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23

Atashi is for females. Chicchai can be seen as more emphatic "tiny". They are both quite common. Remember that in most textbooks for any language the most ideal form of the language (often judged so by prescriptive grammarians) is taught. As you familiarize yourself with real world usage (through travel, friends, and media) you will discover all sorts of ...


17

Disclaimer: I'm just a random Japanese native and my answer below isn't based on formal research or anything like that. The feminine 「わ」 seems to have become almost extinct. You see it in text books and novels, but it's extremely rare to hear people actually using it. The kansai 「わ」 is different from the feminine 「わ」. The feminine 「わ」 is used in 標準語 or ...


14

Well, there is indeed a stereotypical "Samurai way of talking" that you can see in Samurai films or in historical dramas (時代劇, Jidaigeki) on TV, but it's far from being authentic. In fact, Samurai talked in many different ways, depending on the era and their home province (after all, they were speaking in their dialect). As far as I know, the stereotypical ...


12

Everyone's done a great job of answering this one, so I'm just going to add a quick answer. The なの that you're asking about is really just の. The な is only there if you use it after a noun or a na-adjective (きれい, 大変, 非常). The most common way of using this の is as a question marker. そうなの - Is it really? This is the same as そうなんですか but less formal. ...


11

We should also note that while 超- meaning "very" is colloquial, 超- meaning "super" or "above" (the "original" meaning of the kanji) is entirely acceptable as a prefix in a literary work. In fact, many words rely on it: 超大国 【ちょうたいこく】 superpower, as in US or USSR during the Cold War (from WWWJDIC) 大国 is a word in its own right - 超- is just a prefix. ...


10

なの relates to the ~のだ construction, and as such provides explanatory, secondary, or supporting information (which could be a reason, a cause, or other fact the speaker feels would aid in the listener's understanding). Note that the な is only used if the preceding word is a noun or な-adjective. Following a verb or い-adjective, only の is used: ...


10

They both mean "eat", as you no doubt already know. 食{た}べるhowever, is "eat" in the sense of "sit down and have a meal". Not strictly that, but that's more the image. It also means eat as in "sustenance", the food you eat regularly to stay alive. 食{く}う is eat in the sense of "consume", as in one animal eating another. 食う can be used for people, of course, ...


10

Rather than 死す (which I believe you are right in saying is literary), this is a slang suru-verb キュン死 meaning "death from a heart pang caused by seeing something cute". (Possible English translations: "death by d'awwing", "death from cuteness overdose/overload"?) The すっぞ comes from rough speech slurring -- するぞ→すんぞ→すっぞ -- so it fits his character.


9

うち is mostly used by girls to refer to themselves, but this usage is only common in Kansai-ben and perhaps other regional dialects as well, and it is generally not considered to be part of standard Japanese. See http://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q148192694 So to answer your question, yes if a guy says うち, he is probably most likely ...


9

Probably too vast a question to cover exhaustively, but I can offer a couple pointers picked from experience (mine and foreigners I've met): First-person pronouns (kinda obvious, really). Beside straight-up pronouns, the use of your own name to address yourself is a big tell-tale of female speech (some older grandpas can get away with it, but I doubt that ...


8

It depends on what kind of written works you consider. As Boaz wrote in a comment on the question, 超 (ちょう) meaning “very” is very colloquial. It is highly unlikely to see it in formal contexts, written or spoken. However, this does not mean that 超 (also written チョー or ちょー) is not used in written Japanese. See latest search results on Google of "超", "チョー" ...


8

As you probably already read in the question on dialects, Yakuzas are often pictured speaking Hiroshima-ben on TV. According to Japanese friends, this has probably as much to do with the fact that Hiroshima-ben naturally sounds quite hard to the ear (whereas soft-spoken Kyoto-ben is the typical dialect choice for cute, feminine characters) as any real-world ...


8

I think it comes from 撮影【さつえい】 where つ becomes ちゅ for some reason (slang?). A bit like おやちゅみなさい. Seems to me that さちゅえい refers to 撮影会 events. There are many types of 撮影会 but the main ones are for amateur photographers to meet, to take a picture with a character or model, to create publicity with an open photoshoot, or to recruit new models. They are ...


