New answers tagged

2

The formal and official term for a (medical) doctor is always 医師【いし】, and it's the word that should be used in news media and such. If you ask native Japanese speakers "Is 医者 is less respectful than 医師?", I would expect mixed reactions. Many people would say say it's a pure colloquial variant of 医師. You can safely say "自分の息子を医者にさせたい", "この町にはもっと医者がいて欲しい" and ...


0

Language is about communication, first and foremost, but whereas in many languages (such as English) the focus is on getting the information in itself across as smoothly as possible, other languages (such as Japanese, German or the romance languages) require the encoding of social relationships along with the information. Why this should be so isn't ...


0

どこからきた? does sound rude, but things are complicated because not so rarely people would talk to you in non-polite forms. Among Japanese society, there are opportunities when you can escape from duty of using Standard Japanese. When you are a child, when you belong to internal societies which dialectal speech is applied to and when you speak to them, in other ...


1

Maki's answer covers most of your questions, so I'm only going to go into common names for some of the different speech modes. However, as other comments/answers have pointed out, these speech mode names don't come up in day-to-day conversation in the way you're asking about (at least in my experience). They're more useful in linguistic contexts (eg "how ...


2

First of all, linguistically you are not wrong even if you used a less polite form. However, you are impolite in-terms of culture understandings. (@user11589 has already gave you a very good link for reference, so I'm just going to go simple.) A simple way to decide which form to use is by the situation and person you are talking to (similar to dress-code, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included