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5

All of them are syntactically correct, but they are semantically strange as explained below. Depending on the situation, もらう may not be polite enough. いただく will be even more polite. In the second one, 泊める is just about the night, so it is unnatural to mention 8日から9日まで, which means the whole two days (unless you are talking about both nights of 8日 and 9日, ...


3

Your observation is correct. I'm not sure about the etymology, but as a matter of fact, we can use 「お疲れさん」 to someone whose status is equal to or lower than ourselves. Addressing it to your boss is clearly rude. Personally, I usually stick to 「お疲れさまです」 in a business setting, because I think saying お疲れさん is over-friendly and shows little or no respect. Even ...


3

Basically, from low to high (and high to low) お疲れさまです from high to low ご苦労様です お疲れさん ご苦労さん In many cases, the act of 省略 generally decreases the level of honour.


3

The nature of sound shortening is often, due to the environment that spawns such changes, rather 'casual' and colloquial. Much like how 様 and さん have relatively different levels of 'politeness' so do お疲れさま and お疲れさん. (Speaking merely from personal experience, I have only used お疲れさん among friends and casual acquaintances in informal situations. Among equal ...


2

It depends on how it is used. If the customer had made all the orders, and the waiter is making a confirmation going through the orders, and if the non-past tense is used, then it will sound like the waiter simply forgot the order and is asking for the second time with a guess. That can be rude. By using the past tense, it expresses that the customer's ...


8

In short, your waiter said what he said because it is the "in" thing to do for young workers (mostly part-time) at inexpensive restaurants, fast food places, convenience stores, etc. This speech style is called 「マニュアル[敬語]{けいご}」, 「コンビニ[言葉]{ことば}」、「ファミレス言葉」, etc. and it has been very common the last 20 years or so. (マニュアル = "manual", ファミレス = "family ...


-1

No one said two really common expressions: どうってことない and いいってこと, followed usually by よ ... Also any similar expression ( どうってことはない, どうと言うこともない, どうって言うことはない and so on...). To prove the use of ii tte koto, which I guess may be regional, here is a link However, I'm not questioning how often you hear it in real life, I'm saying you hear it pretty often. And ...


5

Answer I'm a native speaker and I'm sure that there's no difference between them. It's a evidence for it that Japanese government uses 外人 on its public document. Reference It's said that 外人(さん) should not be used because few people feel discriminated when Japanese call them 外人. Thus, especially on public document (e.g. TV programs), 外国人 are used ...


2

First of all, there's only one modern polite word to call a foreigner and it is 外国人. There are other phrases too, such as 海外の人 or 海外の方. The latter one is used more often. However, you mostly hear 外国人 when a politician talks from a tribune or an overly politically correct Japanese person tries to be polite. In fact the normal way to refer to a foreigner is ...



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