Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

Unfortunately, it is unlikely that these Japanese letters have anything to do with summer. These are mascots of Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd., a company run by Takashi Murakami, the artist who painted this Google Doodle. Also note that the same mascots appear in the Winter Solstice Doodle, too.


13

In your example, 日本人の知らない is a relative clause, equivalent in meaning to 日本人が知らない. This clause as a whole modifies 日本語, so it means the Japanese that Japanese people don't know. In relative clauses, the subject particle が can be replaced with の: ジョンが買った本 ジョンの買った本 The book John bought This is true in double-subject constructions as ...


12

In a restaurant it is usually enough to simply ask for お箸を下さい. It is perfectly understood that that means "enough chopsticks for me [and my companions], please". Anything more specific is usually unnatural. If you do need to specify how many pairs of chopsticks exactly, you'd usually use 〜膳 -zen.


9

You are using what could be interpreted as two different verbs: まける -> to lose しっぱいする -> to fail Formally, I usually hear "I cannot afford to fail" rather than "I don't want to fail". 失敗する余裕はありません。 If you want to sound cool, you could say "I don't have any intention on losing". 負けるつもりはありません。


8

A typical phrase in japanese for this situation is "勉強になりました", though it is obviously not a direct translation. Maybe you could say: 前よりもっと分かりました Or from Chocolateさん: 前よりずっと理解が深まりました


8

阿月地区を東西二つに分けて means "separate the Azuki district into two parts, east and west". You could insert a の, making it 東西の二つ, but the adverbial use without it is not uncommon for these "listing"-jukugo like 東西, 優劣, 大小 etc.


8

It's just standard GA-NO conversion. [日本人が知らない]日本語 'Japanese that [Japanese don't know]'


7

If you get a number of items from a convenience store in Japan the clerk will ask you how many chopsticks you want, and even these staff (not always the most educated of Japanese) will properly ask "ohashi nanzen" お箸何膳, i.e. how many (pairs of) chopsticks do you want? This is proper and natural and not bookish. I have never heard anyone use "hon" 本 as a ...


7

Caveat emptor: My sphere of knowledge is biased towards internet slangs. The phenomenon of snowcloning is common in Japanese, while the term itself is not widely known. 能登かわいいよ能登 -> XかわいいよX (The original phrase made it into a slang dictionary published in 2007) 見ろ! 人がゴミのようだ! -> 見ろ! XがYのようだ! (With Y being ゴミ in most cases) パンが無いならお菓子を食べればいいじゃない -> ...


7

会社の名前{なまえ} consists of two nouns, one describing the other. The one with の is in genitive case which is used to indicate possession in this case. It's roughly equivalent to 's or of in English: company's name or the name of the company (both are translated to 会社の名前). Note that 名前 is a native Japanese word and it uses kun-yomi reading of the kanji in this ...


6

It is said the same way as in English: "私たち---" / "We ---" For example, "私たち日本人" is a common way to say "We Japanese". Your inclusion of の was incorrect. Here are a number of examples: http://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=私たち日本人 The same goes for "We Americans," (私たちアメリカ人) and as an added bonus, here is an example with 我 We Americans make no secret of our ...


6

頼り is the noun form of verb 頼る (tayor-u), and here 頼り means a thing/person to count on. Examples: 君だけが頼りだ。 I can only count on you. 地図を頼りに家を探す look for the house with the help of a map (This example is from Daijisen; the English translation is by me.) In general, AをBにする means “turn A into B.” Setting B=頼り, Aを頼りにする means “turn A into ‘something ...


6

の[方]{ほう} is just a way of emphasizing "about". Apart from that, what about the public safety department? Literally, it means "direction". A similar way of saying Xの方 in English would be with "on the X side of things", i.e. Apart from that, what about the public safety department side of things? P.S. There was a similar question where the OP ...


6

There are a couple of reasons for this. One part is that [万]{まん} is the the point in the scale where things start looping (much like how in English we group by sets of three 0s, Japanese does it by groups of 4). As such, it in many ways behaves like a counter. Therefore, much like you wouldn't just say [匹]{ひき} to refer to a single dog, you don't say ...


