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6

「来年【らいねん】日本へ行【い】くと言いました」 can mean (but is not limited to): I said I will go to Japan next year. He/she said he/she will go to Japan next year. I said he/she will go to Japan next year. (ie, I told someone else that he/she will go to Japan) You said you will go to Japan next year. (a bit hard to think of a context where this interpretation is suitable, but ...


4

It's common to use ちゃん regardless of their sex when they're are very small... roughly under 6 years old or so. http://oshiete.goo.ne.jp/qa/983087.html 平均的なところでは, ○未就学児は男女問わず「ちゃん」 ○小学生~高校生は男子が「君」,女子が「さん」 ○大学生以上の学生,社会人(18歳未満でも)は「さん」 ○ただし政治面など硬めのニュースでは男女問わず「氏」


4

You have to guess, based on what is most likely the intended meaning. Let's try to translate literally as much as possible and I'll try to demonstrate what I mean... For the two examples that you gave: 日本{にほん}に行{い}ったら日本語{にほんご}を習{なら}う when go to Japan / will learn Japanese トマトやりんごを投{な}げた threw tomatoes and apples In English, these ...


4

First of all, general second person pronouns like あなた and 君 are less frequently seen in Japanese sentences, and actual person names can be used even when you're in front of that person. I think you already know this. ○○さんの出身はどこですか。 Where are you from, ○○-san? ○○さんも一緒に来ますか? Will you come together, too, ○○-san? Addressing the person in front of you ...


4

First, I'd like to explain the whole scheme concerning personal pronouns. You are supposed to use Standard Japanese when you speak in public or formal situations and in this case, you basically use 私 (derived from old Tokyo) only. Otherwise, you speak in a dialect of your own. In many areas including most populated ones, people speak New Tokyo dialect, ...


3

I'd say that this is the most common pronoun among college and older males I wouldn't say it's the most common one, but in a manly/friendly/aggressive environment you might encounter it. In real life speech it's not as common as 僕 and 私 since there are a lot less situations where you can use 俺 safely. It is used a lot on the internet, though. It's the most ...


3

If you haven't read this question, please check it first: What's the difference between wa (は) and ga (が)? Whether a noun is already in the universe of discourse is very important, but that's not the only thing that determines when to use が or は. There are at least three types of situation where が must be used with 彼 (or more generally, nouns which are ...


2

さん is the most common courtesy title to be used for both males and females. It’s like Mr., Mrs., and Miss. ちゃん is more casual and intimate form of さん, which is used between or among close friends and colleagues of both male and female, and notably among children. But, ちゃん is neither gender or age specific. I’m 83 year-old man and called as "Oishi-san" in ...


2

In most situations I feel that あの人 is very neutral, with no hidden nuances. Consider the other options: Name/Title: This is most versatile, in that it is most polite and most neutral at the same time. Can't go wrong with this. But then again, it isn't a pronoun, and at some point in the conversation you're going to use a pronoun. 彼/彼女: A lot of people ...


2

It almost doesn't make sense. He/she may want to keep me isolated, but it's still nonsensical. Otherwise, in everyday conversation, we'd use この人 when he's an adult, この子 when he's young, この方 when he should be respected and こいつ when he's a close friend. 彼・彼女 are bookish words and we'd use them in public or in formal situations.


1

You can look at the verb it's used with. Examples: 自分でやります - I will do it myself 自分でやってください - Please do it yourself



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