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13

The entry for 街【がい】 you linked to is: (尾) まちなみ. ▼繁華~ If you take a look at the explanation for the dictionary, we find what (尾) means:  (尾) 接尾語 Ie, it is used at the end of words, and not in isolation. Other dictionaries say がい【街】  (造) ... (造) means almost the same: used only to form words, but not in isolation. ...


10

I'm a native speaker. When you tell a native Japanese speaker to say these words veeeeery slowly, they would say: きょ、う、し、つ。 (or きょ、お、し、つ。) せ、ん、せ、い。 (or せ、ん、せ、え。) か、ら、あ、げ。 こ、ん、ぴゅ、う、た、あ。 (コンピューター) And if you ask "How many 'sounds' are there in those words?", they would count using their fingers, and say 4, 4, 4 and 6, respectively. So this means so-called ...


9

For the place name: おおさか【LHHH】 Reference: See under category 「近畿{きんき}」 in http://accent.u-biq.org/nihon.html For the family name: おおさか【HLLL】 Reference: None found. Just trust me if you could. Hear 「大阪」 pronounced multiple times as a place name by native speakers here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KKb8OoeQp-8 Pitch accents often differ between ...


9

I read it [青水庵]{せいすいあん} if there's no hint. But, I googled this name and found an illustrator (NSFW) who calls himself [青水庵]{あおみずあん}. Why I read せいすいあん first? 庵 can be read as either あん and いおり. In case of this, since 庵 occurs directly after other kanji in a group, the general rule is to read all kanji using the Chinese pronunciation ([音読]{おんよ}み) in ...


8

I'm Japanese native speaker. In my opinion, little "っ" at the end of sentence is not pronounced at all. However, it often indicates "small" (not so serious) emotions of speaker, I'll show you some example, comparing with other two expressions for writing: 01. ふざけんなよっ 02. ふざけんなよ… 03. ふざけるなよ! (All sentences mean "Don't be silly") As you see, first sentence is ...


8

There is a classic extension of this tongue twister that goes like this: 裏庭【うらにわ】には二羽 庭には二羽 ニワトリがいる。 (pronounced as うらにわにわにわにわにわにわにわとりがいる) 裏庭 means backyard.


7

Main Source: コトバンク https://kotobank.jp/word/%E7%87%BB%E3%82%8B-435662#E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.9E.97.20.E7.AC.AC.E4.B8.89.E7.89.88 The example sentences are my own. 「いぶる」 This would be the simplest of the three in the sense that it only has one meaning. It means "to smolder without burning properly". 「[暖炉]{だんろ}がいぶってしまって、うまく[燃]{も}えていない。」= "The fire ...


7

「三分」 can be read in three different ways -- pun, bun, and bu. "Three minutes": 「さんぷん」 "One third": 「さんぶんのいち」(三分の一) "Percentage": 「ぶ」 "My batting average is 230." = 「ボクの[打率]{だりつ}は[二割三分]{にわりさんぶ}です。」


7

It seems that the singer pronounces the english word "saint" instead of the katakana version 「セイント」. It makes sense, since 「セイント」 comes from "saint". As for the questions: The pronunciation is more of a "style" choice rather than a linguistic issue. Wouldn't consider it either one, but like I said, just a stylistic phenomenon.


7

The people in the video are clearly saying いただきます, not いだだきます or いたたきます. Voiced and unvoiced consonants sound totally differently at least to the ears of native Japanese speakers, and I have never seen a native speaker who has difficulty distinguishing them. You may find this answer interesting: http://japanese.stackexchange.com/a/9333/5010


6

Or do native Japanese speaker not think about the implicit association with "east" in the name of their country in a way that would make sense to think of a western counterpart (Japan obviously isn't east or west to anyone who lives there) This is true. Many people know, as a piece of knowledge, that the etymology of 日本 has something to do with east or ...


6

Kanji have two sorts of readings: ON readings (音読み) and kun readings (訓読み). Material that purports to teach you kanji usually indicates ON readings by typesetting them in katakana or (if in romaji) with capital letters. Kun readings are indicated by hiragana. The thumb rules are: If a kanji has okurigana (e.g. 食べる, read た + べる), it is read using its kun ...


5

The most reasonable interpretation in this context is that ∞ stands for 無限大{むげんだい} ("infinity"), in other words, "incalculable(-y large)". ∞ったのは in the second line is, with high probability, a mistype for ∞ってのは (contraction of っていうのは = というのは). With this correction you can read the sentence through as "(Why I wrote) the sign ∞ is for it means..."


5

繁栄 and 反映, 半影, ... are pronounced //haɴeː// without glottal stop and ん as //ɴ//. The combination //ɴ// + vowel is difficult to pronounce, so in some cases, such as 反応【はんのう】, orthography has been adapted to allow for easier pronunciation (although はんおう might still be considered a valid pronunciation). Usually though a word has only a single valid spelling, ...


