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14

First, 「おっしゃい」 is the imperative form of the verb 「[仰]{おっしゃ}る」」, which is the honorific form of 「[言]{い}う」. 「うそおっしゃい。」 means exactly the opposite of what it means literally. It always means "Don't lie (to me)!" A more common form is: 「うそつけ!」, which also literally means "Tell a lie!", actually means "Don't lie!" 100% of the time. The nuance of ...


10

(すごく古い質問ですが、偶然見つけたので) Although the number is small, there seems to be some "英製和語" (an English word of Japanese-origin, that has a significantly different meaning from the original Japanese word): Tycoon (大君【たいくん】 in Japanese is a dated word for shogun, not a businessperson) Hibachi (Japanese 火鉢【ひばち】 is a heating device and not used for cooking) Satsuma ...


10

When you use "say" or "言う", the content of the speech is the most important. The existence of the physical sound/voice is not usually important, nor necessary. Dictionaries say so. 彼はブログで、そう言っていた。(≒彼のブログに、そう書いてあった。) On the other hand, when we use "声が出る" (intransitive) or "声を出す" (transitive), the existence of the physical sound is the most ...


9

The short answer is "because Japanese speakers will it to be that way." The pedagogical answer is that 払う operates on お金, not the thing you're paying for. This is exactly the same as in English. You don't "pay drinks." You pay for drinks. Drinks are not the direct object in English or Japanese. The money is the direct object, so you follow it with を. If ...


8

I believe [無駄足]{むだあし} is derived from [無駄足]{むだあし}を[運]{はこ}ぶ ("move one's feet in vain"), which is one of a series of counterintuitive idioms Japanese vocabulary has. [小腹]{こばら}が[減]{へ}る "little stomach get empty" actually describing "be a little hungry" (cf. [腹]{はら}が[減]{へ}る "be hungry") [大]{おお}ぼらを[吹]{ふ}く "blow on a big conch" actually, "blow on a conch ...


8

You can't ✗ "pay the drinks" ✗ 飲み物を払う in English either, even though you can ○ "pay the bill" ○ 勘定を払う ○ "pay the rent" ○ 家賃を払う ○ "pay attention" ○ 注意を払う In other words, 「〜を払う」 corresponds more closely to "to pay ~" than "to pay for ~", which should not be surprising considering that is the syntactic equivalent. As to why ...


7

引用文の終わりに、括弧に入れて (訳は筆者による) ←recommended または、(筆者訳) ← recommended (拙訳) (私訳) のように書くとよいと思います。


7

I don't have any clue to decide whether it's a parallel evolution or not, but I guess it's from Chinese, considering the phrase is attested in a famous (1st century BC) Classical Chinese literature, namely Shiji, and the fact all Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Vietnamese shares the similar expressions. 大行不顧細謹,大禮不辭小讓。如今人方為刀俎,我為魚肉,何辭為。 The most powerful ...


7

会社の名前{なまえ} consists of two nouns, one describing the other. The one with の is in genitive case which is used to indicate possession in this case. It's roughly equivalent to 's or of in English: company's name or the name of the company (both are translated to 会社の名前). Note that 名前 is a native Japanese word and it uses kun-yomi reading of the kanji in this ...


7

The word you are looking for is すなわち and should be in every dictionary. It means "therefore"/"namely".


7

あける (明ける in kanji) here is an intransitive verb which basically means to finish, to change to a new state, etc. According to 大辞林: あける【明ける・空ける・開ける】 二(自動詞) ①夜が終わって朝になり,あたりが明るくなる。 《明》 ↔ 暮れる 「夜(よ)が-・ける」 ②時間が経過して次の新しい年・日や季節が始まる。主語を示すことはない。 《明》 ↔ 暮れる 「 - ・けて八月二日,いよいよ頂上をめざす日だ」 ③ある特別の状態の期間が終わって,普通の状態に戻る。おわる。 《明》 「長かった梅雨(つゆ)がようやく-・けた」 「喪(も)が-・ける」 ...


7

Good question. The phrase would drive me up the wall if I were a Japanese learner, too. 「[形]{かたち}」 here means "appearance". What that ultimately means is "outfit". 「[入]{はい}る」 here means "to start (learning something new)". I am sure small bilingual dictionaries could be useless with these two in this particular context. 「形から入る」 means "Someone ...


6

If you are saying good-bye to someone to whom you have just made a request, yes, you can say 「どうぞよろしくお[願]{ねが}いいたします。それでは、[失礼]{しつれい}いたします。」  We often say EXACTLY that in business settings. Quite a few adult speakers would actually speak like that even in non-business occasions, but even for those people, the phrase would be too formal to use with close ...


6

All of them are syntactically correct, but they are semantically strange as explained below. Depending on the situation, もらう may not be polite enough. いただく will be even more polite. In the second one, 泊める is just about the night, so it is unnatural to mention 8日から9日まで, which means the whole two days (unless you are talking about both nights of 8日 and 9日, ...


6

Sometimes the moral of a proverb could be vague and ambiguous. The author of this page believes that it tells people to "behave humbly", while this one argues that it means "wise people know how to let others' guard down", which is more or less faithful to what original hawks are said to do. There's also a QA forum answer gives an insight that "truly ...


6

In casual speech, you might say: A: 「なのか」ってどういう意味? B: どっちの「なのか」?「なのか、ようか」(とか(言うとき))の「なのか」?(それとも、)「なのですか」って意味の「なのか」? If you want to sound politer you might say: A: 「なのか」はどういう意味ですか? B: どっち(orどちら)の「なのか」ですか?「なのか、ようか」(など)の「なのか」ですか、それとも「なのですか」という意味の「なのか」ですか?


6

Informally, I would suggest 「みたいな」 or even just 「の」. One can say: 「みっか、よっか」みたいな「なのか」? 「みっか、よっか」の「なのか」?


5

I think 電撃 is not so strange as a translated material, but anyway... I'm afraid I don't know the standard way to assert your translation of a certain expression is correct without disclosing the original English phrase. Something like (この部分は原文を直訳したもの) might work, but that's annoying and uncommon. In general, it's a common practice to specify the original ...


5

「あえて言えば」is often used to mean a kind of weak opinions. Your sentence looks totally natural to native speakers (including me). I'll list some example sentences: あなたの提案で概ね問題ないが、あえて言えば予算が気になる。(Your proposal looks good as a whole, but I have little worry about its cost.) あえて言うほどでもありませんが、家に帰ったら手は洗った方がいい。 (This may be a needless concern, but I think you should ...


5

There's no implicit order which word you should use for stacking sections. You can (basically) freely choose linking words for you additional sections. A non-exhaustive list is: 次{つぎ}に, 更{さら}に(は), そして, それから, その上{うえ}(に), この上{うえ}(に), 加{くわ}えて, それに加{くわ}え(て), 他{ほか}に(も), また, 並{なら}びに, および, それだけでなく, のみならず etc. etc. Variations for "firstly" and "finally" are: ...


4

Japanese motion verbs utilize the particle を for both object and place the action takes place. So you can equally say: 彼を取り囲む。 周囲を取り囲む。 彼の周囲を取り囲む。 but not: × 彼を周囲を取り囲む。 (same case particle cannot be repeated in one clause) In my opinion, the 周囲を取り囲む version has slightly more "completely surrounded" nuance, but it barely matters in the usual ...


3

「[割愛]{かつあい}」 is a formal word so appropriate to use in a formal situation as suggested by eltonjohnさん. 「[飛]{と}ばす」and 「[省略]{しょうりゃく}する」 have similar meanings, but 「割愛する」 is more appropriate in this case, because 「割愛」 is formal and has a special nuance for it. While 「飛ばす」 and 「省略する」 simply mean "omit", 「割愛する」 means "I do not want to omit [this/it/etc] but now ...


3

時間の関係で1節飛ばします might be a plain expression, but... What occasion have you got in mind? Your dissertation defense, say? In that case more polite expressions will be preferable. * added * You will read your paper at a conference? Then 時{じ}間{かん}の関{かん}係{けい}で、次{じ}節{せつ}は割{かつ}愛{あい}させて戴{いただ}き、第{だい}x節{せつ}に移{うつ}ります (where "x" is the section where you are to ...


3

I'm guessing the phrase you're referring to is 無理しないでください and its variants. For example, you'd say this when you make a request of someone and realize that it might be a large undertaking or inconvenience, and you want to express that the person you are asking doesn't need to go to such troubles for your sake. More generally, you would use this phrase when ...


3

Does "as best can be predicted" mean something like "as far as one can predict" or "in the foreseeable future"? If so, I think your native speaker got it wrong. Try these instead: 予見【よけん】可能な範囲で、 予測可能な範囲で、 予測できる限り、 Xできる範囲で、X可能な限り = as far as one can do X Xできるほど = to the point where one can do X, so that one can do X So 目に見えるほど literally ...


3

Just as the English "A as B" is not symmetrical, so is Japanese "BとしてのA." B is the usage/disguise. A is the object to be used. 分詞としての形容詞や副詞をよく使えば does not make sense. 形容詞や副詞としての分詞をよく使えば would be a better translation for your English sentence. However, it is unnatural to fit everything into a noun. It is far more natural to use an adverbial expression ...


3

From what I gather, the connotation of the English phrase "Dead men tell no tales" is the latter -- "It's safe to kill everyone who knows the secret". Am I right? That's not the primary meaning of Japanese 死人に口なし, although it looks very similar. As your teacher said, this should be understood as "You can easily accuse a dead person, even unjustly, because ...


3

「[性]{しょう}に[合]{あ}う」 means "to be congenial", "to suit one's taste", etc. 「性に合わない」 means the opposite of that. It would, however, be pretty awkward if one tried to translate literally 「性に合う合わない」 in OP's sentence. Note that the 「の」 in 「というの」 nominalizes 「性に合う合わない」. I would simply use "congeniality" without hesitation for the whole 「性に合う合わないというの」 part ...


2

Chinese has 人为刀俎,我为鱼肉, which I must say matches the Vietnamese one more, and is well documented in its origins. The phrase (in chinese) is attested to Sima Qian of the Western Han dynasty, who wrote in 史記・項羽本紀: “如今人方為刀俎、我為魚肉。”, meaning "to be taken advantage of" Many thanks to China documenting its history so thoroughly. Its structure doesn't match ...



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