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8

Yes, there are several. あたし This is just a casual form of わたし used very commonly by young women. However, it has a more "adult" feel to it then うち, as I feel women between 20 to 40 yrs old use it more. うち This would be second on the list of most common, especially with young teenagers. I wouldn't expect a women past 30 yrs+ to use this form. It ...


7

〜たち is a suffix which means more or less "the group to which <someone> belongs". So ぼくたち refers to the speaker as ぼく, but it also refers to the group to which they belong, and it can be used as long as ぼく is appropriate for that one person. In other words, it's not a "plural" marker, so it doesn't matter whether the group is mixed-gender or not. ...


5

It is perfectly normal for ぼくたち to refer to mixed-gender groups. For example, when I talk to a third person about something my wife and I are going to do together, I say ぼくたち. Generally, when referring to groups of single or mixed gender of which they are a member, males use ぼくたち (or some other masculine variant like おれたち) and females use わたしたち (or another ...


4

`Not everyone is here.' is translated into すべての人がここにいるのではない。 Here 「すべて~ではない」is a partial negation. `Everyne is not here' is translated into すべての人がここにいない。(i.e. 誰もいない) Here「すべて~ない」is a total negation. If you are familiar with formal language representations :-), We can interpret the above situation as below: When P(x)≡[x is here], Not everyone is ...


3

Well, it actually would not be terribly common for a wife to call her husband お前 in the first place (at least in public), I think. The other way around seems perfectly believable to me though. Anyways, in trying to understand why your professor may have been upset by that, all I can guess is that she considers お前 to be so jarringly incorrect for whomever ...


3

"Not everything is X" is the same logically as "Some things (exist which) are not X", so in the general case you can do something like 青くないものもある there also exist things that are not blue = some of them aren't blue = not every one of them is blue Unfortunately, for the "is here" case, where our verb is いる, that would give us something like ...


2

If you know the other party's name or title, by all means use it. Otherwise, omitting the pronoun as @dainichi suggests is the best idea, if possible. However, when you don't know the person you're talking to and you must use something, あなた is perfectly acceptable. For example, it is commonly used to refer to website visitors, or to the person filling out a ...



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