Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

It's a question somehow unanswered for a fairly long time, while it doesn't seem to be too complicated to answer. If I am reading a Chinese text to a Japanese audience, how can I know which reading to use for each character? Of the 音読み, there can be 呉音, 漢音, and 唐音 to choose from. There are two major types of situation to read Classical Chinese text in ...


8

Am I the only one who never says 「少女」? No, you are not. 「少女」 is a fairly big word despite its simple appearance. It is almost never used in informal oral communication among us native speakers, either. You would look pretty weird if you used it in informal speech. As "処女" and "少女" are both nouns, swapping them will not change the grammatical ...


6

「田中家」 is pronounced as 「たなかけ (Tanaka-ke)」. Usually, this word is used to refer to a family whose last names are 田中 or a house where a 田中 family live in. (ref. http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/leaf/jn2/65854/m0u/) While 「田中家 (Tanaka-ke)」 sounds formally, 「田中ん家 (Tanaka-n-chi)」 sounds informally and seems to refer a family or a house of a speakers friend. A kanji ...


5

It all depends the numbers immediately preceding 「分」. 「ふん Hun」: 2, 5, 7, 9 and 00. 「ぷん Pun」: 1, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, etc. Examples: 「ふん Hun」: 32分(さんじゅうにふん)、15分(じゅうごふん)、57分(ごじゅうななふん)、9分(きゅうふん)、4-5分(しごふん [Only number 5, not number 4, affects the way 分 is pronounced.]) 「ぷん Pun」: ...


5

Actually, what you mentioned are not old and new pronunciations. Both are contemporary ones. The "irohanihoheto..." is reading its letter names, while "irowa nioedo..." one, as a meaningful poem. The difference is much clearer if you try the same thing in English alphabet, say, "Cwm fjord bank glyphs vext quiz." (a perfect pangram from Wikipedia), where ...


3

The あ is pronounced separately, like "meh-ah-ri".1 This will always be the case for sequences like メア, ケア, エア, etc. For the most part, vowels in katakana loan words are only lengthened by the vowel-lengthening mark "ー" (which I just learned is called 長音符【ちょうおんぷ】). For example: アードバーク "aardvark", イーストウィック "Eastwick", 烏龍【ウーロン】 "Oolong", エース "ace", オークション ...


2

I think you've mixed up two different things: voicing in compound words (連濁) deaspiration in non-initial position The first one is a grammar rather than pronunciation. In most cases, whether the voicing happens or not is determined by word, and the kana spelling always reflects the pronunciation change i.e. 雲 (くも) → 雨雲 (あまぐも), 雷雲 (かみなりぐも), 浮き雲 (うきぐも) ...


2

I don't agree with what you were told about it. Of course in rapid speaking consonants tend to be pronounced rather roughly, and it may be prominent especially in non-initial consonants, but still voiceless consonants (k, t, ts, etc.) have to be distingushed from voiced ones (g, d, z, etc.) in Japanese. For example in this conversation: A: ...


1

I'm a native Japanese speaker, and I definitely can't tell the difference between g and ng. I grew up in the Kanto region, and I'm not sure if I use the g and the ng interchangeably or not. I might know how to pronounce the ng, I'm not sure. But anyway, how you make a sound in Japanese isn't as important as using the correct intonation, which might be ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible