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2

It's 当て字. 決着{けっちゃく} does not have that reading and you won't find it in dictionaries. However, けりをつける is a saying in Japanese which does have an almost identical meaning. Why do they use [当て字]{あてじ}? This study divides the reason into 7 forms: ① 口語の読みを示す ② 外来語の読みを示す ③ 英語の略表記の読みを示す ④ スポーツ用語 ⑤ 代名詞 ⑥ 言い換え表現 ⑦ 作品固有の表現 I would say けりをつける is a 口語 form※, i.e. ...


4

Basically, in contemporary Japanese, intransitive 入る = /hairu/. The /iru/ readings are essentially all survivals from an earlier stage in which 入る was just /iru/. (In fact, /hairu/ is basically /hau/ "crawl" + /iru/, which is why sometimes in older texts you see it written 這入る). So your best bet is to assume that 入る is /hairu/ on its own and /ir-/ in ...


-1

入る(はいる) = intransitive verb 入れる(いれる) = transitive verb ex; 箱に入る(はいる) 箱に入れる(いれる) ex; 風が入る(はいる) 空気を入れる(いれる) I hope it helps you.^^


2

You are correct in that 人口 is a word (meaning "population"), but it is pronounced じんこう. In this instance, both kanji are using on-yomi, which is commonly used in compounds that linguistically originate from Japanese rather than Chinese. Dictionary entry from JDIC is here. You can easily find pronunciation(s) in dictionary entries. http://www.edrdg.org/...


4

No, 人口 is read じんこう (look the word up in a dictionary). Some kanji have more than one on'yomi. This is due to the fact that they were imported from different areas and/or in different eras from China. For 人, ジン is a kan'on (漢音) reading and ニン is a goon (呉音) reading. In compound words, usually both have the same type of on'yomi. Here, both ジン and コウ are kan'...


4

Well according to here there are 2 households with the last name 鮫{さめ} in Japan. Perhaps you met one of them? :) However, if you change it to 鮫島{さめじま/さめしま} you can find many more households, like this women's soccer player: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aya_Sameshima


2

A tricky issue with many implications! As a single character, it should just be read doku. But it is regarded as the abbreviation of 独逸語 doitsugo or shorter 独語 dokugo which Japanese and also Koreans (under Japanese rule) have chosen to refer to the German language in the 19th century. Most Japanese natives would read it doitsugo or dokugo. As the single ...


3

If I read aloud this sentence, I omit the parenthesis part or convert it to more understandable expression like 鉄血宰相、ドイツ語ではEiserner Kanzler、の異名を取る The most common use of those single-kanji country names is the pairs/combinations of countries such as [日米]{にちべい}, [米中]{べいちゅう}, [日韓]{にっかん}, [日中韓]{にっちゅうかん}, and some language names such as [英語]{えいご}, [仏語]{ふつご}...


7

The verb is usually written 落とす. 落す is a much less common variant (which is not an official reading: 落: ラク、お-ちる、お-とす). The BCCWJ has 落とす 1657 results 落す  130 results One way to remember the okurigana is to note that the reading of the kanji should be short enough, i.e. the okurigana should be long enough, to accommodate all transitive/intransitive ...


3

内容紹介 鍛治の里に暮らす少年キリヒトは、師の命により、大陸最古の図書館を統べるマツリカに仕えることになる。古今の書物を繙き、数多の言語を操って策を巡らせるがゆえ、「魔女」と恐れられる彼女は、自分の声をもたないうら若き少女だった。本を愛し、言葉の力を信じるすべての人に! I guess average Japanese readers don't know how to pronounce 繙き (especially if without the help from the context) but still, they know majority of pronunciation. These two facts can coexist, right? FYI ひもとく itself is ...


8

As far as it concerns Kanjis used in daily newspapers and magazines and modern literatures, I think most of Japanese don’t have much problem in reading and pronouncing them. But it applies only to 現代文 – modern Japanese language. But when it comes to 文語文– written in classic writing styles i.e., the style used in Meiji period (1868 -1912) and earlier than ...


10

As long as you are reading common novels, you can generally believe that average Japanese speakers can pronounce almost all kanji that don't come with with furigana (But as for 図書館の魔女, I don't know, since I had no way to review its contents. According to the book reviews, it seems that the book contains rather difficult words.) But there are some "well-...


6

Simply, 星嶺鷹守学園 is one long proper noun. So you should translate it as "Seirei Takagami Academy/School/etc" without thinking of the etymology. You don't want New York to be translated as 新ヨーク even if "new" definitely means 新 :-) And it's very difficult to analyze this phrase "etymologically", too. Of course it's easy to split it into kanji and explain the ...



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