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13

I think you're not really talking about puns here, but about something that's somewhat related, but still quite different: you're talking about slips-of-tongue (いいまちがい) that accidentally turn out to mean something else. Puns are quite different, since they are always intentional, and they can have multiple meanings either because they sound the same as ...


11

That's called 語呂合わせ and you could find full article at Wikipedia. Quoted from Wikepedia 1 : いち、い、ひとつ、ひと 2 : に、ふたつ、ふた、ふ、つ(英語から)、じ 3 : さん、さ、みっつ、みつ、み 4 : よん、よ、よっつ、し、ふぉ(英語から)、ほ 5 : ご、こ、い、いつつ、いつ 6 : ろく、ろ、むっつ、むつ、む 7 : しち、ななつ、なな、な 8 : はち、は、ぱあ、やっつ、やつ、や、やあ 9 : きゅう、きゅ、く、ここのつ、ここの、こ 0 : ...


7

The pun is that the kanji 「猥」, read 「わい」, means "obscene", whereas 「ワイシャツ」 means "dress shirt". The portmanteau 「猥シャツ」 therefore means "obscene shirt".


7

Whether the emperor meant it as a "pun" (or something similar) is pretty hard to know. But it is doubtful. 昭和 means harmony for the same reason that 和 is associated to Japan: in both cases, 和 represents the very specifically-Japanese conception of "social harmony" (which is different enough from the western word, for many scholars to use "Wa", even in ...


6

It is a pun. 「[絶好調]{ぜっこうちょう}」 is a word meaning "top form", "best condition", etc. And as you said, 「[蝶]{ちょう}」 means a "butterfly". Types of butterflies are named 「~~蝶」, so there you go.


6

Caveat emptor: My sphere of knowledge is biased towards internet slangs. The phenomenon of snowcloning is common in Japanese, while the term itself is not widely known. 能登かわいいよ能登 -> XかわいいよX (The original phrase made it into a slang dictionary published in 2007) 見ろ! 人がゴミのようだ! -> 見ろ! XがYのようだ! (With Y being ゴミ in most cases) パンが無いならお菓子を食べればいいじゃない -> ...


6

To my surprise, after some research I found a strong link between the "hotta imo" phrase and John Manjiro, Japan's first "exchange student" to America. John Manjiro was a Japanese fisherman who, along with his four brothers, was ship wrecked on a pacific island and rescued by a passing American whaling ship. After being carried to Honolulu (Dec 17, 1850), ...


5

I will just comment one subquestion: "Is it possible that the Japanese language have more room to generate possible puns, raising the number of funny puns?". Well, as far as I experienced it, puns are not that well received by the Japanese audience… As it is very easy to do, doing puns in Japanese isn't a highly acclaimed knowledge you can boast about. ...


5

胃 is read い and NASA reads "なさ" so what this actually says is おやすみなさい ("Good night"). However, I don't know wether this is a typo or an intentional misspelling.


4

This kind of (rather poor) pun is generally considered to be おやじギャグ. As far as I know, there is no word specifically referring to "AだけにB" jokes. I think the third meaning of that dictionary (であるから、それにふさわしく) can be applied. 「バスケット, therefore I say, スケット」. Sorry, I'm not the right person to answer this part of your question. However, "no pun intended" seems ...


4

This is actually an interesting topic, here's a quote from wikipedia: In Japanese, hybrid words are common in kango – words formed from kanji characters – where some of the characters may be pronounced using Chinese pronunciations (on'yomi, from Chinese morphemes), and others in the same word are pronounced using Japanese pronunciations ...


4

As with @repecmps's answer, there's no real set rule, but often businesses will make up catchy words so that you can easily remember them. For example, the phone number 0840-0141 could be おはよう、おいしい to remind you of a breakfast diner. Also, people with the last name Saito (さいとう) often attach 3110 (3-さ, 1-い, 10-とう) to their email address, screen names, etc. ...


3

Quote from this page: I surrender. (私は投降します)→「愛されんだぁ」 日本兵に向けたビラに、軍から取り残された時のための言葉として岡繁樹(1878-1959、日本からの帰化アメリカ人)が書いたもの(上坂冬子著、1989年中央公論社刊「女が振り返る昭和の歴史」より)。 Translation: I surrender (which was made as [愛]{あい}されんだぁ, a play on the English phrase) : Oka Shigeki (1878-1959, a native Japanese who became an American citizen) wrote this on flyers passed out to ...


3

Look up the word 猥褻. It will all become clear. 猥褻 = わいせつ = obscenity


3

(Per the asker's request, I'll be including romaji in this answer following Japanese text where it is used.) As Earthling noted, they're finding ways to re-use both versions of the phrase in the sentence. So we started with: アルミ缶の上にあるミカン。Arumi-kan no ue ni aru mikan. It uses the same 5 morae (a ru mi ka n), but changes where the split falls (in this ...


3

I think it's pretty common, although not necessarily punning so much as just a play-on-words. I can't remember but a couple right now. I'll edit in more later if I remember them. 委員会【いいんかい】の許可を得た。びっくりして「いいんかい?」と答えた。 → I got the committee's permission. Surprised, I responded "(Is it) Really (OK)?". A major station I used to frequent had a nearby ...


2

No, it is not a pun on 神隠し。 Although, I've learned that the the word "kami" (as in 神、髪、上)all came from a common ancestry word meaning something that is higher, or more honerable. So the words themselves are related in that sense.


2

"「よ、ね、な、で、に、へ、が、は、と、から、の、では、でも、のに、ので」は助詞です。" That could be even longer, but you get the point that it's going to be difficult to beat the concept :)


2

From what I understood from Wikipedia, it was meant to express the hope for peace at home and the desire for the rest of the world to be prosperous together: 国民の平和および世界各国の共存繁栄を願う意味である。 It lists a few other ideas for the name of the era as well: 「神化」「元化」「同和」「継明」「順明」「明保」「寛安」「元安」


1

I think that's because 和 can be used as short form of 平和(へいわ-peace), 調和(ちょうわ-harmonious), 大和(やまと-Japan) and may be there is something more.


1

The ones that I am most familiar with are for tying historical events to years. They can be found in vast numbers on websites like these ones and in exam study guides. I'm not sure about "generally accepted"; some are probably more widely known than others. I would not be surprised to observe patterns corresponding to the 流派 (schools) of traditional ...



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