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19

It is in a slightly different order in Japanese. First comes Celsius, then the amount, and degrees at the end. This would be one hundred degrees Celsius written out: 摂氏{せっし}100度{ど} Fahrenheit for example would be similar 華氏{かし}100度{ど} Most of the time saying Celsius is redundant though. If someone asks you what is the temperature, you can just ...


11

The reading depends on the situation. In a scientific or technical environment Chris's answer is 100% correct. However, in conversational non-technical situations it is read differently. When speaking with someone you can say [度シー]{どしー} for Celsius. However, in Japan the standard for expressing temperature is metric, so there is no need to clarify that ...


5

We say usually only 度 like 100度 because only Celsius is commonly used in Japan, so we don't need to say 摂氏.


5

思う is pronounced "omou" with a distinct "u" sound rather than a long "o" because there is a morpheme barrier between the "o" and the "u."


3

It is "omou" not "omoo" at least I've actually heard it pronounced this way. In 1 word "oo" or "ou" both are long "o". In two words put together, you have to know how they are pronounced seperatly and it doesn't really change. If you have a verb ending in ou then the final u will be "u" not "o". When I have doubts about the pronunciation of a word I ...


3

激情 should never be pronounced with voiceless fricative like "shou" as you say. If you mouth it "gekishou," it turns out to be 激賞 meaning "high praise," or 劇症 meaning an acute symptom of disease, like fulminant hepatitis. 情 either as its own, or in combined-form like 情熱 (passion)、情緒 (emotion)、熱情 (ardor), 情実 (personal considerations /motives)、情趣 (feeling ...


2

You have such a good ear, don't you? According to my personal observation, in this case it's not that like free or conditional variants, but rather loose (lax) pronunciation of interjections. And I suspect what you heard are not more open but more mid-centralized (there may be generation gaps, but I'm not sure...). While the regular //e// and //o// in ...



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