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2

The on-yomi of this kanji, ち, is not used alone; it only appears in compounds such as 中央値【ちゅうおうち】 (median), 平均値【へいきんち】 (mean), 最頻値【さいひんち】 (mode), 真偽値【しんぎち】 (boolean value). If you just want to say value (of something) in mathematical/statistical/programming contexts, this kanji is always read as あたい.


2

As a nuance, 一時(いちじ) means tentative or temporary, like: [一時的]{いちじてき}[措置]{そち} - tentative measure 一時[立替]{たてかえ} - temporary financing 一時的[避難]{ひなん} - temporary evacuation 一時(いっとき)means momentary or transient, like: [一時]{いっとき}の[憩]{いこ}い - a short break [訊]{き}くは[一時]{いっとき}の恥、訊かぬは一生の恥 - It's a momentary shame for you to ask a ...


5

Originally, these kanji were thought to be pronounced as: 右衛門: u we mon But since Japanese u and consonant w have little difference, the actual pronunciation was like: 右衛門: wwe~we mon Later, undergone the phonological change that merged wi, we, wo into i, e, o: 右衛門: e mon So the truth is 右 and 衛 share a single syllable, but the fact has ...


4

Wouldn't っ normally require the first onyomi to have a tsu ending? No. This small っ is unrelated to big つ in most cases. This letter is used as gemination (促音【そくおん】) marker that you should double the next consonant*1. One source of geminate consonants is kanji that had final consonant accommodated to Japanese pronunciation*2 e.g. 合 kap + 戦 sen → 合戦 ...


0

I think in general this happens to ease pronunciation, so a word isn't too hard to pronounce then generally it doesn't have to change. I think I've heard of variations based on modern / past or dialect. This for example doesn't even have to a 'k' sound or a 'big つ' initially, even words like 暖かい (あたたかい) are very commonly pronounced (あったかい), ta-ta-ka is ...


2

The name of this phenomenon is called "gemination," and it is a specific case of a larger phenomenon that happens in many languages called "sandhi" (after some research, there appears to be a Japanese term for this as well, known as 連{れん}音{おん}). As for why it doesn't happen in 加湿器, I actually am not 100% sure myself, but I would guess it's because Japanese ...


2

Regarding your questions (1),(2),(3), (1) “挙げた六句” means six haikus of 一茶 the writer quoted in the beginning of his article. (2)”弱い生命への愛の歌です。その愛をもたない存在(もの)への怒りの歌です” can be translated as; It’s the poem of love to be dedicated to the feeble and transient life. It is a poem expressing the anger directed to the soul who doesn’t have love and sympathy for the ...


6

I think the meaning of あげる here is "bring up", as in "bring up a topic". So he is probably talking about some things he brought up earlier. その愛をもたない存在ー>その愛を持たない存在。「愛を持たない」 modifies 「存在」. This is called a subordinate verb clause. Sometimes writers like to play around with furigana to create special meanings of their own. They want you to read that word a ...



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