Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

I think さかずき normally refers to something that looks like this: and can also be used as a general term for sake cup, including おちょこ: I think さかづき is probably an archaic way of spelling it in hiragana(or katakana?). Nowadays we normally spell it as さかずき. As for 杯 and 盃... both look okay to me, though I think I learned it as 杯 at school... some people say 盃 ...


2

Well, to start off, お猪口 is the typical cup you see when sake is served hot. It looks kind of like a ceramic shot glass, just with straighter sides and a little shorter. さかずき are flatter and disc-like. As for how to write it, my dictionary confirms the preferences listed in EDICT: 杯 is listed first, followed by 盃. Unless I go to the 国語辞典 within the ...


3

On the pronunciation サ has a length of 1 mora, サァ and サー are both 2 mora. 前の音があ段の音の場合は、長音と同じように扱う。 If an A-row sound precedes it, ァ is treated just like ー. On the usage Usually used in foreign words. 主に外来語や方言において使用される。 Mainly used in foreign or dialectal words. Source http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%81%81 See also ...


8

It's a matter of pitch accent. In a manner somewhat similar to Chinese, Japanese actually has 2 tones that establish its inflectional patterns. They aren't widely taught to foreigners because the patterns vary amongst regions (e.g. Osaka and Tokyo are near-opposite), but one purpose that they do serve is to distinguish between homophones. According to the ...


0

I run Jlearn which is a fairly comprehensive Online Japanese dictionary and has audio for all words and readings for kanji. http://jlearn.net


8

In terms of etymology, みずうみ is indeed derived from two words, but it's now a single word—much like how English housewife is a single word, even though it's clearly derived from house + wife. This doesn't really matter for how you pronounce two /u/ vowels in a row, though. You just hold the sound for an extra beat ("mora"), like it's a long vowel: ...


0

I generally agree with what ssb and Earthlin say, and would add the following thought: consider the potential consequences of using the long vowel marker indiscriminately. It can look an awful lot like the kanji for "one", i.e. 一 (いち). That could potentially be confusing. In many cases, readers could figure it out by context, but by using ~, you very ...



Top 50 recent answers are included