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17

True fluency is rare, and involves more than passing a standardized test. I will refer you to an answer I gave in EL&U.SE which I quoted from my treasured copy of Jack Seward's Japanese in Action. He is talking about Japanese, but I removed all the specific-language references because it's a good measure for fluency in any language. EDIT: I've just added ...


16

The short answer is: No. There isn't a single authoritative source that can tell you where each and every Kanji comes from, since the complete etymology of some Kanji remains in controversy. This is actually not at all different than the state of the etymology (= study of origin) of English words. The longer answer is more hopeful, though: there are some ...


14

http://tvfromjapan.blog.fc2.com/blog-category-21.html http://wwitv.com/television/106.htm http://multilingualbooks.com/online-tv-japanese.html http://beelinetv.com/ http://www.sonymusic.co.jp/?play_vc24&all http://www.ustream.tv/technology http://watch.squidtv.net/asia/japan.html http://tv.atcommons.com/


13

You will want: No romaji. Romaji hurts your pronunciation and is a crutch. Get something with furigana, or even better, hiragana in parentheses. Lots of example sentences. Context is invaluable in learning new words. Electronic is better. It's faster and can be used mid conversation much more easily. Plus you can write in unknown characters with a stylus. ...


12

First and foremost the JLPT does not have a speaking component. This means you may be able to recognise and understand grammar when reading or listening, but you may be unable to actually speak the language with any proficiency. This is my case exactly, I can understand far more than what I can express. Secondly, the entire test is multiple choice. Multiple ...


8

I found three fairly comprehensive lists online; each covers slightly different areas. http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Japanese/Vocabulary/Linguistics http://thejapanesepage.com/w/index.php?title=Grammatical_terms http://www.omegawiki.org/Part_of_speech/jpn


7

http://www.viki.com/ has some in a variety of languages, but many in Japanese. The subtitles are likewise available in several languages, sometimes including the transcripted original Japanese. I'm not sure how good the content is though, since I only saw ドラマ which isn't my thing. They seem to be a legitimate business with VC funding, so I don't think it's ...


7

EDICT (which is the corpus JquickTrans apparently uses) has several special dictionaries for technical terms. The "Computing/Telecomms" dictionary includes such wonderful words as: 変数設定 【へんすうせってい】 (n) variable initialization 参照渡し 【さんしょうわたし】 (n) call by reference オブジェクト[指向]{しこう}プログラミング (n) object-oriented programming


7

漢和辞典 is what you want: Shinchosha have just released a Kanji-only dictionary called: Shin'Nihongo Kanji Jiten: http://www.shinchosha.co.jp/jiten/kanjijiten/index.html that includes not only words with origins in China, but also native Japanese words that happen to be scripted in Kanji.


7

複合形容詞 appears to be the generic term for a compound adjective. http://ir.lib.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/metadb/up/kiyo/AN10281005/Hiroshima-IntStudentCenter-kiyo_16_13.pdf - this article covers the various types, and gives many examples. I don't know of any particular lists of these words, but some dictionaries allow you to do a search for words by ending (で終わる) ...


7

Yes, accents change when words are combined/conjugated/etc. I'm not sure if there are any truly sentence-level phenomena, but there is definitely more going on than just "words have the same accent all the time". The NHK dictionary does include a fair bit of information about these rules. To take your examples -- here are some answers I got from consulting ...


7

囲み文字 are derived from Edo period corporate logos called 表号 which were one of the standard ways of naming or identifying a shop (屋号). You may see in the countryside some companies identify themselves with logos that look like hats or carpenter's squares. There is a good survey of traditional logos from one town here: http://www.kokuhei.com/sa-ken/hyogo.htm ...


6

Sawa's recommendation that you borrow or rent the movies and look these things up is the best one, because I seriously doubt there's a site that would offer what you're looking for as a matter of course. However, just this once, because you caught me just at the right time, I'll just tell you what the translation is. I felt like making it an exercise of my ...


6

都道{とどう}府県{ふけん}別{べつ}名字{みょうじ}ランキング - a top 20 surname list of each prefecture published by Hiroshi Morioka, a Japanese surname researcher 同姓{どうせい}同名{どうめい}辞典{じてん} - huge rankings of Japanese names generated from telephone directories


5

Probably get this book called 新漢和大辞典(shin kanwa daijiten), 20k kanjis there. Which also include 漢字の成り立ち(How kanji formed) ref: http://www.gakken.jp/jiten/data/kanwa.html#kanwadaijiten http://www.gakken.jp/jiten/data/detail/161346/index.html


5

There are dozens of methods and approaches. Some you might have heard of are "Bushu radical decomposition", "SKIP", stroke-reading (as you directly copy the kanji). http://jisho.org/kanji/radicals/ is a pretty handy method if you're decent at decomposing kanji into radicals.


