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7

会社の名前{なまえ} consists of two nouns, one describing the other. The one with の is in genitive case which is used to indicate possession in this case. It's roughly equivalent to 's or of in English: company's name or the name of the company (both are translated to 会社の名前). Note that 名前 is a native Japanese word and it uses kun-yomi reading of the kanji in this ...


6

It sounds like 人間キャッチホン (or 人間キャッチフォン) to me. キャッチホン is the Japanese term for "call waiting". I haven't watched the full episode, but this would make sense in context if Satomi (the woman in the apron) is "putting Mikami on hold" while she gets closer to Nagao, or something to that effect. The meaning of this idiom is pretty transparent (once you know ...


6

There are a couple of reasons for this. One part is that [万]{まん} is the the point in the scale where things start looping (much like how in English we group by sets of three 0s, Japanese does it by groups of 4). As such, it in many ways behaves like a counter. Therefore, much like you wouldn't just say [匹]{ひき} to refer to a single dog, you don't say ...


5

I think the colloquial way (and most common way) is: 頭が痛い。 Or even more colloquially dropping が: 頭痛いよ。 Please note that 痛い is an i-adjective so 「頭が痛いだ。」 is not correct. This can be used for other body parts too. I think that the confusion is because in English there are words for some of the "aches" which you often use, like "headache" or ...


5

If you wanted to say it a little more properly: すみませんが、もう一度{いちど}お願{ねが}いします。 This is more explicit; "Sorry but can you please say that again?". I would use this if I couldn't understand one piece of the conversation. or すみません。声{こえ}が/お電話{でんわ}が遠{とお}いようなのですが。 This is a soft or roundabout way of asking the other person to repeat themselves. I usually use ...


4

You have a couple choices: 頭が痛い   (not ×頭が痛いだ) 頭痛がする I basically agree with Szymon's answer that 頭が痛い is more colloquial and all-around more common. You can use either phrase, though. (You can make it more colloquial yet by omitting the particle が.) Adding だ to adjectives like 痛い is nonstandard. To make these more polite, use 頭が痛いです or 頭痛がします.


4

The しており in this particular sentence is certainly not 謙譲語 because the speaker is not talking about himslef. Rather, he is talking about ロシア軍. One uses 謙譲語 to indirectly show respect to the listener by speaking humbly about himself. In news reporting, as you stated, there is no need or expectation of the use of any kind of 敬語. In this case, しており is simply ...


4

Little words like by and に have lots of uses. He was murdered by his own doctor! She was sitting by the tree enjoying the sun. I won the contest by cheating. She bills by the hour. In the first sentence, by is used for the agent of a passive clause. In the second sentence, by is used to express a location. In the third sentence, by is ...


4

In casual conversation I think you can say: A: (前は)どこ(orどこの会社)にいたの?/いたんですか。 B: ((ずっと)前(は))IBMにいた/いました。あと、BestBuyにもいた/いました/いたことがあります。etc. ... using the verb いる(居る), or A: (前は)どこに(orどこの会社に/どこに仕事(に)/仕事(は)どこ(に))行ってたの?/行ってたんですか。 B: ((ずっと)前(は))IBMに行ってた/行ってました。あと、BestBuyにも行ってた/行ってました/行ってたことがあります。etc. ... using the verb 行く. Of course you can say: ...


4

〜で働いた is fine for literally "worked at". But I more often hear 〜に[勤]{つと}める meaning "employed for/by 〜"; usually in the 〜ている form ("am currently employed for/by 〜"). In this case, I think you'd just use the simple past tense. IBMに勤めたことがある。そして、BestBuyにも。 Also, see this post about a unique employment situation: Employed by one institution but work for ...


3

ばえる means 騒ぐ in 鳥取弁, the dialect of Tottori. けん is mostly used in the 九州 area and some parts of 四国 and can mean a range of things. I am most familiar with から and some kinds of よ: から 今日は寒いけん、コートを着た方がいいよ 今日は寒いから、コートを着た方がいいよ よ お茶いれたけん お茶いれたよ Or いや、昨日めちゃめちゃ面白かったんだよな〜 いや、昨日めちゃおもろかったけんな〜


3

"Chi" is a pretty common morpheme but seldom used as a word, except in certain fossilized phrases. "Ichi" is unambiguously an independent word. So they are different in that respect. I would call it a qualitative difference; others may disagree. Whether that difference is sufficient to allow one as a Wiktionary entry but reject the other depends on ...


3

The particle "に" can fulfill many distinct grammatical functions. In this case, "に" does not mark a qualifier of time or place, but instead marks the agent/source of a passive verb. As such, it would usually be translated in English with the preposition "by": 私が刺された。 I was bitten/stung. 私が蚊に刺された。 I was bitten by a mosquito. See this page for an ...


3

This may serve as an interesting read. It seems to be a list of the license plate numbers that people wanted, sorted in order of frequency. Unfortunately, frequency lists are very difficult to find because they require large amounts of information to be accurate and few people have the resources to gather and subsequently analyze that information.


2

整える should be most suitable. However, just saying 'please put my hair in order' might be a little ambiguous. I'm sure your barber would ask for more details and you would get your desired haircut. But to be sure you might want to mention that you want to keep the length the same. Therefore you could say: 長{なが}さをそのままで、全体的{ぜんたいてき}に整えてください。 Which pretty much ...


2

One of the uses of the の particle (that you will learn early on in Japanese) is to show possession. "Company Name" is the same as "Company's Name". Company's Name = 会社の名前


2

I think it is 春だもの。 春だもん。 (≒春だから。) said in an archaic way or in 役割語-老人語 (or maybe in a regional dialect).


2

会社{かいしゃ}の名前{なまえ} is grammatically fine, and while compound nouns are sometimes formed by simply eliminating the の particle (e.g.,本{ほん}の棚{たな} -> 本棚{ほんだな} or 勉強{べんきょう}の不足{ふそく} -> 勉強不足{べんきょうぶそく}), in this case the word you are looking for is: 会社名{かいしゃめい} (the on-yomi of 名 is generally used in compound nouns and has the same meaning as 名前{なまえ} as a whole: name). ...


2

蚊に刺された does mean "I was bitten by a mosquito." Passives in general work like this: Active sentence: actor-GA patient-WO verb.stem-verb.inflection ⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓ Passive sentence: patient-GA actor-NI verb.stem-are-verb.inflection So in your case: Active sentence: ka-GA ...


2

Shogakukan's Kokugo Dai Jiten Dictionary states: カルタ賭博から出た語 A term from card gambling The entry also gives 一{いち}か六{ろく}か as a synonym. This version may be more obviously related to dice gambling, but as mentioned in the discussion at http://gogen-allguide.com/i/ichikabachika.html, the 一 and 八 (or 六) here may not directly indicate the numbers, and ...


2

We native Japanese speakers sometimes say どんぐりの実 to mean どんぐり/acorn, probably carelessly and incorrectly, especially in an informal context. (Maybe because we use the broad term どんぐりの木 for ブナ(beech?), ナラ(Japanese oak?), [樫]{かし}(evergreen oak?), クヌギ(sawtooth oak?), etc., and think mistakenly that there should be どんぐりの実 vs どんぐりの木, just like there're ブナの木 vs ...


1

The 実 here emphasizes that the writer isn't just talking about acorns, but more specifically about the meat inside the acorn. If you think about it more, it makes more sense -- the text is describing the origins of the character 白 as a symbolic rendering of the meat of the acorn nut, in reference to the off-white color. The text here can't be talking about ...


1

If you check the example sentences with orders, you may get a better grasp of this expression: いい加減にしろ That's enough!; cut it out!; get a life!. いい加減にしなさい Shape up!; act properly! Basically, in colloquial speech いい加減(に) is usually used in one of two ways: 1) Stop acting irresponsibly/carelessly/slacking off. Usually it's followed by しろ / ...



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