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13

The entry for 街【がい】 you linked to is: (尾) まちなみ. ▼繁華~ If you take a look at the explanation for the dictionary, we find what (尾) means:  (尾) 接尾語 Ie, it is used at the end of words, and not in isolation. Other dictionaries say がい【街】  (造) ... (造) means almost the same: used only to form words, but not in isolation. ...


9

Systems of romanisation which were originally intended to render Japanese in a way that makes it easier for foreigners to pronounce, like Hepburn, will use "shi" and "chi" because those are closer to the correct pronunciation. Other systems, like Kunreisiki, will use "si" and "ti" instead. Which is used where is partly down to what the purpose is - Hepburn ...


9

It's a question somehow unanswered for a fairly long time, while it doesn't seem to be too complicated to answer. If I am reading a Chinese text to a Japanese audience, how can I know which reading to use for each character? Of the 音読み, there can be 呉音, 漢音, and 唐音 to choose from. There are two major types of situation to read Classical Chinese text in ...


8

For the place name: おおさか【LHHH】 Reference: See under category 「近畿{きんき}」 in http://accent.u-biq.org/nihon.html For the family name: おおさか【HLLL】 Reference: None found. Just trust me if you could. Hear 「大阪」 pronounced multiple times as a place name by native speakers here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KKb8OoeQp-8 Pitch accents often differ between ...


8

ソウル is the pronunciation given in the NHK日本語発音アクセント辞典, but both pronunciations are in use; some speakers pronounce it ソール instead. From The Sounds of Japanese (Vance 2008), pages 67-68: Katakana spellings of recent borrowings and foreign proper names with ウ (u) instead of ー (the length mark) do represent /ou/, but these are rare; Souru ソウル 'Seoul' in ...


7

Am I the only one who never says 「少女」? No, you are not. 「少女」 is a fairly big word despite its simple appearance. It is almost never used in informal oral communication among us native speakers, either. You would look pretty weird if you used it in informal speech. As "処女" and "少女" are both nouns, swapping them will not change the grammatical ...


7

I myself definitely would read it as 「プラス」 in that dictionary definition. In math, at least I was taught to read it as 「たす」 in first-grade and continued to do so until I entered junior high school where I was required to read it as 「プラス」. Since then, I have been reading it that way except when talking to kids below junior high age (11 or 12). I may or ...


7

It seems that the singer pronounces the english word "saint" instead of the katakana version 「セイント」. It makes sense, since 「セイント」 comes from "saint". As for the questions: The pronunciation is more of a "style" choice rather than a linguistic issue. Wouldn't consider it either one, but like I said, just a stylistic phenomenon.


7

Main Source: コトバンク https://kotobank.jp/word/%E7%87%BB%E3%82%8B-435662#E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.9E.97.20.E7.AC.AC.E4.B8.89.E7.89.88 The example sentences are my own. 「いぶる」 This would be the simplest of the three in the sense that it only has one meaning. It means "to smolder without burning properly". 「[暖炉]{だんろ}がいぶってしまって、うまく[燃]{も}えていない。」= "The fire ...


7

「三分」 can be read in three different ways -- pun, bun, and bu. "Three minutes": 「さんぷん」 "One third": 「さんぶんのいち」(三分の一) "Percentage": 「ぶ」 "My batting average is 230." = 「ボクの[打率]{だりつ}は[二割三分]{にわりさんぶ}です。」


6

As a general rule, yes loan words are pronounced just as they are written. I say general rule because I have noticed bilingual announcers on the radio who mix English and Japanese do sometimes insert the original pronunciation into their Japanese sentences. As far as your name is concerned, yes it would be normal to say it as you write it in katakana: ...


6

Or do native Japanese speaker not think about the implicit association with "east" in the name of their country in a way that would make sense to think of a western counterpart (Japan obviously isn't east or west to anyone who lives there) This is true. Many people know, as a piece of knowledge, that the etymology of 日本 has something to do with east or ...


6

It was probably borrowed from English pronunciation: American English British English Letter pronunciation /ˌjuː ef ˈoʊ/ /ˌjuː ef ˈəʊ/ Word pronunciation /ˈjuːfoʊ/ /ˈjuːfəʊ/ On the top, we have the pronunciation in IPA of the three letters UFO, one after the other. Where does the bottom ...


6

When talking about shi (and absence of si), to say "there is no si but shi in Japanese" is not really correct. The truth would rather be "there is no distinction between si and shi in Japanese". In other words, there is only one such "voiceless sibilant" phoneme in Japanese, which is usually written as /s/, and さしすせそ are phonemically parsed as /sa si su se ...


6

「田中家」 is pronounced as 「たなかけ (Tanaka-ke)」. Usually, this word is used to refer to a family whose last names are 田中 or a house where a 田中 family live in. (ref. http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/leaf/jn2/65854/m0u/) While 「田中家 (Tanaka-ke)」 sounds formally, 「田中ん家 (Tanaka-n-chi)」 sounds informally and seems to refer a family or a house of a speakers friend. A kanji ...


