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Always keep in mind that Japanese is a head-final language and will put modifying clauses after the head. For example, your sentence can be broken down as: the cat (that I can't understand) is talking. In Japanese this would be (私がわからない)猫は喋っている as seafood258 already stated. Japanese does not use words such as that or which, and will place the modifying ...


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Like in English, Japanese nouns can be modified by phrases. The sentence you gave could be broken into: A cat is talking. ねこはしゃべっている。 I don't understand the cat. わたしはねこがわからない。 Combined, they yield: The cat I don't understand is talking. わたしがわからないねこは しゃべっている。 As you can see, one can simply prefix the noun with a descriptive phrase. It simply ...


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In English, the tense of the main clause and relative clauses is usually relative to the time at which the sentence is spoken. I waited until the bus came. You use the past tense on both verbs because both the waiting and the coming happened in the past. But while you were waiting, the bus hadn't come yet! So, relative to the action of waiting, the bus ...


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You can use verbs in dictionary form to express the action of the noun. You can also change most of the verbs into ている forms without any change in meaning. You can also use た forms, especially if there are time words marking past like 昨日 etc. All in all, all they are doing is acting like an adjective to describe the noun it is connected to. So you ...


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漢字が持つ is a relative clause. It has a gap in object position: 漢字-が __-を 持つ The gap is filled semantically by the following noun phrase 体系的なつながり: ① ​  漢字-が 体系的なつながり-を 持つ   ② [ 漢字-が ________-を 持つ ] 体系的なつながり These can be translated into English: ① Kanji have a systematic relationship. ② the systematic relationship [ which kanji have __ ] ...



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