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11

There's two reasons. Historically, 無し (modern ない) wasn't the negative form of ある but an adjective in its own right (meaning 'absent', and valid for any subject). The negative form of ある was あらず. Naturally, these words meant mostly the same thing, and over time あらず was fully replaced (in Kantou Japanese at least) with ない, which later went on (in Kantou ...


9

The short answer is "because Japanese speakers will it to be that way." The pedagogical answer is that 払う operates on お金, not the thing you're paying for. This is exactly the same as in English. You don't "pay drinks." You pay for drinks. Drinks are not the direct object in English or Japanese. The money is the direct object, so you follow it with を. If ...


9

やりたい放題 is a bit different from other ○○放題. It's an idiomatic phrase which primarily refers to someone's tyrant-like, irresponsible, self-indulgent behavior. Because it usually has a negative connotation, it's less likely to serve as a marketing phrase (except something like this). 母親が亡くなって以降、あの王女はやりたい放題だ。 やり放題 is less common and may refer to the same ...


9

It is 「[鉄]{てつ}は[熱]{あつ}いうちに[打]{う}て」 and every Japanese-speaker would be familiar with this saying. English to Japanese: http://www.wa.commufa.jp/~anknak/ (Click where it says 「英語ことわざのABC順分類」)


9

There is an exact Japanese equivalent to "Strike while the iron is hot," that is "鉄は熱いうちに打て." I don't know whether this proverb had existed before we knew English version, or is just a translation of "Strike while the iron is hot."


8

You are correct that it is a colloquial form of というところ. It doesn't literally mean place, but perhaps you can think of it as “in that vicinity”. ってとこ is often used when you are pretty sure, but not exactly sure: Q: How heavy is that bag? A: 5kgってとこだ (I'd say 5kg) Q: Who do you think she has a crush on? A: 高木ってとこじゃないの? (I bet it's Takagi, no?) ...


8

This looks primarily like a 敬語{けいご} problem, more than a syntax or semantics problem. お使いいただく is 敬語, and 食べる does not match it at all. 食べる is neither 尊敬語 nor 謙譲語. This means that 「ご飯を食べる」 is not even polite when 私 is the one doing the eating. There are many ways to say (あなたが)食べる in 敬語: 召し上がられる お召し上がりになる (*1) お食べになる etc. (私が)食べる in 敬語: いただく ちょうだいする ...


8

Good question. The phrase would drive me up the wall if I were a Japanese learner, too. 「[形]{かたち}」 here means "appearance". What that ultimately means is "outfit". 「[入]{はい}る」 here means "to start (learning something new)". I am sure small bilingual dictionaries could be useless with these two in this particular context. 「形から入る」 means "Someone ...


8

You can't ✗ "pay the drinks" ✗ 飲み物を払う in English either, even though you can ○ "pay the bill" ○ 勘定を払う ○ "pay the rent" ○ 家賃を払う ○ "pay attention" ○ 注意を払う In other words, 「〜を払う」 corresponds more closely to "to pay ~" than "to pay for ~", which should not be surprising considering that is the syntactic equivalent. As to why ...


8

引用文の終わりに、括弧に入れて (訳は筆者による) ←recommended または、(筆者訳) ← recommended (拙訳) (私訳) のように書くとよいと思います。


8

Although 相棒 is not bad a translation for "bro" IMO, we usually don't need those friendship "pronouns" because the greeting words in Japanese are diverse enough to distinguish those nuances alone, unlike English basically has only "hi" and "hey". For example (translation is not decisive, requesting improvements seriously): やあ: "Hi!", "Hi ya!" よう: "Hey ...


7

I don't have any clue to decide whether it's a parallel evolution or not, but I guess it's from Chinese, considering the phrase is attested in a famous (1st century BC) Classical Chinese literature, namely Shiji, and the fact all Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Vietnamese shares the similar expressions. 大行不顧細謹,大禮不辭小讓。如今人方為刀俎,我為魚肉,何辭為。 The most powerful ...


7

運のツキ literally means "to have run out of luck". The ツキ refers to 尽き which means "to come to an end" (source). It means that one's good luck or fortune is over, i.e. no more good things can happen after that. It's like "being doomed". The sentence's meaning becomes something like "I was already unlucky by being born in this house" or "my fate was already ...


7

Some definitions on the net: 身も蓋もない 言葉が露骨すぎて、潤いも含みもない。 露骨すぎて情緒もない。 直接過ぎて、話の続けようがない。 So it refers to some very explicit/direct/honest expression which may sound harsh or uninteresting. Obviously it doesn't fit in the context you provided. As pointed out in the comment, that person was probably confusing the phrase with 元も子もない, which ...


6

Sometimes the moral of a proverb could be vague and ambiguous. The author of this page believes that it tells people to "behave humbly", while this one argues that it means "wise people know how to let others' guard down", which is more or less faithful to what original hawks are said to do. There's also a QA forum answer gives an insight that "truly ...


