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9

In everyday conversations, it's always read as かず. But in mathematical contexts, 数 on its own is usually read as すう. すう becomes dominant in math classes after you graduate from elementary school and start saying things like these. 負【ふ】の数【すう】 negative number 複素数【ふくそすう】とは実数【じっすう】 a, b と虚数【きょすう】単位【たんい】 i を用いて、 a + bi の形で表すことのできる 数【すう】 である。 A ...


7

広辞苑 states: 「つね【常】①かわらないこと。永久不変。(副詞的にも用いる)」 So I would read it as 「つね くらい ちくりんが あり・・・」


2

You can definitely make yourself understood by saying 「もう1つ?」 with rising intonation, but it's better to use the appropriate counter for bottles ("本"). And we usually add some verb even in the most casual settings. To your friend, colloquially: もう[1本]{いっぽん}[行]{い}く? (行く ≒ "go on" here) もう1本いる? もう1本[飲]{の}む? If you have to say this politely: もう1本お[飲]{の}...


2

常暗い【つね くらい】 means "always dark"


1

Though 薄暗い is an everyday word and 常闇 is an established word, there is no word that reads 常暗い, at least as a common word in Japanese language. Neither 広辞苑 nor 大辞林 at hand carries 常暗 as a noun as well as 常暗い as an adjective. If you found it, it must be a coinage of the author or weird resurrection of a long-ago dead word at best. In my lifespun of 83 years ...


1

In that situation, we would use, "もう[一本]{いっぽん}". [助数詞]{じょすうし} can be quite confusing even to native Japanese speakers sometimes. Once the beer is poured into a glass, it becomes 「[一杯]{いっぱい}」. I would say 「[一つ]{ひとつ}」 is usually used for solid objects, but it's not applicable to all solid objects, though. Here are links which might be helpful for you to get ...


1

I have never seen this word and it seems to be an occasional or creative word usage by the writer. I'd read とこぐらい or とこくらい that would mean "ever-shady". とこ【常】 [語素]名詞・形容詞などに付いて、いつも変わらない、永久不変の、などの意を表す。「―夏」「―世」「―めずらし」 (morpheme) mainly attached to nouns or adjectives to indicate "unchanging" or "permanent". For reference, the 新潮文庫 edition of ...



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