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9

There is an exact Japanese equivalent to "Strike while the iron is hot," that is "鉄は熱いうちに打て." I don't know whether this proverb had existed before we knew English version, or is just a translation of "Strike while the iron is hot."


9

It is 「[鉄]{てつ}は[熱]{あつ}いうちに[打]{う}て」 and every Japanese-speaker would be familiar with this saying. English to Japanese: http://www.wa.commufa.jp/~anknak/ (Click where it says 「英語ことわざのABC順分類」)


6

There are a couple of equivalents listed on WWWJDIC. I cannot vouch that these are any common though. 「鉄は熱いうちに[鍛えよ]{きたえよ}」, a variant of the 打て version 「[善]{ぜん}は[急げ]{いそげ}」 make hay while the sun shines 「[奇貨居くべし]{きかおくべし}」 if you find something rare, buy it (i.e. don't let an opportunity slip) 「[幸運]{こううん}の[女神]{めがみ}は[前髪]{まえがみ}しかない」 opportunity only knocks ...


5

I think both of your sentences are occasionally used but the most common way of saying it is "電話番号を教えてください".


4

As you stated, 「やってられないよ」=「やっていられないよ」 More informally, you will often hear: 「やってらんないよ」 or even 「やってらんねえよ」 around Kanto (therefore, in fiction as well). It would probably be better to treat a common phrase like 「やって(い)られない」 as a set phrase rather than breaking it down to understand it. It simply means "I can't stand it anymore!" You are saying ...


3

あなたの電話番号は何番ですか? is a common way of asking someone’s telephone number. We don’t have distinction of singular and plural form as you know. So its direct translation would be “What (number) is your telephone number? We don’t think it’s redundant. I think 貴方の電話, 何番ですか?is passable. But “貴方の電話番号は何ですか?” sounds weird and odd to me. You can also say ...


3

「[声]{こえ}をそろえる」 in this context, means: "to say (basically) the same thing about something as others have previously said about it" or in short, "to express a similar opinion" In other situations such as multiple people singing or saying the same thing together , 「声をそろえる」 means: "to sing in unison" or "to speak in one voice" respectively. ...


2

As stated above 耳をすます is an idiom that means 'to listen carefully'. If we translate literally there is a kanji for 'ears' - '耳' and a verb 'すます' which means - 'to clear' - so if we combine these it's - 'to clear ears' which is the same as 'to listen carefully'. As for translation of 耳をすませば, it seems that すませば is a form of a verb to include 'if'. So I would ...


2

The 番 in 番号 is a part of the noun. The 番 in [何番]{なん・ばん} is a counter suffix ([助数詞]{じょ・すう・し}). Although these two 番s are same in kanji and pronunciation, their roles and nuances in a sentence are different. It's common for native Japanese speakers to use counter suffixes, even if it sounds repetitive in a sentence. For example, when someone goes to a bank ...


1

That is a strong phrase. It is often used to start accusing or fighting. "You are so rude." would be close.


1

It means: to speak in unison (with one voice). A synonym is 声を合わせる. EDIT: I think that what you said in your first comment seems to apply here. Hiroshi agrees with oneechan. Hiroshi made his opinion merge with oneechan's opinion when he says 「そうだぞ。。...」.



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