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14

Refinement is a reflection of the speaker, not the listener. While an opposing baron would use 「貴様」, a thug would use 「手前」.


8

Yes, young children and young women often refer to themselves by their first name. There is the notion that it is cute and women will use it when talking to close family members, etc. If an adult male would use it, it would sound very effeminate. Also, when an adult women uses it, some people consider that she is trying to look cute on purpose and be turned ...


8

Yes, there are several. あたし This is just a casual form of わたし used very commonly by young women. However, it has a more "adult" feel to it then うち, as I feel women between 20 to 40 yrs old use it more. うち This would be second on the list of most common, especially with young teenagers. I wouldn't expect a women past 30 yrs+ to use this form. It ...


7

〜たち is a suffix which means more or less "the group to which <someone> belongs". So ぼくたち refers to the speaker as ぼく, but it also refers to the group to which they belong, and it can be used as long as ぼく is appropriate for that one person. In other words, it's not a "plural" marker, so it doesn't matter whether the group is mixed-gender or not. ...


7

To add a little bit more to what YOU said in his answer: in some Classical Japanese texts これ was indeed used as a first (and also second) person pronoun. It's not the most common first person pronoun in Classical Japanese (that would probably be われ), but it's a possible use, so maybe that's where your dictionary got that from. The quote from 枕草子 (The Pillow ...


7

For your question of how to say "you" without being rude in a context where you're not sure of the person's name or your status relationship, you can say 「そちら」. As for when to use あなた, this might seem a little odd, but think of あなた as like calling someone "dude". You use it between friends. You can say it to strangers, but only if you're trying to convey ...


7

This is what dictionary@goo says about あなた: 対等または目下の者に対して、丁寧に、または親しみをこめていう。 妻が夫に対して、軽い敬意や親しみをこめてい。 In definition (1), it's said that あなた is used for second person who is equivalent or subordinate/inferior/junior while being polite or intimate/familiar. Definition (2) states that it can also be used between spouses to intimately call each ...


7

If nothing else, /teme:/ is Tokyo (shitamachi) dialect, while /kisama/ is standard Japanese. Refinement doesn't necessarily correlate with politeness; "ignorant oaf" might be considered more refined than "top bloke."


6

Update: I didn't comment on the fact that speaking about oneself can also be a matter of using "he" or "she" for oneself, as well as using one's own name. I have never heard anyone in Japanese use 彼【かれ】(he) or 彼女【かのじょ】(she) to refer to themselves. As far as I can tell, it has more or less the same implications that it would in English, and you can follow ...


6

There is a lot going on in this. The biggest problem is the fact that the structure of the example sentence you found is a bit more advanced than you are used to. The example sentence is right. If you were to break it down 食べている = currently eating 人は = "a person" [the は marks the "person" the focus of the question] います = exists か = ? ...


5

It is perfectly normal for ぼくたち to refer to mixed-gender groups. For example, when I talk to a third person about something my wife and I are going to do together, I say ぼくたち. Generally, when referring to groups of single or mixed gender of which they are a member, males use ぼくたち (or some other masculine variant like おれたち) and females use わたしたち (or another ...


5

In informal settings, you might use あたし達, to your parents-in-law you might use 私達, and in business settings, you might use 我々 or 私共. It can depend on many things, including possibly your gender, but it doesn't generally depend on whether there is somebody of the other gender in the group you refer to. The Japanese plural marker 達 as well as ら and others ...


5

I think この usually implies some quality of “me”. You can translate it as “someone like me”. You can insert some adjectives between この and <first person pronoun>. Usually it sounds proud or arrogant, especially in このオレさま. フン、この(偉大なる)ヤング様に勝負を挑むなど、百年早いわ! 天才美少女であるこのアタシが教えてあげるんだから、ありがたく思いなさい! But as Hyperworm pointed out, it can be used in exactly the ...


4

You can use こちら (the humble form of ここ) to refer to yourself (and your in-group). It's not exactly これ but it's close. I would say this is most often heard in the phrase こちらこそ, used after someone thanks you to say something along the lines of, "The pleasure was all mine." See definition #3, given as synonymous with 自分(たち). I tend to use it in situations that ...


