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21

The dots, called [傍点]{ぼうてん}, function like italics or underline with the Latin alphabet. They are for emphasis. To see the effect in rōmaji: futatabi kanojo jishin no kuchi kara kiku koto ni naru to wa


16

中点 ・ is used to express listing. In English, it would be expressed with a comma and the word and. A・B・C   (Japanese) A, B, and C  (English) Japanese has a counterpart to the comma, that is 読点 、, but its use is different from a comma. Some people use 読点 for listing things like this: A、B、C but it is not standard. In horizontal writing, some ...


16

In Japanese, the symbols 「」 are called 鉤括弧 (かぎかっこ) and the symbols 『』 are called 二重鉤括弧 (にじゅうかぎかっこ). The basic rules for these symbols are simple: 「」 is used to denote quotation, and 『』 is used to denote quotation inside a 「」-quote. Example: 先生が生徒に「『おはよう』はフランス語で何と言いますか」と聞いた。 (せんせいがせいとに「『おはよう』はフランスごでなんといいますか」ときいた。) A teacher asked a student, “How do you ...


12

The symbol “、” is called [読点]{とうてん}. It is used to denote a semantic separation or a pause. Compared to comma in English, the usage of 読点 in Japanese is less governed by the grammatical rules. In other words, in Japanese, the author is free to use or not to use 読点 in any place where a separation makes sense. When two nouns are placed side by side without ...


10

This is the excerpt I found here: The symbol ※, called 米印(こめじるし), literally "rice symbol," is used in Japanese texts to introduce comments and remarks. Unlike the asterisk (*) in English, ※ is usually not used to link an item in the body of the text to a footnote. Rather, the purpose of ※ is to draw the reader's attention to an instruction or precaution ...


8

All 3 are correct. could appear in old and/or formal Japanese, where the question mark is often absent. Note that you would still need a punctuation then, probably a full stop: 「。」 and 3. will both appear anywhere and depend only on the level of formality of the conversation. Omitting the particle would make your question slightly more familiar (or, in ...


7

I may be wrong about that, but I think they just serve as primary and secondary quotation marks - the same way single quotes and double quotes serve in English. They exist since sometimes printers want to distinguish two kinds of quotes. How exactly they're used and what exactly they distinguish depends on the publisher or writer, of course. The most usual ...


7

I am not sure about whether there is supposed to be a space on either side of the ~ symbol, or whether the symbol should be on both sides or one side. Is there a clear mentioning of this usage? It depends on the style guide. However, most style guides I have found recommend putting the symbol with no spaces on either just the front or both sides. In ...


5

I traced the photo to this place in Okazaki (Aichi prefecture): On their web page, they claim to offer the cheapest gas based on a crowd-sourced survey of gas prices elsewhere in Japan. The numbers shown on the signs are based on these survey results: 一番安いガソリンスタンドはここ!皆さんから投稿された全国のガソリン価格口コミ情報をリアルタイムにお届け! Further down the page, it mentions that the ...


4

Strictly speaking, I think it should be 「忙しい」の対義語に当たる形容詞は何でしょうか。 but the person wrote it as 忙しい、の対義語に当たる形容詞は何でしょうか。 probably because s/he thought it wouldn't cause any confusion (and maybe because s/he was just being lazy; I might do that too when I want to save the trouble of typing the brackets :p). If it was like ...


4

The way you have it is fine. In general, always use round parentheses, square parentheses are not used very much perhaps except only in specialized areas. However, it is common in Japan to use different types of parentheses when nesting, i.e. [()]. This is also why they are referred to as 小カッコ (), 中カッコ {} and 大カッコ [].


3

うち means "inside," "between," "while." In this example, it is about the temporal span. As まだ suggests, it is assumed that at some temporal point, the person will become relaxed (くつろいだ気分になる). Until then, there is a time span, and that time span corresponds to くつろいだ気分にならないうち "within the temporal span where one has not become relaxed." About the punctuation in ...


3

In this case, Verb+ないうちに means something like: while Verb hasn't happened yet... In this case, ならないうちに also goes with the context; namely, the verb that precedes it (くつろぐ・to feel at home with someone.) So it becomes: while a Japanese person hasn't had a chance to feel at home yet with a stranger... or more naturally put: before a Japanese person feels at ...


3

Another way of describing a list is using 中点 "・".


3

The slash is not among the symbols traditionally used in punctuation in Japanese, and nakaguro “・” is the symbol for this purpose. However, the forward slash is also common nowadays, especially when user interface of application software is concerned.


3

The 中黒 is used as punctuation and is only part of written language (文語体) and does not represent anything in spoken language (口語体). (You will find no 中黒 in bedtime stories.) When reading to yourself, or to someone reading the text next to you, the 中黒 would simply be ignored, with possibly a short pause between the words. If you are reading, say, a dictionary ...


3

It is called a "dash", ダッシュ in Japanese, according to this wikipage. Several usages of the symbol are listed in the page. The usage here is to insert an extra explanation to the sentence (or word before the first dash). You can see that if you take off everything between the two dashes, the sentence is perfectly correct and meaningful. The portion between ...


2

In English typography, there is a practice to substitute two short dashes in order to simulate a long one -- like this -- with or without surrounding spaces, when the stock character is not available in the given typesetting system. What you have there looks like an imitation of the practice, using kanji style dashes. The writer probably thought, "I want to ...


2

Now, in between the words 開発 and 販売 there happens to be a nakaguro. In this context what does it mean? Is it simply a short hand listing for する verbs? (similar to an & sign?) or perhaps it is used to build some special type of compound verbs? According to the Japanese Wikipedia article on 「・」, this mark is mainly used as a divider in compound words. ...


2

Normally, I think there would need to be some sort of connecting form (て、し、り、など)before the comma on your example #2, as noted by Darius Jahandarie. If you do need to combine sentences like in your example #2, you would probably want to find a way to clarify to the reader (or audience) what you are really wanting to say, as well. For example, you might want ...


1

No, きっと means "certainly" here. I don't understand what you find wrong with 'is' in your translation. Insert a 'you' before 'will' and it makes perfect sense.



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