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21

Here are the results from a small poll on Facebook. Six native Japanese replied. The results can be interpreted as: Don't say anything if you don't know them (6 people) If you know them you can ask if they're okay, if they've caught a cold or have allergies: "大丈夫?", "風邪引いたの?", "花粉症なの?", or something to that effect. (2 people) There's no such phrase ...


17

The thing to keep in mind is that this isn't a ritualized situation, such as the 只今{ただいま}/お帰{かえ}り, "I'm back" / "welcome back", call and response pattern. When you come and go from the office or home, there are set patterns. This restaurant situation isn't like that. Specific to your questions, there is no usual exchange between customer and cashier when ...


14

I'd describe it best as a greeting or set phrase used after (any sort of) work has been done. It can be used in a variety of situations: at the end of any shared activity (before leaving home from work, after volunteer work, after group activities like hiking), very much in the sense of "See you..." when greeting somebody who (supposedly) is working or has ...


13

Thin it out. すいてください。 Thin out this part. このあたりを、すいてください。 I want this part this long. ここを、このくらいの[長]{なが}さにしてください。 Keep the front. [前]{まえ}[髪]{がみ}を[残]{のこ}してください。 Take about 1 centimeter off my bangs. [前]{まえ}[髪]{がみ}を1センチくらい[切]{き}ってください。 Shorten it in back by about 5 centimeters. [後]{うし}ろを5センチくらい[切]{き}ってください。 Trim a little more. もう[少]{すこ}し[切]{き}ってください。 Trim this ...


13

Cross-linguistically, grammatical words like に and で are often unpredictable or idiosyncratic, and you can't always explain them logically. For example, in English, we say arrive at but not *arrive to. And we say Welcome to X but not *Welcome at X. Why? No reason. It's arbitrary. It seems like the alternatives should be just as logical, but for some ...


13

First, 「おっしゃい」 is the imperative form of the verb 「[仰]{おっしゃ}る」」, which is the honorific form of 「[言]{い}う」. 「うそおっしゃい。」 means exactly the opposite of what it means literally. It always means "Don't lie (to me)!" A more common form is: 「うそつけ!」, which also literally means "Tell a lie!", actually means "Don't lie!" 100% of the time. The nuance of ...


12

In my understanding, Japanese normally does not interfere with other's personal stuff most of time. So, they don't use those after sneeze. But if influenza is hot during that time, they may ask "Are you ok?". And some people think that silent and unchanged facial expresssions are elegent on sneeze here, so there is some sneeze contest 「くしゃみ対決」 by ...


12

はじめ hajime is "the beginning", so はじめの日 hajime no hi should be translated as "The day of the beginning" or "The day it begun" and はじめの一歩 hajime no ippo as "The step that started it". はじめて hajimete is "for the first time", so はじめての朝 hajimete no asa would be "(My) first morning" and はじめてのあく hajimete no aku would be "My first Aku" (apparently officially "My ...


12

The sentence is classical Japanese, not modern Japanese, and should be parsed as such. I analyse it as follows: 艱難 汝を 玉に す kannan nandi-wo tama-ni su hardship thou-ACC jewel-LOC make Hardship will make you into a jewel. In classical Japanese, the subject of a main clause is usually not indicated by a particle. In a typical sentence, the main ...


12

I had learnt the difference ages ago, but ha forgotten it since. I asked my friend Chie, and she said: しなければいけない -> when you think that there's no other choice しなければならない -> when you've been told to do it, or when it's rather a burden to you. I think (as often) that looking at words can help. In the いけない proposition, you say basically that "you can't go ...


12

There is a common phrase for that. ご愁傷さまです - go shuushou sama desu For example お母上が亡くなられご愁傷さまです  I'm very sorry about your mother's death Regarding sending something, there is a special custom in Japan called こうでん「香典」 - giving money to remaining family members with the purpose of offering it to the departed soul. (Originally, this was used as an ...


12

ありがた迷惑 is not two separate words. It is one word, a compound noun. When you make a compound noun like this in Japanese, you only use the stem of the adjective. The stem of ありがたい is ありがた, so this gets added to 迷惑 and you end up with ありがた迷惑. Here are some similar examples of "adjective stem + noun" compound nouns, and the equivalent "adjective, noun" two-word ...


11

They do appear to be shortenings, but perhaps not of any particular wording. 大辞林 says they're short for sentences like the following: こんにちは is short for sentences such as 今日は御機嫌いかがですか こんばんは is short for sentences such as 今晩はよい晩です In each case, 大辞林 marks the sentence in quotes with など, implying it doesn't necessarily come from those sentences ...


11

Interesting question. The 日本国語大辞典 says that だらしない appears to be an inversion of しだらない, quite possibly a self-conscious thing like せるき for きせる (the Edo-period book Ukiyoburo explicitly claims this). The roots of しだらない are murkier. しだら has negative connotations on its own, and may come from Buddhist jargon, the mimetic しどろ, or somewhere else. But if しだら is ...


