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8

「それが人生」, while everyone will understand it, does sound pretty "translated". You will probably hear it more often in fiction than in real life. Thing is 「人生」 is a bigger word for us than "life" is for you. When we talk about an "everyday" kind of life, we use 「[生活]{せいかつ}」 or 「[暮]{く}らし」, not 「人生」. 「人生」 sounds more long-term and philosophical, which is ...


6

If you are being greeted with an いらっしゃいませ, when entering a large shop, supermarket, bank etc., you are not expected to reply. If you feel you need to somehow acknowledge, a short nod would do. If you hear いらっしゃい, when entering someone's house, お邪魔します or 失礼します would be a standard answer. If you are entering a small shop and there are no other customer (so ...


6

鬼 referring to a person often means someone who is something like an 鬼 (fierce, unrelenting, merciless, etc). It is also used as a prefix (鬼検事, for example), but in this case I think you should take it as 鬼の十則, where he is using 鬼 to describe himself/the sort of person you should become to succeed in business. 仕事の鬼 is a common phrase. Such a person may be ...


5

Yes, でしょ(う・っ)! is what many young people use (optionally prefixed with そう; but often without). I'm not sure if this usage is just among the younger generations (under 30), or extends to all ages, but I haven't often heard middle-aged or elderly people use it in the same vernacular (much like I don't often hear middle-aged/elderly people say "I know right ...


5

I'm not sure about hard and fast rules, but here's what I think: I think 心 is used when it is a natural flow, and does not involve too much deliberation and exertion of strong will. 意 involves intention and volition. 念 gives me the impression that an idea has been persisting in the person's mind and he is considering it. The short version: 心 - The ...


5

I don't think there are any call-and-response jokes in Japanese, which is sort of an important feature of knock-knock jokes. As for jokes, which follow a particular pattern, there are simple plays on words, which everyone knows and which involve two words or phrases, which are (at least quasi-)homophones, usually at the beginning and at the end of a ...


3

I think that しかも simply emphasizes what follows, whereas それどころ suggests a nuance like "and, as if that wasn't enough already ...". In your example 肉はちゃんと焼いてなかったし、しかもごはんは少なかった。 The meat wasn't cooked properly and, what's more, there was only very little rice. 肉はちゃんと焼いてなかったし、それどころかごはんは少なかった。 The meat wasn't cooked properly and, as if that wasn't ...


3

The expressions that I think would retain the sarcasm are : 「[間一髪]{かんいっぱつ}。」 or 「間一髪だったね。」 「[危機一髪]{ききいっぱつ}。」 or 「危機一髪だったね。」 A slightly less natural (and more literally translated) phrase would be : 「[危機回避]{ききかいひ}したね。」


3

To choose between the two sentences, the first one is much better by the native standards. However, 「何ヶ日」 sounds very awkward. 「[何日]{なんにち}」 is the correct word. You can also say 「[何ヶ月]{なんかげつ}」 if you guys are talking long-term, but not 「何ヶ日」, which is probably why I, a native speaker, do not know how to read it. Your second sentence is incorrect because ...


2

As far as I know, there isn't a set response to いらっしゃい(ませ). Usually people don't say anything in response. You can politely acknowledge the person welcoming you in a non-linguistic manner by smiling or nodding. (I wanted to post いらっしゃいました as a joke answer, but fortunately I'm too mature to do so ;-)


2

I guess you could go with these standbys: 失礼します。 お邪魔します。 ご迷惑をおかけいたします。 ごぶさたいたしました。 // only if you know the マスタ and not seen him for awhile If I am not with a native Japanese, I reply something like: "入ってもよろしいですか?お忙しいですか?" I have watched Tampopo (famous movie about ramen's place in Japanese culture) several times, and the customers almost always just place ...


1

Someone asked almost the same question in Japanese here. The people that answered it there couldn't come up with any any proverbs or 四字熟語 that said that exactly, but the closest was 諦(あきら)めは心(こころ)の養生(ようせい), which kind of means 'don't worry about the things you can't change'.


1

To expand on what blutorange said in the comments... Are you familiar with the grammar pattern ~したことがある which expresses having the experience of having done something? For example: 私は日本に行ったことがある = I have been to Japan. This is the negative, so: 私は道にポイ捨てしたことはない = I have never dropped litter on the street. We're talking about past experiences so I ...



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