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14

Unfortunately, it is unlikely that these Japanese letters have anything to do with summer. These are mascots of Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd., a company run by Takashi Murakami, the artist who painted this Google Doodle. Also note that the same mascots appear in the Winter Solstice Doodle, too.


13

In a restaurant it is usually enough to simply ask for お箸を下さい. It is perfectly understood that that means "enough chopsticks for me [and my companions], please". Anything more specific is usually unnatural. If you do need to specify how many pairs of chopsticks exactly, you'd usually use 〜膳 -zen.


12

Thin it out. すいてください。 Thin out this part. このあたりを、すいてください。 I want this part this long. ここを、このくらいの[長]{なが}さにしてください。 Keep the front. [前]{まえ}[髪]{がみ}を[残]{のこ}してください。 Take about 1 centimeter off my bangs. [前]{まえ}[髪]{がみ}を1センチくらい[切]{き}ってください。 Shorten it in back by about 5 centimeters. [後]{うし}ろを5センチくらい[切]{き}ってください。 Trim a little more. もう[少]{すこ}し[切]{き}ってください。 Trim this ...


8

You are using what could be interpreted as two different verbs: まける -> to lose しっぱいする -> to fail Formally, I usually hear "I cannot afford to fail" rather than "I don't want to fail". 失敗する余裕はありません。 If you want to sound cool, you could say "I don't have any intention on losing". 負けるつもりはありません。


7

If you get a number of items from a convenience store in Japan the clerk will ask you how many chopsticks you want, and even these staff (not always the most educated of Japanese) will properly ask "ohashi nanzen" お箸何膳, i.e. how many (pairs of) chopsticks do you want? This is proper and natural and not bookish. I have never heard anyone use "hon" 本 as a ...


7

Simply translate them carefully. 多分、いいペットでしょうね. 'Probably, they are good pets'. 多分、いいペットになるでしょうね. 'Probably, they will become good pets'. Don't you think the second one is closer to the meaning you wanted? If you want to emphasize it is an assumption, you can say いいペットになりそうですね.


6

頼り is the noun form of verb 頼る (tayor-u), and here 頼り means a thing/person to count on. Examples: 君だけが頼りだ。 I can only count on you. 地図を頼りに家を探す look for the house with the help of a map (This example is from Daijisen; the English translation is by me.) In general, AをBにする means “turn A into B.” Setting B=頼り, Aを頼りにする means “turn A into ‘something ...


6

It is said the same way as in English: "私たち---" / "We ---" For example, "私たち日本人" is a common way to say "We Japanese". Your inclusion of の was incorrect. Here are a number of examples: http://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=私たち日本人 The same goes for "We Americans," (私たちアメリカ人) and as an added bonus, here is an example with 我 We Americans make no secret of our ...


6

The way that I would say it is: [負]{ま}けたくないんです。(maketakunain desu) I'd be especially inclined to say it this way to the teacher of the class in question, as it sounds explanatory and somewhat humble. This roughly translates to "I'd like not to fail" or "I'd rather not fail." The "desu" is a copula verb that makes the sentence a polite one.


6

As mentioned から/まで is OK. That's a really basic Japanese 101-style construction that you should be familiar with at a beginner level. As an alternative start/end point type of constuction, you can use ~から~にかけて, as in the following example from alc: 12月から2月にかけて、札幌の平均気温は氷点下です。 From December through February, the average Sapporo temperature is below ...


6

Caveat emptor: My sphere of knowledge is biased towards internet slangs. The phenomenon of snowcloning is common in Japanese, while the term itself is not widely known. 能登かわいいよ能登 -> XかわいいよX (The original phrase made it into a slang dictionary published in 2007) 見ろ! 人がゴミのようだ! -> 見ろ! XがYのようだ! (With Y being ゴミ in most cases) パンが無いならお菓子を食べればいいじゃない -> ...


6

の[方]{ほう} is just a way of emphasizing "about". Apart from that, what about the public safety department? Literally, it means "direction". A similar way of saying Xの方 in English would be with "on the X side of things", i.e. Apart from that, what about the public safety department side of things? P.S. There was a similar question where the OP ...


6

This one can be beautifully summarized by a simple quote from wiktionary: 語源[編集] どう、いたし・まし・て<「どう(どのように、何を)」+「いたす(「する」の謙譲語)」+「ます(丁寧語を造る助動詞)」+「て(反問的用法の終助詞)」)。 「何を、したというわけでもありませんよ(だから、気になさらないでください)」の意 It's fairly self explanatory, but to give a breakdown in english: どう = どのように いたす = する in humble language ます is the polite verb ending, but in te ...


