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14

I share your experience. Sticking straight to the katakana pronunciation below, I have never had the problem of someone not understanding me any more. I believe this is the pronunciation currently taught in Japanese schools. A: エー【HL】 B: ビー【HL】 C: シー【HL】 D: ディー【HHL】 E: イー【HL】 F: エフ【HL】 G: ジー【HL】 H: エイチ【HLL】 I: アイ【HL】 J: ジェー【HHL】 K: ケー【HL】 L: エル【HL】 M: エム【HL】...


6

I hear both ぼく{HL} and ぼく{LH} for a first personal pronoun even only in Tokyo, so you can use either one you like. I actually use ぼく{HL} more frequently than ぼく{LH}, but I DO pronounce ぼく{LH} occasionally. As I feel both of them are pronounced regardless of age, I cannot declare which a voice actor voices. ぼく{HL} seems to be used more often than ぼく{...


5

I agree with Earthliŋ for the most part. Though I have never heard of Japanese students being taught and official "Katakana-ized" version of the English alphabet. Generally they seem to be taught to imitate native pronunciation as closely as possible. I use and hear the following variations regularly: Disclaimer: I live in Kansai. A - エイ D - ディー or デー (...


4

Really the pitch accent for each word depends on dialects, but in general it's not actually so hard to understand when somebody talks with different pitch accents, so maybe that's why many textbooks and dictionaries don't write much about the accent for each words. I was born in Tokyo but had army service in Hokkaido, there people refered to me as "kaWAsaki"...


3

It shows that 二つ rises on た, but may or may not drop つ. It's the same with 三つ. In standard Japanese, 2つ and 3つ are pronounced as [ふたつ]{LHH} and [みっつ]{LHH}, rising on た and not dropping on つ. The pitch after the つ depends on what follows it: [ふたつの]{LHHL}~~ [みっつに]{LHHL}なった [ふたつしか]{LHHLL}ない [みっつも]{LHHL}ある [みっつあります]{LHHHHHL} [ふたつください]{...


2

For words which are called 'accentless' (ex: 端) which end on a high pitch, that pitch is continued to the following word (including particles). That pitch can be continued across several words depending on whether the words in the middle have accents or not. Examples: 行った・こと・ある L H ・H H ・H L そんな・気・が・する L H ・H・H・ H L Here, "行った" and "気” are both ...


2

Yes, the accent still moves forward one position in the gerundive and past conjugations of auxiliary verbs such as the causative and the past. I will give an example as follows. 書く{HL} ; 書かれる{LHHL} ; 書かせる{LHHL} ; 書かせられる{LHHHHL} 書かない{LHLL} ; 書かれない{LHHLL} ; 書かせない{LHHLL} ; 書かせられない{LHHHHLL} 書いて{HLL} ; 書かれて{LHLL} ; 書かせて{LHLL} ; 書かせられて{LHHHLL} ...


2

I have a copy of the 新明解日本語アクセント辞典 dictionary (my detailed review of it) somewhere and I remember seeing multiple entries for some of the words. While I have looked up a few words in it and also utilized Japanese electronic dictionaries that have audio samples for certain words, overall I've found that I learn more about pitches from paying careful ...


1

Spelling conventions are different. It's almost certainly not the case that the pronunciation has changed since then, as evidence suggests that /si/ has been [ɕi] since Old Japanese in the 700s (and also suggests that /se/ was once [ɕe], meaning that the overall direction might well be from [ɕ] to [s] rather than the other way around). Some romanisation ...


1

A first, I write the initial word in compound nouns ''N1'', and the second word ''N2''.   The original pitch-accent pattern of N2 governs the location of pitch-accent in compound words. If N2 is 3 morae long or longer (1) In case N2 has the accent-fall in the middle, or on the initial syllable of the word, the compound noun keeps the location of N2. [...



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