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17

The short answer is: not all the elements of all the characters are ‘radicals’. For example 凹 (concave, hollow) consists according to the dictionaries of 部首 bushu (or radical if you will, more on that below) 凵 and three more strokes that cannot be further analyzed or categorized. A more complete answer would depend (as Tsuyoshi Ito already indicated in his ...


15

In principle, it's arbitrary. Dictionary makers are free to put 富 under whichever section they want, and the same goes for 仏 or any other character. And in fact, editors of some dictionaries put characters under different radicals; see for example the New Nelson. As such, they can have different motivations, and it's impossible to answer what the ...


11

In all three, the two dots are 八. As an element in other characters, 八 often appears upside-down; sometimes it depends on the particular font which way it faces. As for meaning, we can consult a variety of sources, but they all agree on the basics: Zhongwen.com describes 八 as "an ideograph representing division". Henshall says it symbolizes ...


11

I'll have a start at an answer, but not sure I'm able to completely answer it. In many cases, radicals on the left side of the kanji indicate the "class" or meaning that the kanji belongs to. This seems to be moreso the case with physical objects rather than abstract concepts. For example, 人 - person - (called "nin-ben" as the left radical): 休、体、代、伝 ...


9

The choice of radicals (部首{ぶしゅ}) as in the dictionary radicals (as opposed to any other selection of components), comes from Chinese and presumably was adopted alongside the kanji themselves. The first source to use radicals was a second-century Chinese dictionary called Shuōwén Jiězì (說文解字 - in Japanese 説文解字{せつもんかいじ}). This included 540 radicals. The set ...


7

Although there have been many sets of radicals and many classifications over the years, the traditional set of 214 radicals is now usually identified with the famous 康煕字典 (Kangxi Zidian). To many people, if you say the radical, it's understood that you're referring to the traditional Kangxi classification. From that point of view, the traditional radical ...


7

This boils down to the question "What is a radical?" In the loose sense, it's any part of a kanji, which occurs in a number of characters. In some stricter sense, it's one of the 214 kanji radicals that have been used to index kanji characters ever since they appeared in the 1615 Zihui 1716 Kangxi Dictionary dictionaries. For searching by applying a ...


5

The form of 花 with a gap in the radical making it 4 strokes instead of 3 is called the 旧字体 (old character form) and the one that is used most of the time these days is called 新字体. Neither is correct or sloppy, they're just two different ways of writing the same character. This is related to the fact that characters in general have been simplified in ...


5

This is just the opinion of your dictionary. According to the KRADFILE, 出 has these radicals: # # K R A D F I L E # # Copyright 2001/2005 Michael Raine, James Breen and the Electronic # Dictionary Research & Development Group at Monash University. # See: http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/groups/edrdg/licence.html ...


5

(Revised) According to this site (http://www.saiga-jp.com/cgi-bin/dic.cgi?m=search&sc=0&f=0&j=)the radical is やね, which is Japanese for roof. I don't think this is one of the traditional 214 radicals (http://kanjialive.com/214-traditional-kanji-radicals/) but it does get used by Henshall in his book "Kanji: Remembering the Japanese Characters". ...


4

In addition to makdad's wonderful answer, I'll add this on the issue of whether you need to pay attention to radicals when learning kanji. This is only one data point and no more than one person's opinion, but I don't think learning radicals is all that important if you want to read Japanese. It does help to know that certain kanji (such as "heart" and ...


3

はちがしら / hachigashira however, the 部首 of your examples are: 前 = りっとう 咲 = くちへん 呼 = くちへん Trying to derive meaning from radicals can be a fool's errand in many cases.


3

What is meant by a "reliable translation"? Let's look at 彳: In Japanese, it is given the nickname ぎょうにんべん. This is customarily translated to "going man". If you want a translation of these customary nicknames, you can find them in the New Nelson dictionary. But whoops--that's just a nickname! How about a definition? Well, that depends on what you ...


3

I think studying radicals is a good thing. However there are lists that are more specifically geared towards Japanese then Chinese. If you use a number of sources, you can see commonalities between scholarly interpretations, and these will help you get a firmer grasp of the concepts at hand. For instance, I think that unfortunately the names of radicals ...


3

Two premises: Radicals are a method for indexing characters in dictionaries. As an element in other characters, the form 月 can represent 肉, 舟, 丹, and 月, among others. As you can see, these elements all look rather similar, so it's not surprising that historically they weren't always distinguished in form. So when you see a character containing what ...


2

Someone collected those with unicode points. http://shimapucchi.blog93.fc2.com/blog-entry-321.html http://tokyo.cool.ne.jp/kondo_hiro/proverb/busyu/busyu.htm http://www.efontshop.com/feaddfont/help/busyu_list.htm http://www.kanjijiten.net/radical/index.html (page is in shift-jis encoding) http://www.kanjikentei.jp/list/bushubetsu/ or some at ...


2

There are several useful systems for learning Kanji by building a memorable "story" based on (sometimes random) radical names. My favorite example of a useful story is remembering the kanji for "tall", which is 高. Breaking it apart from top down, we see a cowboy hat over a mouth, above a space helmet with a mouth visible inside. Of course, this is Woody ...


1

From Chinese character point of view of things the radical is definitely 入 (even though it is written 人 on top!). Why? While I'd take the following with a pinch of salt, I still think it's worth considering: Etymology (文字來源): Remnant Primitive, all of a persons stuff 工壬 under one roof 入 - complete -Chinese Etymology


1

It is referring to a technique for learning kanji in which the various components of the kanji are given "names". In addition to breaking the kanji down into an easily quantifiable number of components, it helps to create a mnemonic sentence for the kanji out of the mnemonic words of each component. For example, "烙" means "burn", so a technique for ...


1

it's two radicals drawn the same way. The radical for 肉 looks like 月 in most instances and the radical for 月 looks like 月 in all instances. The former radical means "flesh" / The latter means time. As to why they changed it, I don't know. Maybe it's just easier to write. But it is known which radical each character is using (and generally pretty obvious due ...


1

There is 仁, which fits all of your descriptions. You wouldn't have found it with the rod radical, because the rod is a vertical line. Most digital dictionaries have a search function by stroke number as well (or at least order the results by stroke number), which would have helped. Plus [二]{に} is actually a traditional radical. My dictionary gives at least ...


1

My $0.02: I would not worry too much about trying to find a definitive list so much as text/list that works for you. It might even be worth taking several lists and cherry picking the definition that you can remember most easily. I once tried to learn kanji via the radicals. After a while, for time it was taking and the return obtained I decided I was ...



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