Hot answers tagged

19

I think that in some cases, ending a question in の is fine for male speakers. For example, I hear え~、そうなの? quite often from male speakers. I think, in general, we have that (all male speech) rhetorical questions are allowed to end in の, e.g. even if it is clear what the other person is doing, you may ask 何をしてるの? or 何してんの? What (the heck) are ...


18

Everyone's done a great job of answering this one, so I'm just going to add a quick answer. The なの that you're asking about is really just の. The な is only there if you use it after a noun or a na-adjective (きれい, 大変, 非常). The most common way of using this の is as a question marker. そうなの - Is it really? This is the same as そうなんですか but less formal. ...


17

お仕事は? Oshigoto wa? is basically short for お仕事は何ですか? Oshigoto wa nan desu ka? あなたは仕事ですか? Anata wa shigoto desu ka? means "Are you work?" and is nonsensical†. は wa (not わ BTW) is the topic marker.* Just asking 〜は basically means "About ~..." and only hints at the actual question. Leaving things unspoken is a very typical thing in Japanese. "About (your) ...


16

Yes, it can be used in a question, as long as the sentence also contains a question word: だれ, なに, どこ, etc. 誰だ? = Who's there? 何やってんだよ = What (the hell) are you doing? - (Note that よ can be added at the end) Both of your examples fit this pattern: どうして and どこ are the question words. Without a question word, you are much less likely to see this pattern, ...


16

どうする is more general than 何をする. The latter is more related to a specific event, whereas the former asks for a general course of action. I would thus say that you could translate the sentence as 母親の気持ちに対して、住友君はどうしましたか? How did Sumitomo-kun react to his mother's feelings? rather than What specifically did Sumitomo-kun do with regards to his ...


15

An authoritative classic, the Kāngxī dictionary, lists over 47,000 characters. The Hanyu Da Zidian, a more modern reference, has over 54,000 characters; the Dai Kan-Wa Jiten, the Japanese equivalent, has over 50,000. Even more recently, the Zhōnghuá Zìhǎi has over 85,000 characters, but apparently many of those are variants. Of course, such counting is ...


15

Translating "want" is slightly difficult: "want that" =「thatが欲しい」"want to own that stuff" "want to do that act" = 「thatをしたい」 "want to be that" = 「thatになりたい」"want to become that role/position/status" or「thatでありたい」"want to keep that state" I think「僕のチームのメンバーになりたいですか」is good for "Do you want to become my team member?". If you ask him/her to become your ...


12

なの relates to the ~のだ construction, and as such provides explanatory, secondary, or supporting information (which could be a reason, a cause, or other fact the speaker feels would aid in the listener's understanding). Note that the な is only used if the preceding word is a noun or な-adjective. Following a verb or い-adjective, only の is used: ...


11

There is なのです (often contracted to なんです), which fits the bill. Just like you suspect, it is declarative/emphatic. This なんです is unrelated to 何{なん}です, but rather a combination of な (the inflection of the copula だ, if you like), the nominalizer の plus the "politifier" です. It also exists in non-polite form: なのだ・なんだ. It really appears everywhere, e.g. as a ...


10

I think you're referring to いかがですか ikaga desu ka which is the polite version of どうですか dou desu ka How are things? It can be used to ask "How are you?" in a polite way, but only with caution: いかがですか【ikaga desu ka】 is mostly used to mean "Would you like some?", so if you're holding something in your hand, one might assume you're offering to ...


10

A good structure you might want to look into is the ~ましょう verb ending. It means "let's __" You attach ましょう to the verb stem, so for "let's speak" it would be はなしましょう. To make it "shall we __?" you add "か" to the end. So for "shall we speak?" it would be はなしましょうか?


9

You want to ask your "pen friend" whether she wants to talk with you in Japanese or English, Don't you? In this situation, I say "日本語で はなしますか、それとも英語で はなしますか?". This sentence means "Which would you like to speak in? Japanese or English?"


9

席{せき} is a good example. Please look at examples as follows. A. どの席{せき}ですか。 B. 何{なん}席{せき}ですか。 C. 何{なに}席{せき}ですか。 All of these are grammatically, and each sentence is different question from the others. A. どの席ですか。 You would say A when you don't know which seat it is. どの is used when you want to know which of the three or more. どちらの is ...


