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just chiming in to say the word that nobody hasn't so far: sibilants. sibilants are fricatives with a greater proportion of energy in the higher frequencies. in English, we have at least [s, ʃ, z, ʒ] for sibilant and [f, v, θ, ð ] for non-sibilant fricatives; think of sibilants as 'S-sounds', and the distinction should be clear. the important thing about ...


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This question has a useful answer by Boaz Yaniv which points out that you may simply be mishearing ひ as し, but it misses the fact that some speakers actually do pronounce these the same way! This merger is mentioned briefly in The Phonology of Japanese, Labrune 2012, p.69: For certain speakers, the opposition between /h/ and /s/ is neutralized before i: ...


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It's pronounced [[c̟ɕiʑimete]], although in careful speech it would probably be [[c̟ɕiɟʑimete]]―there's no contrast between [[ʑi]] and [[ɟʑi]] in Modern Japanese, so the word will be understood either way. For the pronunciation of ち and ぢ, see section 4.3 "Affricates" in Vance's The Sounds of Japanese (2008), starting on page 82. Most of this section is ...


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Writing IPA for Japanese is really quite simple in most cases. Look up IPA for Japanese and use the sounds there to write your word. 縮めて [tɕi(d)ʑimeteꜜ] The ꜜ is a tone drop, although here on Japanese.SE we have a fantastic way of writing pitch for かな: ちぢめて【LHHH】. (Correct pitch due to @非回答者.)



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