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5

I think この usually implies some quality of “me”. You can translate it as “someone like me”. You can insert some adjectives between この and <first person pronoun>. Usually it sounds proud or arrogant, especially in このオレさま. フン、この(偉大なる)ヤング様に勝負を挑むなど、百年早いわ! 天才美少女であるこのアタシが教えてあげるんだから、ありがたく思いなさい! But as Hyperworm pointed out, it can be used in exactly the ...


4

Over on Linguistics.SE, there's a question about the difference between deixis and anaphora: What is the difference between “anaphora” and “deixis”? The linguist John Lawler posted a short comment there with a simple explanation. It's short, but in this case I think it tells you just about everything you need to know: Very simple distinction: First ...


3

Well, it actually would not be terribly common for a wife to call her husband お前 in the first place (at least in public), I think. The other way around seems perfectly believable to me though. Anyways, in trying to understand why your professor may have been upset by that, all I can guess is that she considers お前 to be so jarringly incorrect for whomever ...


3

"The guy standing here in front of you" "This guy here" "The guy you're looking at" "This guy" "Me here" Update Some clarification as noted by the commenters. Yes, オレ and 僕 or course refer to the speaker. So the question is, what is the nuance introduced by the demonstrative adjective この? It is "this me", as opposed to some other "me", such as a "me" ...


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Just intended as a small remark: the use of お前 does by no means necessarily imply domestic violence, but domestic violence does definitely imply the husband referring to the wife as お前. Maybe this puts it somewhat into perspective.


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Neither of those are common-use pronouns, but for different reasons - one isn't common-use, the other isn't a pronoun. I'll explain. 我が輩 is a relatively unusual first-person pronoun. It is used in exactly two contexts: When a male speaker wants to sound stuck-up and self-important - almost always in fiction, and often with noticeably more literary speech ...



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