5

I'm Japanese. I hope to improve my English and use English more often, so I'll answer your question. As Darius-san wrote, 2 is ambiguous, and most Japanese think that she arrived in her country and then bought the bag. But if I translate these sentences without thinking well, I might do both to "I bought a bag when I went back to my country." Given this, I ...


5

To start with, 頼りにしている does translate as "(I'm) counting on you" or "(I'm) relying on you". Basically in this case it's saying that the speaker is in this situation of relying on someone for something. "I am relying on you to bring back my library book, because otherwise I'll get a fine". It's describing the speakers state. The second point I'd like to ...


5

In your example, 日本人の知らない is a relative clause, equivalent in meaning to 日本人が知らない. This clause as a whole modifies 日本語, so it means the Japanese that Japanese people don't know. In relative clauses, the subject particle が can be replaced with の: ジョンが買った本 ジョンの買った本 The book John bought This is true in double-subject constructions as ...


5

I think the colloquial way (and most common way) is: 頭が痛い。 Or even more colloquially dropping が: 頭痛いよ。 Please note that 痛い is an i-adjective so 「頭が痛いだ。」 is not correct. This can be used for other body parts too. I think that the confusion is because in English there are words for some of the "aches" which you often use, like "headache" or ...


4

と is used to introduce a subordinate clause, and is close to the English that. When to omit them with quotations seems to differ between the two languages. I cannot give you an explanation, but let me just illustrate. Complement of quotation verbs  He said that he likes apples.  He said he likes apples. × He said that "I like apples".  He said "I ...


4

わがままはもう言わない does not mean "won't say anything selfish anymore." This is a form often used by parents (mostly mothers) to young children as a gentler form of prohibition than ~な. わがままを言う, while literally meaning "to say [selfish things]*," is in usage much closer to "to be selfish." * This is not exactly on topic, so while I have addressed it, my response is ...


4

Yes, absolutely! One year in Japan and during that time I heard them using these kinds of sentence all the time. So, yes, it is a common issue. I will provide a broader view for your question. You are actually asking about the following pattern: (Noun)のほう(...) Whose meaning is the one of pointing out something whenever two options are considered. ...


4

There are two things to define in 腕が光る: 腕, which can mean skill or ability (大辞林 sense 3) 光る, which can mean to stand out as superior [in ability, etc.] (大辞林 sense 3) The latter is, I think, figurative in the same sense as English shine ("To distinguish oneself in an activity or a field; excel"). Put the two words together with が, and you have a phrase ...


4

(I was just about to do a little research before answering this when I was delighted to see a citation to another answer from me to a different question: Where does the phrase 「ノリが悪い」 come from and what is the meaning?) Rather than repeat this answer, I think it is enough to say that you have the equivalent expression in English and, as often happens, we ...


4

The しており in this particular sentence is certainly not 謙譲語 because the speaker is not talking about himslef. Rather, he is talking about ロシア軍. One uses 謙譲語 to indirectly show respect to the listener by speaking humbly about himself. In news reporting, as you stated, there is no need or expectation of the use of any kind of 敬語. In this case, しており is simply ...


4

There are a couple of reasons for this. One part is that [万]{まん} is the the point in the scale where things start looping (much like how in English we group by sets of three 0s, Japanese does it by groups of 4). As such, it in many ways behaves like a counter. Therefore, much like you wouldn't just say [匹]{ひき} to refer to a single dog, you don't say ...


4

You have a couple choices: 頭が痛い   (not ×頭が痛いだ) 頭痛がする I basically agree with Szymon's answer that 頭が痛い is more colloquial and all-around more common. You can use either phrase, though. (You can make it more colloquial yet by omitting the particle が.) Adding だ to adjectives like 痛い is nonstandard. To make these more polite, use 頭が痛いです or 頭痛がします.


3

all engineering courses are four years long I'm not sure what you call an "engineering course", so that's a problem for translaton. However, probably some of those would be good (alhough I find the last one not very natural myself). 工学の授業は全て四年間かかります。 工学部の課程は四年間の課程です。 工学の授業は四年間に至ります。


3

Some of these have their own set phrases or multiple ways of saying it. For example, if you feel like throwing up, you can say 吐き気がする or 吐きそう. Another pattern you might see is something like 尿意を 催{もよお}す, which is basically to have the urge to pee, or to feel like peeing. If you want to say "I feel old" then you can use 気がする again, like もうおじさんになった気がする ...


3

It is often the case that some part, which a speaker thinks of while speaking is added to the end of a sentence, or even added as a new sentence. In this case 今よりもっと痩せたいです → 痩せたいです今よりもっと Of course, the first sentence just means I want to lose even more weight than now. and the second sentence is just a rearranged version of the first.



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