Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

It depends on what you want to say. First, の is not necessary: クリスマス休み or クリスマス休暇 よ is genderless and mostly used for slightly assertive expressions, like さ and ね. On the contrary, なあ is a masculine expression. Its feminine version is わ. But they will not be a proper replacement for よ. If you want to say "It's Christmas holiday!" (the "yay!" ...


3

Similar to what broccoli forest shared, "た-form + っけ" is a grammar structure that is used for confirmation. In English, it is similar to "~, right?". For example, you met a few people at a party but even after the introductions, there was a name that was hard to catch. In that case, you can use "お名前は何とおっしゃいましたっけ。" to prompt the person to tell you his/her ...


6

Despite how it looks, っ doesn't only double the consonant "t" but is an all-around geminator used with most of Japanese consonants. See the Wikipedia article. And for the last part 「っけ」, this page will be helpful. ProTip™: Although Wikipedia says you can't use っ with some consonants, the younger generation seems have acquired many untraditional ...


3

かな can state any degree of probability, from nearly zero to all but certain. Another important feature is that かな conveys intent of communication, thus it could imply request or desire so much as English "I wonder". This word is usually only used in non-polite sentences (in most cases, the polite counterpart is でしょうか). Down to your particular case, the ...


2

I haven't seen the show, so I'm uncertain of the context, but かな refers to "probably" in the translation. Ending a sentence with かな is a very casual way of expressing uncertainty. For example: あの人はアメリカ人かな。 I wonder if that person is an American. It's subtle, but "probably" might be a slightly too "certain" translation in this case (but again, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included