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17

True fluency is rare, and involves more than passing a standardized test. I will refer you to an answer I gave in EL&U.SE which I quoted from my treasured copy of Jack Seward's Japanese in Action. He is talking about Japanese, but I removed all the specific-language references because it's a good measure for fluency in any language. EDIT: I've just added ...


17

Yes.​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ http://foosoft.net/pages/kanji-frequency.html


16

The short answer is: No. There isn't a single authoritative source that can tell you where each and every Kanji comes from, since the complete etymology of some Kanji remains in controversy. This is actually not at all different than the state of the etymology (= study of origin) of English words. The longer answer is more hopeful, though: there are some ...


14

You will want: No romaji. Romaji hurts your pronunciation and is a crutch. Get something with furigana, or even better, hiragana in parentheses. Lots of example sentences. Context is invaluable in learning new words. Electronic is better. It's faster and can be used mid conversation much more easily. Plus you can write in unknown characters with a stylus. ...


14

http://tvfromjapan.blog.fc2.com/blog-category-21.html http://wwitv.com/television/106.htm http://multilingualbooks.com/online-tv-japanese.html http://beelinetv.com/ http://www.sonymusic.co.jp/?play_vc24&all http://www.ustream.tv/technology http://watch.squidtv.net/asia/japan.html http://tv.atcommons.com/


12

First and foremost the JLPT does not have a speaking component. This means you may be able to recognise and understand grammar when reading or listening, but you may be unable to actually speak the language with any proficiency. This is my case exactly, I can understand far more than what I can express. Secondly, the entire test is multiple choice. Multiple ...


12

The main issue you're going to run into is explained in this answer, specifically: Avoid learning from manga until you're at a level where you can make the difference between what you hear and what you can say. In spite of this, there is a rough guideline you can use to determine which anime you might be able to use to learn even basic ...


9

I found three fairly comprehensive lists online; each covers slightly different areas. http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Japanese/Vocabulary/Linguistics http://thejapanesepage.com/w/index.php?title=Grammatical_terms http://www.omegawiki.org/Part_of_speech/jpn


8

It's strange that no one mentioned that WWWJDIC provides the audio clips for the reading for all the entries (rintaun only mentioned about the pronunciation hiragana). In case anyone misses it (I didn't realize the blue button is a play sound button until later), here is where:


7

Google Japan sells the Japanese version of "Google Ngram". Here is the site. http://www.gsk.or.jp/catalog/GSK2007-C/catalog.html But it says only in Japanese. There might be the same one in English, though. I hope it helps.


7

複合形容詞 appears to be the generic term for a compound adjective. http://ir.lib.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/metadb/up/kiyo/AN10281005/Hiroshima-IntStudentCenter-kiyo_16_13.pdf - this article covers the various types, and gives many examples. I don't know of any particular lists of these words, but some dictionaries allow you to do a search for words by ending (で終わる) ...


7

http://www.viki.com/ has some in a variety of languages, but many in Japanese. The subtitles are likewise available in several languages, sometimes including the transcripted original Japanese. I'm not sure how good the content is though, since I only saw ドラマ which isn't my thing. They seem to be a legitimate business with VC funding, so I don't think it's ...


7

漢和辞典 is what you want: Shinchosha have just released a Kanji-only dictionary called: Shin'Nihongo Kanji Jiten: http://www.shinchosha.co.jp/jiten/kanjijiten/index.html that includes not only words with origins in China, but also native Japanese words that happen to be scripted in Kanji.


7

Yes, accents change when words are combined/conjugated/etc. I'm not sure if there are any truly sentence-level phenomena, but there is definitely more going on than just "words have the same accent all the time". The NHK dictionary does include a fair bit of information about these rules. To take your examples -- here are some answers I got from consulting ...


7

EDICT (which is the corpus JquickTrans apparently uses) has several special dictionaries for technical terms. The "Computing/Telecomms" dictionary includes such wonderful words as: 変数設定 【へんすうせってい】 (n) variable initialization 参照渡し 【さんしょうわたし】 (n) call by reference オブジェクト[指向]{しこう}プログラミング (n) object-oriented programming


7

囲み文字 are derived from Edo period corporate logos called 表号 which were one of the standard ways of naming or identifying a shop (屋号). You may see in the countryside some companies identify themselves with logos that look like hats or carpenter's squares. There is a good survey of traditional logos from one town here: http://www.kokuhei.com/sa-ken/hyogo.htm ...