6

In casual speech, you might say: A: 「なのか」ってどういう意味? B: どっちの「なのか」?「なのか、ようか」(とか(言うとき))の「なのか」?(それとも、)「なのですか」って意味の「なのか」? If you want to sound politer you might say: A: 「なのか」はどういう意味ですか? B: どっち(orどちら)の「なのか」ですか?「なのか、ようか」(など)の「なのか」ですか、それとも「なのですか」という意味の「なのか」ですか?


6

Informally, I would suggest 「みたいな」 or even just 「の」. One can say: 「みっか、よっか」みたいな「なのか」? 「みっか、よっか」の「なのか」?


6

There's no implicit order which word you should use for stacking sections. You can (basically) freely choose linking words for your additional sections. A non-exhaustive list is: 次{つぎ}に, 更{さら}に(は), そして, それから, その上{うえ}(に), この上{うえ}(に), 加{くわ}えて, それに加{くわ}え(て), 他{ほか}に(も), また, 並{なら}びに, および, それだけでなく, のみならず etc. etc. Variations for "firstly" and "finally" are: ...


6

X as a prerequisite for Y: X is what must be done before Y. X いただいた上、Y してください。 After (and only after) doing X, do Y. X and or then Y: The order of completing X and Y is not strictly emphasized. X いただき、Y してください。 Do X, and do Y. See how (1) is asking a little more explicitly that you actually read the document before signing: ...


6

問題ない does not mean 'It's not a problem', which is what 問題じゃない would mean. You may be aware that ない is the negative form of ある, 'there is', which means that 問題ない means 'There is no problem.' Note that you can also say 問題はない.


6

There are a couple of equivalents listed on WWWJDIC. I cannot vouch that these are any common though. 「鉄は熱いうちに[鍛えよ]{きたえよ}」, a variant of the 打て version 「[善]{ぜん}は[急げ]{いそげ}」 make hay while the sun shines 「[奇貨居くべし]{きかおくべし}」 if you find something rare, buy it (i.e. don't let an opportunity slip) 「[幸運]{こううん}の[女神]{めがみ}は[前髪]{まえがみ}しかない」 opportunity only knocks ...


5

In this sentence, できる means "be formed" not "be able to do", and 地割れ is compared to "the boundary you can't cross" (because the crack is too deep to cross over) And it is okay to leave out the subject. If anything, it sounds a little odd if you put a subject in the sentence because it is obvious that the subject is her and her group of friends.


5

Yes, you can fill in any number in n 者択一, but it generally sounds too lofty, and the most common way to name it is n 択. "Multiple choice problem with n options" is often called n 択問題. By the way, "multiple choice problem" itself is 択一問題, 選択問題, or 多肢選択問題.


5

I think 電撃 is not so strange as a translated material, but anyway... I'm afraid I don't know the standard way to assert your translation of a certain expression is correct without disclosing the original English phrase. Something like (この部分は原文を直訳したもの) might work, but that's annoying and uncommon. In general, it's a common practice to specify the original ...


5

問題ない is not negating the noun (that would be 問題じゃない or 問題ではない, as you correctly noticed). Rather, it is saying 問題がない (or 問題はない), literally "there isn't a problem". I think you can safely treat 問題ない as a set phrase, rather than an ellipsis (omission) of が or は. (For example, I don't think 問題ない is particularly informal, although omissions usually are.) There ...


5

I think both of your sentences are occasionally used but the most common way of saying it is "電話番号を教えてください".


4

「[割愛]{かつあい}」 is a formal word so appropriate to use in a formal situation as suggested by eltonjohnさん. 「[飛]{と}ばす」and 「[省略]{しょうりゃく}する」 have similar meanings, but 「割愛する」 is more appropriate in this case, because 「割愛」 is formal and has a special nuance for it. While 「飛ばす」 and 「省略する」 simply mean "omit", 「割愛する」 means "I do not want to omit [this/it/etc] but now ...


4

Are each grammatically correct? Nuances aside, are there any fundamental differences in meanings? Sentences #1, #2, and #4 are grammatical and mean the same thing (unless the subject implied in #4 by the context is different from 私, of course). Sentence #3 is not grammatical. Note that 私は緊張のあまり is not a single meaningful component of a ...


4

As you stated, 「やってられないよ」=「やっていられないよ」 More informally, you will often hear: 「やってらんないよ」 or even 「やってらんねえよ」 around Kanto (therefore, in fiction as well). It would probably be better to treat a common phrase like 「やって(い)られない」 as a set phrase rather than breaking it down to understand it. It simply means "I can't stand it anymore!" You are saying ...


3

時間の関係で1節飛ばします might be a plain expression, but... What occasion have you got in mind? Your dissertation defense, say? In that case more polite expressions will be preferable. * added * You will read your paper at a conference? Then 時{じ}間{かん}の関{かん}係{けい}で、次{じ}節{せつ}は割{かつ}愛{あい}させて戴{いただ}き、第{だい}x節{せつ}に移{うつ}ります (where "x" is the section where you are to ...



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