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6

This one can be beautifully summarized by a simple quote from wiktionary: 語源[編集] どう、いたし・まし・て<「どう(どのように、何を)」+「いたす(「する」の謙譲語)」+「ます(丁寧語を造る助動詞)」+「て(反問的用法の終助詞)」)。 「何を、したというわけでもありませんよ(だから、気になさらないでください)」の意 It's fairly self explanatory, but to give a breakdown in english: どう = どのように いたす = する in humble language ます is the polite verb ending, but in te ...


5

I think the colloquial way (and most common way) is: 頭が痛い。 Or even more colloquially dropping が: 頭痛いよ。 Please note that 痛い is an i-adjective so 「頭が痛いだ。」 is not correct. This can be used for other body parts too. I think that the confusion is because in English there are words for some of the "aches" which you often use, like "headache" or ...


5

In your example, 日本人の知らない is a relative clause, equivalent in meaning to 日本人が知らない. This clause as a whole modifies 日本語, so it means the Japanese that Japanese people don't know. In relative clauses, the subject particle が can be replaced with の: ジョンが買った本 ジョンの買った本 The book John bought This is true in double-subject constructions as ...


4

There are a couple of reasons for this. One part is that [万]{まん} is the the point in the scale where things start looping (much like how in English we group by sets of three 0s, Japanese does it by groups of 4). As such, it in many ways behaves like a counter. Therefore, much like you wouldn't just say [匹]{ひき} to refer to a single dog, you don't say ...


4

The しており in this particular sentence is certainly not 謙譲語 because the speaker is not talking about himslef. Rather, he is talking about ロシア軍. One uses 謙譲語 to indirectly show respect to the listener by speaking humbly about himself. In news reporting, as you stated, there is no need or expectation of the use of any kind of 敬語. In this case, しており is simply ...


4

(I was just about to do a little research before answering this when I was delighted to see a citation to another answer from me to a different question: Where does the phrase 「ノリが悪い」 come from and what is the meaning?) Rather than repeat this answer, I think it is enough to say that you have the equivalent expression in English and, as often happens, we ...


4

You have a couple choices: 頭が痛い   (not ×頭が痛いだ) 頭痛がする I basically agree with Szymon's answer that 頭が痛い is more colloquial and all-around more common. You can use either phrase, though. (You can make it more colloquial yet by omitting the particle が.) Adding だ to adjectives like 痛い is nonstandard. To make these more polite, use 頭が痛いです or 頭痛がします.


3

This may serve as an interesting read. It seems to be a list of the license plate numbers that people wanted, sorted in order of frequency. Unfortunately, frequency lists are very difficult to find because they require large amounts of information to be accurate and few people have the resources to gather and subsequently analyze that information.


3

Some of these have their own set phrases or multiple ways of saying it. For example, if you feel like throwing up, you can say 吐き気がする or 吐きそう. Another pattern you might see is something like 尿意を 催{もよお}す, which is basically to have the urge to pee, or to feel like peeing. If you want to say "I feel old" then you can use 気がする again, like もうおじさんになった気がする ...


3

It is often the case that some part, which a speaker thinks of while speaking is added to the end of a sentence, or even added as a new sentence. In this case 今よりもっと痩せたいです → 痩せたいです今よりもっと Of course, the first sentence just means I want to lose even more weight than now. and the second sentence is just a rearranged version of the first.


2

This さん is the same one as adding it after someone's name. But a more polite version is ご苦労様【く・ろう・さま】. Here it is being used in a familiar setting, so they use さん instead. There are several topics on this site regarding ご苦労様, so I suggest looking at those as well. As far as meaning, さん is a contraction of さま, but I don't believe さん・さま being applied to ...


1

I think the only way for it to be あれが and make sense is if it's in response to some question. Although that would be emphasizing the that in "That must be it". 何が一番偉いものなんだ? → What's the best/greatest one (thing)? あれが! → That one (is)! / That must be it! If you're sure the pronunciation isn't だ, there's a slight possibility they could be saying ...



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