8

It's probably worth noting that 食う also gets used for things like time and money getting eaten up 「暇も金もパチンコ機器に食われちゃった。」 and being on the receiving end of bad stuff 「激しいパンチを食った。」 「お目玉(叱り)を食った。」. There's also a similar verb 食らう (くらう), with pretty much the same meaning.


8

I did a search on this and found the following: 昔、TBSの番組「ザ・ベスト10」で久米宏が なに気に 「〜かしら」と言ったのを見て初めは かなり衝撃でしたが アナウンサーの業界では以外と使われている様です。 あと学者や解説者など、有識者や育ちのいい人が 今でも比較的違和感なく使っていますね。 Loose translation: "Back in the days, Kume Hiroshi used it quite frequently in the show "The Best 10". While it may come as a shock to those who first experience it, it's ...


7

As opposed to 「か」, which is open-ended and can have any sort of answer, 「かい」 is expected to have an answer in the affirmative or negative only, that is, yes or no, with subsequent explanation optional. Example:  誰か来たのか  誰か来たのかい  誰が来たのか × 誰が来たのかい


7

Well, you are always free to use かしら, whether if people think if you are a weird is a different matter. It's not as much as being inappropriate(in a social sense) as to sounding weird. Linguistically it's usually used by female speakers and male speakers who are cross-dressers/gay as far as I know.


7

Well, since I have no examples to go off of, I'll guess at which type of scenario you're thinking of. It can mean like "But" or "Well (then)" in a kind of defensive sort of way. Usually giving a reason for some action. Like なぜかというと. Ex: お皿{さら}のものはみんな食{た}べなさい → Eat everything on your plate. だってお腹{なか}が一杯{いっぱい}なんだもん → But I'm full!


7

There are almost too many to list, but the simple (grammatical) ones are: Men should never use わ at the end of a sentence in place of よ. If you're REALLY good at Japanese as a man, you can get away with わ only when you're saying something to yourself aloud, such as 疲れたわ in passing, right before you decide to leave work, et al. Women can end sentences with ...


6

あたし (atashi) is the female version of 私 for referring to yourself. わたし (watashi) is the neutral form for that, so you can use it always. あたし is only used by females, while 僕 (ぼく, boku) one of multiple possibilities for males is (although 僕 by itself is rather informal). There are many words that are dependent on who it says, or who it is addressed. あたし is ...


6

In your example: これはあなたの財布ですか そうですね doesn't work. The ね at the end gives a feeling of asking for a confirmation (As in yes, right?) At the beginning of a sentence ね is used to get someone's attention or (if followed by an interrogation mark) to ask for confirmation. Just use そうです instead.


6

Yes, they're common, but those words in particular are very casual and あたし is only used by girls. Many women will not use it since it's so effeminate, but it's not uncommon.


6

I'm not sure where you're from, Aki, but depending on your native language you might have already come across a pair of words that mean almost the same thing, but one of them has a slightly bad connotation where the other is more neutral. In my native language, German, we have "essen" (to eat [humanly], 食べる) and "fressen" (to eat [animalistic], 食う).


6

かい is used to soften the rudeness of か in informal speech. Sentences like "見たか?" or "好きか?" are harsh to the ear, and using かい instead of か is thus nicer to the listener.


6

The first sentence 「ジュースなりコーラなり、お[好]{す}きなものをどうぞ。」 is perfectly natural. It is asking you to choose whatever you want to drink and "juice" and "cola" are only two examples of what is available. Point is you have other choices as well. The second sentence is different. By using 「か」, the speaker is giving the addressee two choices only --- "juice" and ...


5

This ぞと should be broken down into two particles: ...ぞ: reinforces and reminds one's decision or will to oneself ex. さあ、やるぞ。Here I go. ...と: light declaration ex. いつか行こうっと。I'll visit there one day. So your example roughly means, "There, I've posted a new blog article." And no, it doesn't add any politeness to the sentence. The same と is discussed in ...


5

食う is often used by teenage or young adults, especially males. According to a discussion I had with thirty-something Japanese guy the other day, it's a verb that people start to stop using when they reach 25/35, at which stage they go back to the less vernacular 食べる. However, 食う is pervasive in some dialects. For example, in Tôhoku, "食べてください" ("please ...



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