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Question ①:"I have been trying for ages to understand the reason という is used so frequently." Question ②:"What does という add to the sentence and what connotations does it have in Japanese?" Question ③:If you were forced to name who it is doing the いう'ing, would it be the speaker, Japanese society or just some abstract entity? Question ④:What does ...


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今日のテーマは愛という事だ。 It implies like either speaker or listener mentioned or discussed about something related to 愛 whereas 今日のテーマは愛だ only implies the fact both speaker and listener know that they will talk about 愛. 彼が金を貸してくれたということは私は彼に信用されているということだ。 You can translate both 彼が金を貸してくれたということ and 彼が金を貸してくれたこと as "the fact that he lent me some money." Although, ...


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I feel your pain...but I think I'm able to answer this. First, let's quickly review relative clauses. From Niwasaburoo: [Nを] 私が買った辞書, which would be the relative clause version of 私が辞書を買った。 [Nに] 私が日本語を教えた学生 ⇒ 私が学生に日本語を教えた。 [Nへ] 母が買い物に行ったデパート ⇒ 母が買い物にデパートへ行った。 [Nと] ×毎朝学校へ通った友達 ○毎朝いっしょに学校へ通った友達 ⇒ 毎朝いっしょに友達と学校へ通った。 So there's a lot of construction of the ...


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Japanese-Japanese dictionaries give almost complehensive lists. “Aという” originally meant “someone says A”, but its original meaning has been lost in many cases, and it is used like a 助詞. “Aということだ。” means “I heard that A.” In this sentence meaning of “say” is remaining. In other cases “Aということ” is used as a noun clause. A shorter form “Aこと” is also used, but ...



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