6

The way that I would say it is: [負]{ま}けたくないんです。(maketakunain desu) I'd be especially inclined to say it this way to the teacher of the class in question, as it sounds explanatory and somewhat humble. This roughly translates to "I'd like not to fail" or "I'd rather not fail." The "desu" is a copula verb that makes the sentence a polite one.


6

As mentioned から/まで is OK. That's a really basic Japanese 101-style construction that you should be familiar with at a beginner level. As an alternative start/end point type of constuction, you can use ~から~にかけて, as in the following example from alc: 12月から2月にかけて、札幌の平均気温は氷点下です。 From December through February, the average Sapporo temperature is below ...


6

This one can be beautifully summarized by a simple quote from wiktionary: 語源[編集] どう、いたし・まし・て<「どう(どのように、何を)」+「いたす(「する」の謙譲語)」+「ます(丁寧語を造る助動詞)」+「て(反問的用法の終助詞)」)。 「何を、したというわけでもありませんよ(だから、気になさらないでください)」の意 It's fairly self explanatory, but to give a breakdown in english: どう = どのように いたす = する in humble language ます is the polite verb ending, but in te ...


6

It sounds like 人間キャッチホン (or 人間キャッチフォン) to me. キャッチホン is the Japanese term for "call waiting". I haven't watched the full episode, but this would make sense in context if Satomi (the woman in the apron) is "putting Mikami on hold" while she gets closer to Nagao, or something to that effect. The meaning of this idiom is pretty transparent (once you know ...


5

東西二つに分けて just means east and west separated in two. 分ける:to separate/devide 東西: east and west The festival will take place in the sectors of Azuki separated in two, east and west.


5

I'm Japanese. I hope to improve my English and use English more often, so I'll answer your question. As Darius-san wrote, 2 is ambiguous, and most Japanese think that she arrived in her country and then bought the bag. But if I translate these sentences without thinking well, I might do both to "I bought a bag when I went back to my country." Given this, I ...


5

To start with, 頼りにしている does translate as "(I'm) counting on you" or "(I'm) relying on you". Basically in this case it's saying that the speaker is in this situation of relying on someone for something. "I am relying on you to bring back my library book, because otherwise I'll get a fine". It's describing the speakers state. The second point I'd like to ...


5

I think the colloquial way (and most common way) is: 頭が痛い。 Or even more colloquially dropping が: 頭痛いよ。 Please note that 痛い is an i-adjective so 「頭が痛いだ。」 is not correct. This can be used for other body parts too. I think that the confusion is because in English there are words for some of the "aches" which you often use, like "headache" or ...


5

If you wanted to say it a little more properly: すみませんが、もう一度{いちど}お願{ねが}いします。 This is more explicit; "Sorry but can you please say that again?". I would use this if I couldn't understand one piece of the conversation. or すみません。声{こえ}が/お電話{でんわ}が遠{とお}いようなのですが。 This is a soft or roundabout way of asking the other person to repeat themselves. I usually use ...


5

It is a metaphor (unless the song is actually about buttons) used to describe an interpersonal relationship. 「ボタンを[掛]{か}け[違]{ちが}う」 is a fairly common metaphor meaning "to have small misunderstandings", "to be at cross purposes", "to fail to move closely together", "to continuously have little disagreements", etc. 「掛け違ったボタンは[直]{す}ぐほつれた」 might be difficult ...


5

YES, It's marketing phrase. コーポレートスローガン(corporate slogan) 参考URL http://matome.naver.jp/odai/2126276350931073501 未来につなぐ環境戦略 > not natural (not colloquial) 未来につなぐための環境戦略 > natural e.g. Talk: 「[本日]{ほんじつ}は未来につなぐための環境戦略について[討議]{とうぎ}しましょう」 TV Commercial: 「未来につなぐ環境戦略」(with something BGM)



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible