Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

I know very little about Aikido and can only explain general facts about the Japanese language. “Tori” and “dori” in these example are the noun form of the verb toru (取る; take, grab). In isolation, this noun form is read as “tori.” Both Katate Tori and Katate Dori are compound words made of katate (片手; one hand) and tori. However, in Japanese, the first ...


14

The phenomenon that the beginning of the first consonant of the latter component of a compound word is often altered as k→g, s→z, t→d, and h→b (sometimes h→p) is called rendaku (連濁). I explained it a little in another answer, but here is a more detailed explanation. There are no firm rules to tell when it happens completely. However, as the Wikipedia ...


12

I'm fairly certain that this has to do with pitch in Japanese and accentuation in English. The natural pitch for デバグ【HLL】 is HLL, whereas デバッグ【LHLL】 would naturally be LHL (and バグ【HL】 is HL). To mimic accentuation by pitch (i.e. accented syllables get a high pitch after transliteration), the ッ is necessary to give the バ a (natural) high pitch. バグ already ...


9

It is たいおうずみ. More generally, the suffix 済 or 済み is read as ずみ. This is an example of rendaku.


4

The Japanese Wikipedia page for Aikido refers to the term as 片手取り, but doesn't give any information on how the word is read. The word also doesn't appear to show up in the dictionary. So, essentially, there is a possibility that the ending is read -どり rather than -とり. A quick Google search brings up one or two results that explicitly say it's read as かたてどり, ...


1

I do not know for sure but suppose that it is highly related to the original word that was used. In case of デバッグ this easily may be debugging, not the debug. And then formal transliteration was contracted even shorter. We know many examples like colloquial バイト which is a contraction of アルバイト. Of course this is only a theory and more detailed answer is ...


1

Tori and Dori are the same word. Because Dori is the voiced version of Tori, to a Japanese speaker there would be no perceived difference. However, katate dori would probably be easier to be spoken for a native speaker and thus would appear that they may be the more correct answer. another more famous example of this is when you combine Ao and Sora ...


1

Looking at goo.ne.jp's dictionary (based off 大辞泉): 1 手の中におさめる。手に持つ。 Source: http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/leaf/jn2/161480/m0u/%E5%8F%96%E3%82%8B/ With the last part of the definition meaning to hold in one's hand. This matches more closes with the definition of denoting a grab that you are referring to. I was not able to find どり denoting the same ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible