New answers tagged

2

The potential for rudeness in this sentence will depend upon a combined number of factors: setting, status, enunciation, race, and gender. (More are possible, but I will only cover these.) Setting: if you are in a classroom setting, host family, or other 'protected learning' environment, this will not likely be perceived as rude. Other settings could be ...


4

There are similar sentences that are used in confrontational settings or in order to insult somebody (e.g. お前らどこのもんじゃ or お前らどっからきたんじゃ, basically it amounts to "You stranger!" or "What kind of inferior group do you come from?"), so that similarity might be the reason. Though there are certainly situations where it's completely fine. E.g. 「今日はどこから来たんですか?」(...


6

Order is not really important in most cases. Sentence 1 and Sentence 2 sound almost the same to my ears in the Japanese versions. BCCWJ Corpus has roughly the same number of examples of 私とあなた (43 hits) vs あなたと私 (35 hits). And "order in a list of people is important" is what I learned in English classes at school :D I vaguely feel that order can be important ...


3

You are on the right track, but as someone has commented your conjugations need some work. However, I'll give you what I would suggest is a natural way to ask this. ドラムを叩き始めてどれくらいになりますか? I think you could replace 叩き始めて with simply 叩いて, but I think the above is more clear. Besides your issues with です and ます, you don't need to use 貴方. Often in Japanese ...


0

I'd agree with the firstname-san in direct-greeting and 3rd-party mentions , although once conversation is going i'd reckon any usual kochira-sochira patterns and (not-even-necessarily) relational titles (ojisan/obasan, uncle/auntie etc, possibly dropping the o and even perhaps the san later if the folk are friendly and the meeting/circumstances casual) for ...


1

In earlier time, say pre- or mid-war Japan, people were more conscious of whom, when and where they should use 丁寧語, 謙譲語, 尊敬語 and distinction of their usages. But it seems people are not so serious today in observing the rules of the verbal locutions of expressing politeness, humiliation and respect. In fact, there is a prevailing phenomenon of “ため口をきく” ...


8

This question is largely about culture but a place where culture and language interact. I work at a university in Japan and both on and off campus, we call each other 苗字 (family name)-先生. There's one or two exceptions where a 高橋 goes by her first name (one of four takahashi's). Japan is a relationally organized society, and the manner in which you know the ...


8

Normally when the Japanese company workers go out for the 飲み会(party) with their Manager or Boss they call them 部長 or 社長 only. In the same way your students will call you as ~先生 even after they graduated/move to higher education. Usually it's difficult for you to call it as 田中さん because you used 田中先生 all the time to call him/her. However if you're friend ...


0

I usually hear "である" in formal situations but when the speaker is not addressing anyone in particular, but is just making a statement. What sazarando means by "polite" is situations where the speaker is addressing someone in particular (often someone right in front of them or on the phone). And in these cases, you will most likely hear 謙譲語 spoken to you as ...


4

I can think of three cases: Speaking casually to a friend about a 先生 or other respected figure, as virmaior pointed out In older materials, or materials set in older settings like 時代劇 In written materials like newspapers The common thread here is a difference between the two types of polite language. 敬語 is about reinforcing the social order: respecting ...


5

This happens all the time in 時代劇{じだいげき}: 「黒田と申{もう}す」 - I am called Kuroda 「仰{おお}せの通{とお}りに致{いた}す」 - (I) shall do just as (you) have spoken


6

丁寧語 is about who you are talking to. Its use is to be polite to your listener/reader. 尊敬語/謙譲語 are about who you are talking about. These patterns show respect to the agent. 謙譲語 to lower yourself (or someone on the same side as you vis-a-vis your listener) and 尊敬語 to raise the person you're talking about. Thus, you can say 先生からみかんをいただいた。 or ...


5

である is formal, but not polite であります is formal and polite, but not humble でございます is formal and polite and humble だ is informal, but not polite です is informal-* and polite *- compared to である A politician giving a speech on TV: 我々は日本国民である - We are Japanese citizens A lawyer speaking to a judge: (I think this usage is rare though...) ...



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