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14

First, 「おっしゃい」 is the imperative form of the verb 「[仰]{おっしゃ}る」」, which is the honorific form of 「[言]{い}う」. 「うそおっしゃい。」 means exactly the opposite of what it means literally. It always means "Don't lie (to me)!" A more common form is: 「うそつけ!」, which also literally means "Tell a lie!", actually means "Don't lie!" 100% of the time. The nuance of ...


13

Cross-linguistically, grammatical words like に and で are often unpredictable or idiosyncratic, and you can't always explain them logically. For example, in English, we say arrive at but not *arrive to. And we say Welcome to X but not *Welcome at X. Why? No reason. It's arbitrary. It seems like the alternatives should be just as logical, but for some ...


10

(すごく古い質問ですが、偶然見つけたので) Although the number is small, there seems to be some "英製和語" (an English word of Japanese-origin, that has a significantly different meaning from the original Japanese word): Tycoon (大君【たいくん】 in Japanese is a dated word for shogun, not a businessperson) Hibachi (Japanese 火鉢【ひばち】 is a heating device and not used for cooking) Satsuma ...


10

The most common reply among us native speakers would be a simple 「ありがとうございます。」. 「はい」 would sound pretty strange. You could say 「はい、ありがとうございます。」, though.


9

「それが人生」, while everyone will understand it, does sound pretty "translated". You will probably hear it more often in fiction than in real life. Thing is 「人生」 is a bigger word for us than "life" is for you. When we talk about an "everyday" kind of life, we use 「[生活]{せいかつ}」 or 「[暮]{く}らし」, not 「人生」. 「人生」 sounds more long-term and philosophical, which is ...


7

The word you are looking for is すなわち and should be in every dictionary. It means "therefore"/"namely".


6

If you are saying good-bye to someone to whom you have just made a request, yes, you can say 「どうぞよろしくお[願]{ねが}いいたします。それでは、[失礼]{しつれい}いたします。」  We often say EXACTLY that in business settings. Quite a few adult speakers would actually speak like that even in non-business occasions, but even for those people, the phrase would be too formal to use with close ...


6

「公園に行ったならば、何しようか?」 is unnatural, and the main reason is that 「~しよう」 means "Let's ~", referring to something someone is actually going to do right now or in the near future. Instead, expressions like 「何をしますか?」 or 「何をして/どうやって過ごしますか?」 will do. Basically this type of question is asked without any if-clause: いつも公園では何をして過ごしますか? ふだん公園ですることは何ですか? When you ...


6

会社の名前{なまえ} consists of two nouns, one describing the other. The one with の is in genitive case which is used to indicate possession in this case. It's roughly equivalent to 's or of in English: company's name or the name of the company (both are translated to 会社の名前). Note that 名前 is a native Japanese word and it uses kun-yomi reading of the kanji in this ...


6

All of them are syntactically correct, but they are semantically strange as explained below. Depending on the situation, もらう may not be polite enough. いただく will be even more polite. In the second one, 泊める is just about the night, so it is unnatural to mention 8日から9日まで, which means the whole two days (unless you are talking about both nights of 8日 and 9日, ...


6

If you are being greeted with an いらっしゃいませ, when entering a large shop, supermarket, bank etc., you are not expected to reply. If you feel you need to somehow acknowledge, a short nod would do. If you hear いらっしゃい, when entering someone's house, お邪魔します or 失礼します would be a standard answer. If you are entering a small shop and there are no other customer (so ...


5

「よい夢を」 is the normal* way of saying "Sweet dreams" not just in emails or instant messages but also in conversations or letters. As Kokoroatari says, 「よい年を」is also common, and is the normal way of wishing someone a happy new year. While it's true that it's a contraction (probably of 「よい夢をみてください」), the short version is more natural. In English, instead of ...


5

I don't think there are any call-and-response jokes in Japanese, which is sort of an important feature of knock-knock jokes. As for jokes, which follow a particular pattern, there are simple plays on words, which everyone knows and which involve two words or phrases, which are (at least quasi-)homophones, usually at the beginning and at the end of a ...


4

Both of those work with a little fixing. 何日でも泊まってもいい 泊まりたいだけ泊まってもいい or 好きなだけ泊まってもいい Hell, throw it all together and you can sound like a super welcoming friend lol. 何日でも好きなだけ泊まってくれ!