5

十年前 is じゅうねんまえ. The reading 前【さき】 is rather rare and not used much these days. Also, some newer dictionaries such as the 明鏡国語辞典 do not even list this reading. Just because a fancy kanji is used for a word does not necessarily imply any significant change in meaning. 言う, 云う, 曰う, 謂う, and 道う are all いう and mean pretty much almost the same, but 言う is a lot more ...


5

I think it's half #1, half #2. When a singer (especially female) sings tenderly, some whispering (breathy) feature tends to be blended into the voice, resulting in incomplete voicing. It's a universal phenomenon. The whole phrase in your sound clip has underlying breathing, so in some ways you're true, these are not true voiced consonants. What you hear at ...


5

There is no "w", except in "wa", so you only have to learn that. And it helps to see a Japanese MC on tv with a microphone and a constant toothy grin, while talking furiously. This is an important key, because it demonstrates that Japanese can be spoken without ever moving the lips sideways. So the beginning of the 'wa' syllable is basically done by opening ...


5

Short answer: Japanese has two semivowels, /y/ and /w/. The semivowel /y/ is pronounced like the vowel /i/. The semivowel /w/ is pronounced like the vowel /u/. To say や, try saying いあ /ia/, but focus on transitioning smoothly from one vowel to the other. You'll end up with a や /ya/ sound. Likewise, to say わ, start by saying うあ /ua/, but go smoothly ...


5

木{もく}、火{か}、土{ど}、金{ごん}、水{すい} is correct, as in @virmaior's answer. The reason why these readings are used rather than standard kan'on readings is historical -- the readings used here are actually all go'on (呉音) with the sole exception of 土 which now uses kanyō'on, customary readings from Japan. Below is a bit of history on why go'on are used, but not ...


5

It's つうじょうばん. 版【はん】 = version, edition Although 版 is read as はん by itself, 版 in 通常版 would be read as ばん, due to rendaku phenomenon.


5

[W]hen they say a long vowel, are they deliberately saying one long vowel sound or two of them directly following each other? If this is about phonology, as the tag indicates, the answer will be: two, or neither (at least in Standard Japanese). It's merely two same vowels adjacent by chance when in between two words, or between word stems and ...


4

ゲーシャ (GAY-sha) is the usual pronunciation in Japanese. ギーシャ (GHEE-sha) is not a valid pronunciation in Japanese. I think "geesha" is supposed to be read GHEE-sha and not GAY-sha, whence "Geesha girls" is indeed a mispronunciation and all the English sources you mention talk about the difference ゲー (GAY) vs. ギー (GHEE) and not about the difference between ...


4

There are three differences rhythm たんい has three morae ("syllables"), where as たに has only two. sound たんい has a uvular ("nasal") /ɴ/, i.e. [ta.ɴ.i], whereas たに has a "normal" /n/, i.e. [ta.ni]. pitch たんい【HLL】 drops in pitch after the first mora, たに【LH】 drops in pitch after the second mora. Try to listen for all three differences, they're all important. ...


4

While I hope the time has led the questioner to the correct understanding of this problem, I find it a rather interesting question being asked. It's true that a precise phonetic analysis reveals differences between realizations of the vowel //u// by its environments, or generally, that a vowel's sound quality slightly differs according to its preceding ...


4

The pitch for Sayaka is さやか【HLL】 (or in your notation SAyaka). Also Makoto has pitch まこと【LHH】 and Katsura has pitch かつら【HLL】. Stressing the penultimate syllable is a frequent pronunciation mistake that especially native speakers of English seem to be prone to (but of course not only native English speakers). Stressing the penultimate syllable is one of ...


4

開く actually can be one of two words: 開く{あく} and 開く{ひらく}. These are separate words that have slightly different meanings (but they both typically translate to 'open'). It seems you were thinking of the former, あく, but you actually found the latter, ひらく.


4

Here is what I know as an average, non-linguist and non-teacher dude walking down the street. If, by "complex rules", you refer to more complex ones than these below, I wish one of the experts here would post an answer. By the way, the nasal sound we are discussing here is called 「鼻濁音{びだくおん}」 in case someone did not know. "Nose-muddy-sound", literally. ...


4

Your ears aren't fooling you, but it's not 'mochirong' (with a velar sound as in the English sing). When ん comes on the end of a phrase, it can either be pronounced as nasalization and elongation of the previous vowel, or as a uvular nasal (pronounced in the back of the throat). You use an alveolar nasal before た、な、ざ(but not さ) column kana. Take care that ...


4

Really the pitch accent for each word depends on dialects, but in general it's not actually so hard to understand when somebody talks with different pitch accents, so maybe that's why many textbooks and dictionaries don't write much about the accent for each words. I was born in Tokyo but had army service in Hokkaido, there people refered to me as ...


4

I think it's #1, you heard them wrong. They sound like /d/ and /b/ to me. I'm a non-native speaker, but the /d/ and /b/ don't sound unusual to me.



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