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12

Refinement is a reflection of the speaker, not the listener. While an opposing baron would use 「貴様」, a thug would use 「手前」.


10

In a word: imitation. Between couples, often men will refer to themselves as ore. A woman may refer to him (hence "you") by imitating his pronoun of choice. Often ore is not appropriate in various social situations, such as work. As such, some men may refer to themselves as boku. As a result, some people (both male and female), such as bosses (who may refer ...


8

When addressing children, first person pronouns are sometimes used as second person pronouns. This is done for different reasons, including teaching them to use personal pronouns instead of referring to themselves by name. as a convenient pronoun when you don't know the their name. Using this to address adults seems a bit strange, and I would find it ...


8

If nothing else, /teme:/ is Tokyo (shitamachi) dialect, while /kisama/ is standard Japanese. Refinement doesn't necessarily correlate with politeness; "ignorant oaf" might be considered more refined than "top bloke."


7

This is what dictionary@goo says about あなた: 対等または目下の者に対して、丁寧に、または親しみをこめていう。 妻が夫に対して、軽い敬意や親しみをこめてい。 In definition (1), it's said that あなた is used for second person who is equivalent or subordinate/inferior/junior while being polite or intimate/familiar. Definition (2) states that it can also be used between spouses to intimately call each ...


6

The alternative to これ in polite Japanese conversation is こちら (you should find it in most 初級Japanese text books on how to introduce yourself.) To implement this (borrowing Dono's answer) I would say: こちらは私の父です。 This is my father. こちらは私の両親です。These are my parents. こちらは私の友達、由美子です。This is my friend Yumiko. こちらは私のマネジャー(上司)です。This is my manager. You ...


6

For your question of how to say "you" without being rude in a context where you're not sure of the person's name or your status relationship, you can say 「そちら」. As for when to use あなた, this might seem a little odd, but think of あなた as like calling someone "dude". You use it between friends. You can say it to strangers, but only if you're trying to convey ...


5

It is usual to call them last-name+の+お母さん and last-name+の+お父さん (that means, you refer to your friend by the last-name). It is widespread to call people by their function unless you got closely acquainted with them. Both referencing and addressing the same. お母さん・お父さん basically means "my mother / my father", either in direct or figurative sense. (Update: At ...


4

You do not need anything. Just list their title and add desu. This is my dad: 父です or オヤジです。 These are my parents: 両親です。 This is my friend (female): 友達です。 This is my manager: マネジャー(上司)です。


4

I suggest you read this thread: In actual Japanese society, how often are second-person pronouns used? As I replied there, I would suggest avoiding 2nd person pronouns (including あなた) completely, unless you're absolutely sure what you're doing. As you say yourself, it's common to use the name of title of the person you're talking to, so the only trouble ...


3

This is very good question and I have faced the same issue with my parents-in-law and other family members of friends' families. Chocolate has given us an invaluable answer but to add context, I think the simplest rule to follow is "When in Rome..." or 「郷に入っては郷に従え」, and it does not make any difference whether you are in Kanto or Kansai: In other words, ...


3

Well, it actually would not be terribly common for a wife to call her husband お前 in the first place (at least in public), I think. The other way around seems perfectly believable to me though. Anyways, in trying to understand why your professor may have been upset by that, all I can guess is that she considers お前 to be so jarringly incorrect for whomever ...


3

こちらは 田中さんです。(He is Mr.Tanaka) こちらは is polite way to say he or she


2

Just intended as a small remark: the use of お前 does by no means necessarily imply domestic violence, but domestic violence does definitely imply the husband referring to the wife as お前. Maybe this puts it somewhat into perspective.


2

If you know the other party's name or title, by all means use it. Otherwise, omitting the pronoun as @dainichi suggests is the best idea, if possible. However, when you don't know the person you're talking to and you must use something, あなた is perfectly acceptable. For example, it is commonly used to refer to website visitors, or to the person filling out a ...


2

When a politician of the political party in power talks to a member of the former Government political party, he/she may say 「お宅の党の政策のつけが今こちらに周ってきているんですよ。」. It is less polite than saying 「~さんの党の政策のつけが・・・」. It sounds equal to say 「あなたの党の・・・」 here but 「お宅」 implies that the relationship between the talking person and the second person is not close and rather ...


2

What's the meaning of a phrase: 御用の向きとは? go-yō means business. It is an honorific expression. muki, in this context, means desire or wish. And towa is grammar that is being used here to express a question. "What is it that you desire?" or "What is your business?". Depending of the fuller context, you may be able to simplify this to "What can I do for ...


2

I've also seen 貴様 used between brothers. 手前 is a word one most likely wouldn't use toward a brother.


1

2 - うぬ comes from the kanji 己 (any my dictionary also shows 汝) which is a character for "self". 己 has several readings including おのれ, おの, おれ and うぬ. They mostly are used to refer to yourself, but apparently can be used vulgarly to mean "you" (in the 2nd person). My dictionary says it as "Blockhead!". I feel that any of these forms is mostly archaic ...



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