5

I can tell you that N1 is not meaning on par with a native speaker. Actually many japanese could not pass N1 with an high score without studying. That's because of many questions about grammar and kanji usage. Still the test doesn't measure your active skill (speak and write) but only your passive ones. I know people who passed N1 but are not really fluent ...


5

I'm not Japanese, but as far as I know 「むぎゅむぎゅ」depicts squeezing something softly probably more than once as Sawa pointed out. I think you can use it in relation to some texture that has elasticity. The context it is used in can be cute, but is not limited to it. For instance, you see 「むぎゅむぎゅ」used to describe how the dough of a bagel feels. However, it is ...


4

The first thing you need is a little knowledge about the radicals. If you can break a kanji down into it's radicals, you can look it up in books and electronic dictionaries. It makes it easier to understand the kanji too, since you can identify its parts. If you can name a few of them, you can often type the names into an electronic dictionary to filter ...


4

I would think it would be ok though they sometime use pronunciations that are easier for kids to understand, informal japanese, and words typically used by kids. I'm not quite sure what your level is, but watching Love (renai) dramas with japanese subtitles would be my recommendation to improve your listening. Another option is what is called Shadow ...


4

I know a children's song, かえるのうた (The Frog's Song, The Frog Song) I'm not sure if you'd classify it as a lullaby, but it has a simple melody and can even be sung in a round (I think of it as the Japanese "Row, Row, Row your Boat") Here's a link: Frog Song Note: There seems to be a regional difference where the line "Gero gero gero gero" is replaced with ...


4

Very insightful point! I think you are right that pitch matters. As a case in point, say if my daughter is reading a textbook aloud in homework and gets a pitch wrong, I would correct her, because it's noticable. On the other hand, Japanese dictionaries written for Japanese do not have the pitch information either, and people from different regions often ...


3

I have been using JquickTrans dictionary software for years (had to pay $15 before but it's freeware now), and it has a few specialized dictionary catalogs that could be useful to find science and math terms:


3

One tool for identify kanji is SKIP Codes, which were developed by Jack Halpern for his kanji dictionary. It works even if you don't quite know kanji radicals, much less the primary radical in a kanji. http://www.basic-japanese.com/Hilfsdateien/skipCode.html has some information about how to determine the skip code for a kanji. From there you need a ...


3

There are a couple things to keep in mind when looking for a dictionary: How easy is it to find what I am looking for? A given dictionary might prove to cover every single word in the Japanese language, but if you can't find what you are looking for then you will think it is just a waste of money. Your best bet here is to look for ones that are used by ...


3

http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~jwb/cgi-bin/wwwjdic.cgi?1C has many dictionaries, including some scientific ones. But you asked for print media... Computer Terms - English-Japanese / Japanese-English Dictionary of Computer and Data-Processing Terms Chemical & Science - Japanese-English Chemical Dictionary: Including a Guide to Japanese Patents and ...


3

Your Amazon links get mangled by SE, so I cannot really check what is in your rejected options (since the link below is the most obvious one, I wouldn't be too surprised if it is), but just in case: The ever reliable Japanese resource page maintained by Jim Breen offers two datasets compiled from news archive: In 1998 Alexandre Girardi produced a ...


3

The three annually revisited books: 現代用語の基礎知識, イミダス, and 知恵蔵 are particularly famous for studying the trendy words with definition/explanation. They seem to be putting things online, but some are not free. I found this one, which seems to be free. You may want to follow the 'アクセスランキング' link on it. For your purpose, a search with '現代用語' will give you good ...


3

I do not think that this is an exhaustive list, but this is what I've managed to find so far. (I shall use "H" to denote "Honorific" and "h" to denote "humble"): する なさる (H) 致す (h) 行く いらっしゃる/おいでになる (H) 参る (h) 来る いらっしゃる/おいでになる (H) 参る (h) いる いらっしゃる/おいでになる (H) おる (h) 見る ご覧になる (H) 拝見する (h) 聞く 伺う (h) 言う おっしゃる (H) 申す/申し上げる (h) ...


3

In 大辞泉 there are entries labelled 漢字項目 which sometimes give this information for on-readings (where there is separation, and it's usually not particularly clear-cut). For example, 日. Under ニチ they give five meanings with example compounds, and under ジツ they give two (out of the five given for ニチ already). So from that you can see that the meaning 日本のこと is ...



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