3

If you need to express your gratitude in one sentence, that is a very good one --- except, it is ありがとう, not ありかとう.


3

"Chi" is a pretty common morpheme but seldom used as a word, except in certain fossilized phrases. "Ichi" is unambiguously an independent word. So they are different in that respect. I would call it a qualitative difference; others may disagree. Whether that difference is sufficient to allow one as a Wiktionary entry but reject the other depends on ...


3

To choose between the two sentences, the first one is much better by the native standards. However, 「何ヶ日」 sounds very awkward. 「[何日]{なんにち}」 is the correct word. You can also say 「[何ヶ月]{なんかげつ}」 if you guys are talking long-term, but not 「何ヶ日」, which is probably why I, a native speaker, do not know how to read it. Your second sentence is incorrect because ...


3

The expressions that I think would retain the sarcasm are : 「[間一髪]{かんいっぱつ}。」 or 「間一髪だったね。」 「[危機一髪]{ききいっぱつ}。」 or 「危機一髪だったね。」 A slightly less natural (and more literally translated) phrase would be : 「[危機回避]{ききかいひ}したね。」


3

会社{かいしゃ}の名前{なまえ} is grammatically fine, and while compound nouns are sometimes formed by simply eliminating the の particle (e.g.,本{ほん}の棚{たな} -> 本棚{ほんだな} or 勉強{べんきょう}の不足{ふそく} -> 勉強不足{べんきょうぶそく}), in this case the word you are looking for is: 会社名{かいしゃめい} (the on-yomi of 名 is generally used in compound nouns and has the same meaning as 名前{なまえ} as a whole: name). ...


3

Just as the English "A as B" is not symmetrical, so is Japanese "BとしてのA." B is the usage/disguise. A is the object to be used. 分詞としての形容詞や副詞をよく使えば does not make sense. 形容詞や副詞としての分詞をよく使えば would be a better translation for your English sentence. However, it is unnatural to fit everything into a noun. It is far more natural to use an adverbial expression ...


2

As far as I know, there isn't a set response to いらっしゃい(ませ). Usually people don't say anything in response. You can politely acknowledge the person welcoming you in a non-linguistic manner by smiling or nodding. (I wanted to post いらっしゃいました as a joke answer, but fortunately I'm too mature to do so ;-)


2

One of the uses of the の particle (that you will learn early on in Japanese) is to show possession. "Company Name" is the same as "Company's Name". Company's Name = 会社の名前


2

Suggestion (1) sounds correct: 夢 is typically used with the verb 見る and the particles を or に: 母のことを夢に見た | I saw my mother in a dream 父に会った夢を見た | I dreamt that I met my father So, as you suggest in (1), the verb in よい夢を is probably 見る. The よい_を construction is used with other words. よい週末を comes to mind. In that case the verb would be something like ...


2

English uses specific verb forms (past subjunctive / would) to express unlikely/counterfactual conditionals. Japanese doesn't have this feature, so if you want to stress the unlikeliness, you need to express it in other ways, for example with adverbials like もし or 仮に 仮に公園に行ったならば、何する? What would you do if you went to the park? 仮に公園に行ったならば、何した? What ...


2

The particle construction ~(な)のに expresses the adversative, i.e. in English (al)though, even though, etc. The の in ~のに and ~なのに is a suffix that functions as a nominalizer. の turns any inflected expression into a noun, and なの does the some for expressions that cannot be inflected. This happens in order to make the attachment of grammatical markers possible ...


2

どういうXX here is like English "what kind of XX". It's slightly vaguer with more room for expansion, and could come across as slightly more humble or non-confrontational on the part of the speaker. In terms of rhythm and idiom, どういう状況ですか starts with どういう, immediately indicating that this is a question, rather than 状況は何ですか, where we're halfway through the ...


1

Someone asked almost the same question in Japanese here. The people that answered it there couldn't come up with any any proverbs or 四字熟語 that said that exactly, but the closest was 諦(あきら)めは心(こころ)の養生(ようせい), which kind of means 'don't worry about the things you can't change'.


1

Why all the answerers, commentators and upvoters here are hung up only on the "dictionary" usages of the phrase, I have no idea. The answerers even seem to live in Japan. In today's Japan, the phrase is OFTEN used as a casual "Hi!" as well --- if someone wants to know the fact.



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