11

I've researched a bit and it seems that such expression doesn't really exist in Japanese. There is a kind of explanation for this: In the Western societies, there used to be a belief that sneezes could release one's soul, therefore putting it in danger because it could have been "captured" by lurking evil spirits; or it was believed that the mouth opened ...


11

Japanese here. I find it fine to say ありがとう for the first two, although どうも is more common. Not saying anything is perfectly acceptable. You can also nod, which is very common. When you leave the restaurant, it is common to say ごちそうさまで~す or ごちそうさまでした. If you are female, ごちそうさまでした would be more common. It is perfectly ok to leave without saying anything. ...


11

Your question is "is there a scenario when finishing with [] would be considered out of place or context?". As you noted, 宜しくお願い is similar to "Cheers" or "Regards", but the main difference is that neither of the latter are calls to action, whereas the former has more of a feeling of asking something. Accordingly, among coworkers, it's fine to use when ...


10

Like pretty much anything in Japanese, it entirely depends on context and your relation with the person you are addressing. よろしいですか? or いいですか? sound perfectly fine for most situations. If you are offering your help to someone of higher status, the kenjōgo construct させていただきます is a good start. E.g.: パソコンを見させていただけませんか お手伝いさせていただきましょうか To anybody ...


10

That's just ateji「当て字」, but they used like that because 滅茶滅茶 related with 滅茶苦茶/無茶苦茶 (muchakucha) and base word is 無茶, There is some saying that 無茶 supposed to mean お客さんにお茶を出さない。 (No o-cha?) (Don't provide tea to customer, which is unreasonable just like 無茶苦茶. But meaning from 当て字 are not suppose to be used, so above is wrong approach. There is also ...


10

俗語辞書(ぞくごじしょ) (slang dictionary) says that that word was formed because of the radio program called 社会の窓(しゃかいのまど) around 1948-1960, which tried expose anything about society/community. And people start to called zip fasteners 社会の窓, because it is a hidden place for men. Also when zip fasteners are opened in any place other than the toilet, they called it ...


10

I normally say 気をつけて when I part from someone going/traveling somewhere or going home, お大事に to someone sick/ill/injured etc., and お元気で when I part from someone who's older/superior to me, like my senpai, teacher, professor, boss... お元気で sounds more polite than 元気でね so I'd say 元気でね to my friends/coworkers/family/relatives.


10

The most common reply among us native speakers would be a simple 「ありがとうございます。」. 「はい」 would sound pretty strange. You could say 「はい、ありがとうございます。」, though.


9

Chakoshi to the rescue! (Chakoshi is a tool for searching both the Aozora and conversational Japanese corpora at Nagoya University.) A quick search for a "[noun]ん[noun]" pattern in the conversational corpus gives 262 results, most of which are what you are asking about. Broken down, there's actually not much variety in the nouns that follow ん: とき (99): ...


9

To understand what this expression means, picture a father and a son. The father is a craftsman, who spends most of his time awake at work. He's not very eloquent, and while he cares about the son, he won't really say much. The son goes through the usual juvenile process, struggling with the meaning of his life, not ready to accept the simple life of his ...


9

気をつけて: "take care", "be careful" (is more generic than the other ones, for example it can be used in 足元に気をつけて "watch your step") お大事に: "get well soon" (often said to people recovering from illness etc, literally something like "treat (yourself) with value/respect/care") お元気で: "be well/healthy", "all the best", "take care of yourself"


9

乗り切る doesn't quite fit here because it's about enduring through a hardship. With 乗り切る, wave(s) of difficulties come and go while you persevere, where as in "get over it," you need to overcome it yourself. 乗り越える, 克服する and 打ち勝つ do have the sense of actively overcoming some obstacle, and may work if you use it together with the right noun. I'll come back to ...


9

Tsuyoshi Ito already touches on the answer. Basically, 目 is used in a lot of expressions talking about your capability see something for its true self (見極める力). It can be seen in phrases and words like: 抜け目がない、目がきく、見識、目角が強い, etc. So, 目がない literally means you lack the "eyes" to see through things or see something for its true self. Which in turn became to ...


9

よろしくおねがいします can mean many things in different contexts. The phrase is often first learned as a component of introductions, and thus may be translated as "pleased to meet you" or "how do you do?" but its literal translation is "please [treat me] well/favorably." Outside of introductions you'll often hear it: When starting a new project with someone: ...


9

「それが人生」, while everyone will understand it, does sound pretty "translated". You will probably hear it more often in fiction than in real life. Thing is 「人生」 is a bigger word for us than "life" is for you. When we talk about an "everyday" kind of life, we use 「[生活]{せいかつ}」 or 「[暮]{く}らし」, not 「人生」. 「人生」 sounds more long-term and philosophical, which is ...



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