8

It's fine, although, as in English, if you stack up too many you end up with something faintly ridiculous, of course. (This can even be emphasised for humorous purposes: try Googling "地球が何回回った時"). Still, I would say that Japanese is more tolerant of multiple WH- words in a sentence than English is, maybe because in Japanese the WH- words can be left in ...


8

Most naturally and commonly, that would be: 「あっ、あと、氷も入れていただけませんか?」 We also use 「それと」 as well. Despite what you stated, 「それから」 is not a bad choice at all. Native speakers use that, too. You can say 「あとひとつ」, 「(それと/それから)もうひとつ」, etc. as well.


8

This is a good example of where direct or literal translation does not work well between Japanese and another language. We often use 「どう」 where English-speakers would use nothing but "what". 「どうしよう。」 or 「どうしたらいいの。」 vs. "What should I do?" 「どうしましたか。」 vs. "What happened?" If you used 「なに」 instead of 「どう」 in the phrases above, you would sound more ...


8

"Instead of 「か」, real questions in casual speech are usually asked with the explanatory の particle or nothing at all except for a rise in intonation" http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/question


8

クレジットカードによる modifies お支払い and クレジットカードによるお支払いを希望される modifies 方. [方]{かた} means 人, someone or a person, or in this case, 'you', customers. The される in 希望される is not passive but honorific. To those who wish to / If you wish to pay by credit card, please read..  


8

All of desu, deshita, and datta appear normally before ka. But da is an exception. In main clauses (like your examples), da is deleted before ka: desu + ka →   desu ka deshita + ka → deshita ka da + ka →   ka datta + ka →  datta ka In subordinate clauses (like [dare da ka] shiranai), da sometimes appears before ka. ...


7

If you drop か, your rising intonation will indicate a question. 今何時ですか。- canonical polite form 今何時です- slightly less formal, feminine form. 今何時- casual 今何時だ- demanding and rude. Doesn't require rising intonation. Just watch something with gangsters and you'll hear it :)


7

Well, I'm not native, so I don't know if this disqualifies me from answering... ... But in the context of your question, I'd say この後(で)どこ{へ/に}行く? Your #1 could work, but using just あと instead of このあと gives a sense of "later" later. Adding the この solidifies the meaning of "after this", where "this" means being at school. You wouldn't use まで unless John ...


7

As opposed to 「か」, which is open-ended and can have any sort of answer, 「かい」 is expected to have an answer in the affirmative or negative only, that is, yes or no, with subsequent explanation optional. Example:  誰か来たのか  誰か来たのかい  誰が来たのか × 誰が来たのかい


7

It's basically a shortening of それで何?, meaning something along the lines of 'and so...?' or 'then what?' It asks for either a continuation of the thought (especially in a story or something else temporally organised) or a conclusion (as in 'what you just said is setting something up, what is it?').


7

To take the "casually" part literally, you could say: 「(お)[名前]{なまえ}は?」 「(お)名前、[聞]{き}いてもいい(かな)?」 or 「(お)名前聞いてもいいっすか?」 「なにさんって[呼]{よ}んだらいいのかな?」 or 「なにさんって呼んだらいいっすか?」 「(お)名前[教]{おし}えてもらえる(かな)?」 , etc.


7

This でも is used to mean "〜 or something", usually in regards to suggestions. It leaves room for other options. 食事でもどうですか → How about something to eat (or something else)? お茶にでもいかない? → Would you like to go out for tea maybe? 参照 The use of でも and ででも in this sentence


7

It doesn't sounds to me like there would be an implied 何 there. I think it means just literally "well then, do you want to become [one]?" Would be easier to say for sure with some context about the conversation, i.e. were they talking about becoming something specific before that.


6

かい is used to soften the rudeness of か in informal speech. Sentences like "見たか?" or "好きか?" are harsh to the ear, and using かい instead of か is thus nicer to the listener.


6

50,000 is usually the number given for the number of Kanji characters since the dawn of time. 2,000 is roughly the number than comprises compulsory education. 5,000 is often assigned to particularly well-read persons (e.g. university professors). I remember reading a newspaper article about one of these "living national treasures", who was supposedly able ...


6

The quick answer: rather than interpreting this as だけ "only", this is 丈 ("length"). Normally read as take, voices during compounding. Before someone calls me out on it, the more precise answer: both are the same word. The word dake "only" is written as 丈 and derives from 丈 (take). The translation "only" is not always appropriate as is clear in this case. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible