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12

The entry for 街【がい】 you linked to is: (尾) まちなみ. ▼繁華~ If you take a look at the explanation for the dictionary, we find what (尾) means:  (尾) 接尾語 Ie, it is used at the end of words, and not in isolation. Other dictionaries say がい【街】  (造) ... (造) means almost the same: used only to form words, but not in isolation. ...


5

十年前 is じゅうねんまえ. The reading 前【さき】 is rather rare and not used much these days. Also, some newer dictionaries such as the 明鏡国語辞典 do not even list this reading. Just because a fancy kanji is used for a word does not necessarily imply any significant change in meaning. 言う, 云う, 曰う, 謂う, and 道う are all いう and mean pretty much almost the same, but 言う is a lot more ...


4

ゲーシャ (GAY-sha) is the usual pronunciation in Japanese. ギーシャ (GHEE-sha) is not a valid pronunciation in Japanese. I think "geesha" is supposed to be read GHEE-sha and not GAY-sha, whence "Geesha girls" is indeed a mispronunciation and all the English sources you mention talk about the difference ゲー (GAY) vs. ギー (GHEE) and not about the difference between ...


4

There are three differences rhythm たんい has three morae ("syllables"), where as たに has only two. sound たんい has a uvular ("nasal") /ɴ/, i.e. [ta.ɴ.i], whereas たに has a "normal" /n/, i.e. [ta.ni]. pitch たんい【HLL】 drops in pitch after the first mora, たに【LH】 drops in pitch after the second mora. Try to listen for all three differences, they're all important. ...


3

Everything's pretty much been answered, but I just wanted to add that to the average Japanese speaker, 「さき」would refer to 「先【さき】」(ahead). So saying 十年先【じゅうねんさき】would mean "10 years from now". Note: 先【さき】 is confusing because saying when used alone it means "before" but when combined with time it means "ahead", but I'll leave it at that since it's off-topic. ...


2

In the real Japanese-speaking world, 「えい」 and 「おう」 only exist in orthography, not in pronunciation for most native speakers on most occasions. Those are pronounced like「えー」 and 「おー」 respectively. So, 「げえしゃ」 is would be a fairly valid pronunciation, if not as much so as 「げーしゃ」. In fact, these irregularities, together with particles 「は」 and 「を」 are often ...


2

When っ or its katakana counterpart ッ appears word-finally, it's commonly a glottal stop //ʔ// or an implosive, "unreleased" stop at some other point of articulation, for me usually implosive //k//. Glottal stops appear in English too, most common example being "uh-oh". First English word I can think of which has an implosive stop is "yep". EDIT: Update as ...


1

単{たん}is pronounced たん and 位{い}is pronounced い. Together, they are pronounced たんい or tann-i. This is distinctly different from に or ni. For example, 谷{たに}is pronounced たに or tani. I don't know phonetic symbols so I apologize but you can sound these two out to hear how they are different.


1

(Expanding on my comments; this post only covers the spelling part rather than any pronunciation confusion you may have had.) I'm told that the unvoiced k-row sounds and t-row sounds are often pronounced as voiced g- and d- sounds when they are not appearing as the first sound of words. Kanji have on readings (音読み, Chinese-derived ones) and kun ...



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