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11

If you just want to say "overrated," 「過大評価」 is the word for it. この役者は過大評価されている。 The antonym is 「過小評価」. 「高評価すぎる」 sounds a bit strange but would be fine it it were 「高く評価されすぎる」. I think 高評価 is used often in context that imply positive impressions, which doesn't match the negative nuance of "overrated." In general, 〜すぎる works for most of the time. You can ...


10

That would be 「猫{ねこ}に注意{ちゅうい}」-- 「ねこにちゅうい」 in all kana.


9

I would say that the most versatile counterpart would be 「相性{あいしょう}」. It can be used in any kind of interpersonal relationships including romantic ones. We say: 「(Person A) + と + (Peson B) + は + 相性がいい。」 or 「(Person A) + と + (Peson B) + は + 相性が悪{わる}い。」 Every once in a while, you will encounter the word 「ケミストリー」, but it is not very common at all.


9

I think you're referring to いかがですか ikaga desu ka which is the polite version of どうですか dou desu ka How are things? It can be used to ask "How are you?" in a polite way, but only with caution: いかがですか【ikaga desu ka】 is mostly used to mean "Would you like some?", so if you're holding something in your hand, one might assume you're offering to ...


8

引用文の終わりに、括弧に入れて (訳は筆者による) ←recommended または、(筆者訳) ← recommended (拙訳) (私訳) のように書くとよいと思います。


7

I can't think of or find a singular adjective/idiom that precisely captures this quality, so I'll suggest some ways how this is usually expressed. This quality is often described as “having the ability to admit one's [something negative]”. Common options for that negative something are: 非, 間違い, 欠点, 落ち度, 短所. You might say for example: ...


7

If I understand you correctly, the phrase you're looking for is more about entertaining extreme/absurd possibilities, or humorously saying how little you know about the matter, rather than a sincere “to the extent of my knowledge”. Variations on “知る限り” will work when you are being sincere, but it doesn't really work in a sarcastic way. I'd say it's closer ...


6

やっぱり 予想【よそう】通【どお】り 案【あん】の定【じょう】 ほらね! お約束【やくそく】 And many others. I don't know how to use 本当に sarcastically.


6

This humor appeared in the TV drama "Legal High" (リーガル・ハイ), first season, in the first episode. The guy in question is named Sugiura (杉浦). It doesn't really mean that the guy is lowly, it just means that he's a person who doesn't make his presence felt at all, so even the automatic door doesn't recognize him. The exact explanation in Japanese would be ...


6

I think what you have is fine, but I would say it as 私の知っている限り.


5

[労働時間]{ろうどうじかん} seems to work. The Wikipedia page for 労働時間 talks about 労働時間 in relation to labour laws (労働基準法), and has a section about calulating time worked (労働時間の計算・範囲). The following is the relevant paragraph: ...


4

「[割愛]{かつあい}」 is a formal word so appropriate to use in a formal situation as suggested by eltonjohnさん. 「[飛]{と}ばす」and 「[省略]{しょうりゃく}する」 have similar meanings, but 「割愛する」 is more appropriate in this case, because 「割愛」 is formal and has a special nuance for it. While 「飛ばす」 and 「省略する」 simply mean "omit", 「割愛する」 means "I do not want to omit [this/it/etc] but now ...


4

The technical term for that is 「[入線]{にゅうせん}」 for the noun and you can attach to it 「する/した/している, etc.」 to form a verb. 入線 in 大辞林 Will you actually hear us "regular" native-speaker passengers use the term? No, you rarely would if ever. It would mostly be either a railroad employee or a rail buff who might use it. The rest of the nation would use phrases ...


3

As a Japanese, I say that you can use 「到着」 豊岡行はもう到着していますか 新宮行は発車の何分前に到着の予定ですか BTW, in an announce, they say「電車が参ります」 not 「電車が入ります」 EDIT: in a timetable 「着」 means 「到着」, 「発」 means 「出発」 https://gyazo.com/8eb94dcfe8fdcda546e5fadec01c22fe


3

I would opt for the phrase もう一度ゆっくり言ってください。 もう一度 once more ゆっくり slowly 言ってください please say it If speed is not an issue in your not understanding the speaker, もう一度言ってください should be sufficient. If you're still finding that the speaker is rephrasing, adding 同じことを between もう一度 and 言って will really drive that point home.


