Hot answers tagged

14

I share your experience. Sticking straight to the katakana pronunciation below, I have never had the problem of someone not understanding me any more. I believe this is the pronunciation currently taught in Japanese schools. A: エー【HL】 B: ビー【HL】 C: シー【HL】 D: ディー【HHL】 E: イー【HL】 F: エフ【HL】 G: ジー【HL】 H: エイチ【HLL】 I: アイ【HL】 J: ジェー【HHL】 K: ケー【HL】 L: エル【HL】 M: エム【HL】...


5

I agree with Earthliŋ for the most part. Though I have never heard of Japanese students being taught and official "Katakana-ized" version of the English alphabet. Generally they seem to be taught to imitate native pronunciation as closely as possible. I use and hear the following variations regularly: Disclaimer: I live in Kansai. A - エイ D - ディー or デー (...


4

The vowel drop described in your textbook happens between consonants. However, even though the vowel is dropped, the rhythm of the word isn't changed. [[s.ki.de.s]] ↔ [[su.ki.de.su]] (the dot . denotes separation of syllables). You cannot do the same with the [[i]] in かわいいです [[ka.wa.i.i.de.s(u)]] or うれしいです. (I don't understand your comment about ...


2

The vowels aren't "dropped"; they simply become voiceless, which is explained (poorly) to English speakers as being "dropped" because the concept of voiceless vowels doesn't exist in English. In these two examples, the い is voiced in both cases. For かわいい, the voicing of わ means that the first い is voiced, and thus the adjacent final い must also be voiced. ...


2

With the writing reform almost most instances of the old ぢ・ヂ and づ・ヅ have been replaced with the homophonic じ・ジ and ず・ズ with the following exceptions: ぢ・ヂ and づ・ヅ are still used in words containing a voiced repeated ち or つ (i.e. one that could be written with a voiced iteration mark ゞ), e.g. ちぢむ(縮む) つづく(続く) ぢ・ヂ and づ・ヅ may appear as a result of ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible