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Because it's just kana it would be easy to get confused and join together words improperly (foreign learners can certainly attest to this). Although it's a different language with different rules, as a general rule of language processing, providing visual separation enhances readability until such point that the learner can move on to kanji and/or quickly ...


9

There's a quick way to know this. The place where a space can be inserted is roughly the same place where ね can be naturally inserted. あらわれでたのはね、 くろマントにね、くろいね、ぼうしのね、さんにんぐみ。 それはそれはね、こわーいね、どろぼうさまのね、おでかけだ。 Actually this structure is known as 文節. Basically, a 文節 starts with a noun/adjective/verb/adverb/etc, optionally followed by one or more subsidiary ...


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This practice is known as 分{わ}かち書{が}き. As you said, it's not really used in normal written Japanese. Spaces, however, are used in texts that are mostly kana based, such as those for kids or for foreigners new to the language. Its purpose is to separate words and to help avoid confusion. Wikipedia gives the example of: こうしまるやさいいち being interpretable as ...


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It's a double hyphen, not an equals sign. One of it's use is when transliterating names that have a hyphen in them. This is to avoid confusion with the extended sound symbol (ー) in Japanese. For example: クロード・レヴィ=ストロース (Claude Lévi-Strauss) Another time when the double hyphen is used is when in the original language, there is a stop in the sound. Your ...



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