4

Yes it can be used to nominate yourself in specific situations. I see two main cases. case 1: Do something for someone but in a question. as you tried to explain, But can I also use this to nominate myself to go? For example if a group of people were together and it was decided that only one person needed to go somewhere would it be correct to say "私が行こう"? ...


4

I think that would be おれ 「俺」, and actually most frequently used first person pronoun for males in Japan currently when speaking. The one you found in dictionary might be from まくらそうし「枕草子」 at Middle Heian-Era (around 1000 Years ago) but I don't think that one is in used recently. or これ or こら has another meaning like "Hey" これ,静かにしろ  Hey, be quiet! Note: ...


4

I suggest you read this thread: In actual Japanese society, how often are second-person pronouns used? As I replied there, I would suggest avoiding 2nd person pronouns (including あなた) completely, unless you're absolutely sure what you're doing. As you say yourself, it's common to use the name of title of the person you're talking to, so the only trouble ...


4

Decent usage for "giving something to oneself" would be "自分へのご褒美する" And regarding あげる and くれる for those, you can't use くれる, because 自分にプレゼントをくれた, still means someone gave you present.


4

食べている人はいますか? Literally translated this means: "Are there people who are eating?" This basically means the same thing as "Is anyone eating?" The first translation is unnatural in colloquial English, while the second one would be the natural way to say it. Your attempt seems correct to me (minus the が). However, another interpretation of 誰でも could be ...


4

`Not everyone is here.' is translated into すべての人がここにいるのではない。 Here 「すべて~ではない」is a partial negation. `Everyne is not here' is translated into すべての人がここにいない。(i.e. 誰もいない) Here「すべて~ない」is a total negation. If you are familiar with formal language representations :-), We can interpret the above situation as below: When P(x)≡[x is here], Not everyone is ...


4

Over on Linguistics.SE, there's a question about the difference between deixis and anaphora: What is the difference between “anaphora” and “deixis”? The linguist John Lawler posted a short comment there with a simple explanation. It's short, but in this case I think it tells you just about everything you need to know: Very simple distinction: First ...


3

Just being curious: where did you learn about the correctness of the two first ones? I can't recall hearing anything like that ever. In a similar way, even if gramatically correct, your other sentences with the "I" subject feel very unnatural to me. I believe that a natural way to express self rewarding would be: "プレセントを買わせてもらいましょう", where context and ...


3

This is just my personal opinion, but I thought I'd share it. I don't think 私は私にプレゼントをあげた / 僕は僕にプレゼントをあげた are correct, because you can't あげる something to 私. You would have to もらう or くれる it. On the other hand, I see 私は自分にプレゼントをあげた as possibly being grammatically correct, as 自分 is a reflexive pronoun — different from 私 and 僕 which are non-reflexive. ...


3

I would argue that there is a correspondence between the two languages with all three viewpoints. There are pronouns that are commonly used for the first, second, and third person just like in English; however, there is a bit of a cultural difference on when it is appropriate to address someone by name or a more informal second-person pronoun like "you". ...


3

You are over analysing. English and Japanese often do not translate word for word (no matter how much you try to make them do so!) A thorough analysis of this sentence (which I am sure you don't need but we might aswell) would be: 食べている人(person eating - modified noun) は(topic marker)います(present - animate word for existence)か?(question mark) In English ...


3

Well, it actually would not be terribly common for a wife to call her husband お前 in the first place (at least in public), I think. The other way around seems perfectly believable to me though. Anyways, in trying to understand why your professor may have been upset by that, all I can guess is that she considers お前 to be so jarringly incorrect for whomever ...


3

"Not everything is X" is the same logically as "Some things (exist which) are not X", so in the general case you can do something like 青くないものもある there also exist things that are not blue = some of them aren't blue = not every one of them is blue Unfortunately, for the "is here" case, where our verb is いる, that would give us something like ...



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