7

No, it is not. The Japanese use the Chinese Buddhist canon, which is written in classical Chinese. They read the texts using go-on readings throughout. There are of course translations into Japanese, just as there are into English, but they are only meant for study, not for ritual use, and are not considered canonical.


6

都道{とどう}府県{ふけん}別{べつ}名字{みょうじ}ランキング - a top 20 surname list of each prefecture published by Hiroshi Morioka, a Japanese surname researcher 同姓{どうせい}同名{どうめい}辞典{じてん} - huge rankings of Japanese names generated from telephone directories


6

Sawa's recommendation that you borrow or rent the movies and look these things up is the best one, because I seriously doubt there's a site that would offer what you're looking for as a matter of course. However, just this once, because you caught me just at the right time, I'll just tell you what the translation is. I felt like making it an exercise of my ...


5

I can tell you that N1 is not meaning on par with a native speaker. Actually many japanese could not pass N1 with an high score without studying. That's because of many questions about grammar and kanji usage. Still the test doesn't measure your active skill (speak and write) but only your passive ones. I know people who passed N1 but are not really fluent ...


5

If you have a Nintendo DS then 漢字そのまま楽引辞典 (Kanji Sonomama Rakubiki Jiten) is a great tool. It accepts kanji and kana entry via the touchscreen, and includes a JP->EN dictionary, a EN->JP dictionary, and a JP->JP dictionary.


5

There are dozens of methods and approaches. Some you might have heard of are "Bushu radical decomposition", "SKIP", stroke-reading (as you directly copy the kanji). http://jisho.org/kanji/radicals/ is a pretty handy method if you're decent at decomposing kanji into radicals.


5

I'm not Japanese, but as far as I know 「むぎゅむぎゅ」depicts squeezing something softly probably more than once as Sawa pointed out. I think you can use it in relation to some texture that has elasticity. The context it is used in can be cute, but is not limited to it. For instance, you see 「むぎゅむぎゅ」used to describe how the dough of a bagel feels. However, it is ...


5

Probably get this book called 新漢和大辞典(shin kanwa daijiten), 20k kanjis there. Which also include 漢字の成り立ち(How kanji formed) ref: http://www.gakken.jp/jiten/data/kanwa.html#kanwadaijiten http://www.gakken.jp/jiten/data/detail/161346/index.html


4

Very insightful point! I think you are right that pitch matters. As a case in point, say if my daughter is reading a textbook aloud in homework and gets a pitch wrong, I would correct her, because it's noticable. On the other hand, Japanese dictionaries written for Japanese do not have the pitch information either, and people from different regions often ...


4

There are a couple things to keep in mind when looking for a dictionary: How easy is it to find what I am looking for? A given dictionary might prove to cover every single word in the Japanese language, but if you can't find what you are looking for then you will think it is just a waste of money. Your best bet here is to look for ones that are used by ...


4

One such resource for haiku is Wikisource's collection of Matsuo Basho's Haiku. There are also quite a few pre-modern poetry anthologies transcribed at the University of Virginia's Japanese Text Initiative, including a transcription of the Ogura Hyakunin Isshu (a collection of 100 waka poems by 100 different authors). The original Japanese poetry is all in ...


4

The first thing you need is a little knowledge about the radicals. If you can break a kanji down into it's radicals, you can look it up in books and electronic dictionaries. It makes it easier to understand the kanji too, since you can identify its parts. If you can name a few of them, you can often type the names into an electronic dictionary to filter ...


4

I know a children's song, かえるのうた (The Frog's Song, The Frog Song) I'm not sure if you'd classify it as a lullaby, but it has a simple melody and can even be sung in a round (I think of it as the Japanese "Row, Row, Row your Boat") Here's a link: Frog Song Note: There seems to be a regional difference where the line "Gero gero gero gero" is replaced with ...


4

If you forgive the shameless self-promotion, I’ve put together this simple tool to compare a few different kanji etymology websites. You quickly find out that there are lots of disagreement. http://namakajiri.net/kanjigen



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