3

I'm not sure there is an exact match, but these come close: ありのままの自分を見せる show my true, bare self 自分をさらけ出す lay myself bare 気持ちを包み隠さず話す confess my true feelings I hesitate to use the word 心, especially if you plan on saying this to someone in real life. But if you don't mind sounding like a maudlin love song, you can replace the 自分 or 気持ち in the above ...


3

To take a picture with someone: 一緒に写真を撮って(も)いいですか? To take a picture of someone, when the subject is your friend: 写真(を)撮って(も)いい? When you know the subject is ready to be taken a picture (for example when it's Mickey Mouse in Tokyo Disney Land): 写真を撮って(も)いいですか? Something like 写真お願いします usually means 'Can you take a photo for/of us?', but it's ...


3

some examples 素晴らしい◯◯でした。(** was wonderful.) 感動しました。(moved me) 最高でした。(was the best) if its an album, いつも聞いています。(I always listen to it) if its a book, depending on the content 私のバイブルです(Its my bible) not literally, but you know. if using slang is ok, now a days people put(神)before book/performance/album before and call it divine. Its a internet thing ...


3

I don't think it is a Japanese proverb, but it is very reminiscent of T.S.Eliot's poem 'The Naming of Cats,' perhaps that's where this idea originally comes from? 'When I tell you, a cat must have THREE DIFFERENT NAMES. First of all, there's the name that the family use daily, Such as Peter, Augustus, Alonzo or James... But I tell you, a cat needs a name ...


3

時間の関係で1節飛ばします might be a plain expression, but... What occasion have you got in mind? Your dissertation defense, say? In that case more polite expressions will be preferable. * added * You will read your paper at a conference? Then 時{じ}間{かん}の関{かん}係{けい}で、次{じ}節{せつ}は割{かつ}愛{あい}させて戴{いただ}き、第{だい}x節{せつ}に移{うつ}ります (where "x" is the section where you are to ...


3

I searched with Google, Qiita (one of the largest programmers' how-to sites in Japanese), and Japanese Stack Overflow, and to my surprise, I failed to find one single Japanese article introducing this 'XY problem'. So I can safely say XYプロブレム or XY問題 is not recognized by Japanese IT workers at all. (But is English "XY problem" widely used outside of Stack ...


3

In general you will want to the already suggested phrases but if you are talking about juice specifically, you will want to use 「果汁100%」as it doesn't make sense to talk about added sugars in juices. If that were the case, then you would just indicate the percentage of real fruit juice e.g. 果汁30%, which means that the rest of the drink consists of sugar ...


2

ノンシュガー and シュガーレス are also common.


2

You may find these translations from DMM英会話ブログ useful. This is on a site for Japanese learners of English, and includes: すみません、何と言いましたか? なんて言いましたか? ゆっくり/大きな声で話してもらえますか? もう一度言ってもらえますか?


1

It depends on who you're talking to. I would opt for the word 'sumimasen' here if you're talking to someone older or someone you don't know too well, as in: "Sumimasen, wakarimasen (deshita)." (You can use the 'deshita' if you want to say "I didn't understand you," although you can just leave it out if you want to say "I don't understand you.") Here's an ...


1

Even though Eric says it is not rude to use ください is japanese, based on your question, you are looking for a softer way to ask/request things. ・ください is like a formal and cold please but can be a bit straight sometimes. You can use it when you are the customer or the supervisor. Otherwise, to avoid this straightness, the sentence is often turned the other way ...


1

I think it is 砂糖が入っていない or 無糖.


1

I think the difference is how long you assumed that the person is a man. 「男じゃないんですか?」 implies that you've been assuming that the person is a man for some time. On the other hand, 「男じゃないですか?」 implies that you have just realized that the person is a man (though, it depends on the emphasis. You would put the emphasis on the word 「ない」 in this case).


1

I don't really like xの方がyより in this order. I would rather say it like ゲームXはゲームYより難しいのはもうわかっている。 or ゲームYよりゲームXの方が難しいのはもうわかっている。



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