5

The main two factors in transcription from English to Japanese are (Japanese perception of) pronunciation in English spelling in English Transcribing au as オー is the norm (note the lengthening!): audio オーディオ auction オークション Australia オーストラリア Austria オーストリア audition オーディション automatic オートマ (abbr.) aura オーラ


5

I think 学際 is the only standard translation of interdisciplinary (at least according to the dictionary). Although it is easy to imagine what 超域 means, this word is unfamiliar to me at least as a name of an academic field. And apparently there are very few Japanese university departments with 超域 in their names. I feel there is no meaningful difference ...


5

繁栄 and 反映, 半影, ... are pronounced //haɴeː// without glottal stop and ん as //ɴ//. The combination //ɴ// + vowel is difficult to pronounce, so in some cases, such as 反応【はんのう】, orthography has been adapted to allow for easier pronunciation (although はんおう might still be considered a valid pronunciation). Usually though a word has only a single valid spelling, ...


5

I can answer for the examples given. We have to go back to their origin as Sino-Japanese terms, and in particular to their Chinese pronunciation. Now I can't actually go back to the Middle Chinese pronunciation the Japanese reading reflects, but Wiktionary may. In any case, if you take the final characters, you can see on the MDBG Chinese to English ...


5

This question has a useful answer by Boaz Yaniv which points out that you may simply be mishearing ひ as し, but it misses the fact that some speakers actually do pronounce these the same way! This merger is mentioned briefly in The Phonology of Japanese, Labrune 2012, p.69: For certain speakers, the opposition between /h/ and /s/ is neutralized before i: ...


5

It all depends the numbers immediately preceding 「分」. 「ふん Hun」: 2, 5, 7, 9 and 00. 「ぷん Pun」: 1, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, etc. Examples: 「ふん Hun」: 32分(さんじゅうにふん)、15分(じゅうごふん)、57分(ごじゅうななふん)、9分(きゅうふん)、4-5分(しごふん [Only number 5, not number 4, affects the way 分 is pronounced.]) 「ぷん Pun」: ...


5

Actually, what you mentioned are not old and new pronunciations. Both are contemporary ones. The "irohanihoheto..." is reading its letter names, while "irowa nioedo..." one, as a meaningful poem. The difference is much clearer if you try the same thing in English alphabet, say, "Cwm fjord bank glyphs vext quiz." (a perfect pangram from Wikipedia), where ...


5

I think you've mixed up two different things: voicing in compound words (連濁) deaspiration in non-initial position The first one is a grammar rather than pronunciation. In most cases, whether the voicing happens or not is determined by word, and the kana spelling always reflects the pronunciation change i.e. 雲 (くも) → 雨雲 (あまぐも), 雷雲 (かみなりぐも), 浮き雲 (うきぐも) ...


5

十年前 is じゅうねんまえ. The reading 前【さき】 is rather rare and not used much these days. Also, some newer dictionaries such as the 明鏡国語辞典 do not even list this reading. Just because a fancy kanji is used for a word does not necessarily imply any significant change in meaning. 言う, 云う, 曰う, 謂う, and 道う are all いう and mean pretty much almost the same, but 言う is a lot more ...


4

The pitch for Sayaka is さやか【HLL】 (or in your notation SAyaka). Also Makoto has pitch まこと【LHH】 and Katsura has pitch かつら【HLL】. Stressing the penultimate syllable is a frequent pronunciation mistake that especially native speakers of English seem to be prone to (but of course not only native English speakers). Stressing the penultimate syllable is one of ...


4

It's pronounced [[c̟ɕiʑimete]], although in careful speech it would probably be [[c̟ɕiɟʑimete]]―there's no contrast between [[ʑi]] and [[ɟʑi]] in Modern Japanese, so the word will be understood either way. For the pronunciation of ち and ぢ, see section 4.3 "Affricates" in Vance's The Sounds of Japanese (2008), starting on page 82. Most of this section is ...


4

Both exactly means "interdiscipline(-ary)" here. Japanese vocabulary doesn't have a word that can translate "discipline", you can only refer to it by saying "academic field" 学問分野 or "specialized field" 専門分野 etc. Thus if you want to make a two-part compound like "inter" + "discipline", you have to think of a workaround. 学際{がくさい} is a solution based on the ...


4

As for the pronunciation, read as it is written in katakana. There is no special rule you have to consider. However, both コップ and カップ are commonly used in Japanese, and that may be the source of confusion. So let's see the difference. コップ: pronounced as KOPPU. This roughly corresponds to a mug, but can refer to a cylinder-shaped cup made of glass like ...


4

I don't agree with what you were told about it. Of course in rapid speaking consonants tend to be pronounced rather roughly, and it may be prominent especially in non-initial consonants, but still voiceless consonants (k, t, ts, etc.) have to be distingushed from voiced ones (g, d, z, etc.) in Japanese. For example in this conversation: A: ...


4

ゲーシャ (GAY-sha) is the usual pronunciation in Japanese. ギーシャ (GHEE-sha) is not a valid pronunciation in Japanese. I think "geesha" is supposed to be read GHEE-sha and not GAY-sha, whence "Geesha girls" is indeed a mispronunciation and all the English sources you mention talk about the difference ゲー (GAY) vs. ギー (GHEE) and not about the difference between ...



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