスしてみた, 歌ってみた. this form can be converted into した, so まとめてみた is simply まとめた, summarized. してみた makes past verb and also has nuance of tried to do, but personally I think the nuance is "tried, but less effort. actually i enjoyed." ...



Top 50 recent answers are included