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Questions can be asked in either positive or negative. They only vary by politeness (with the latter being more so). 映画{えいが}を見{み}ませんか。 映画を見ますか。 These are two nearly identical ways of asking the same thing (Do you want to see a movie?). The only difference is that the former is slightly more polite. Also, unlike English, responses are reversed when ...


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These "negative questions" as you refer to them are an appropriate way to invite someone to do something with you. So 映画{えいが}を見{み}ませんか。 can read as Won't you see a movie (with me)? Would you like to see a movie (with me)? Your example 映画を見ますか。 can read as Are you going to see a/the movie? Will you watch the movie? ...


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You can definitely make yourself understood by saying 「もう1つ?」 with rising intonation, but it's better to use the appropriate counter for bottles ("本"). And we usually add some verb even in the most casual settings. To your friend, colloquially: もう[1本]{いっぽん}[行]{い}く? (行く ≒ "go on" here) もう1本いる? もう1本[飲]{の}む? If you have to say this politely: もう1本お[飲]{の}...


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In that situation, we would use, "もう[一本]{いっぽん}". [助数詞]{じょすうし} can be quite confusing even to native Japanese speakers sometimes. Once the beer is poured into a glass, it becomes 「[一杯]{いっぱい}」. I would say 「[一つ]{ひとつ}」 is usually used for solid objects, but it's not applicable to all solid objects, though. Here are links which might be helpful for you to get ...


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The OP is looking for options in "Casual speech" In the spoken language you don't need 「か」. With this you make a rise in intonation at the end of the sentence to indicate that it is a question. All of these examples below translate as "Do you want this?" これを欲{ほ}しい? This can also be used: これを欲{ほ}しいの? Of course someone just learning would be ...



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