Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

舒适区 is totally unfamiliar to Japanese. I don't even know what the first two kanjis are. Anyway, if you want to emphasize the negative aspect of "comfort zone" and want to say "the place you can't stay forever", a good word for both of your examples is 「ぬるま湯【ゆ】」 (literally "tepid water"). ぬるま湯につかる = stay safe, avoid challenge, lack vitality The trip is ...


11

ポケットティッシュ is the generic term for those tissue packs. As far as I know, there is no one word for "ポケットティッシュ for promotion". Manufacturers of those tissue packs seem to call them: [販促]{はんそく}用の(ポケット)ティッシュ (販促 = abbreviation for 販売促進 (sales promotion)) [宣伝]{せんでん}用の(ポケット)ティッシュ プロモーション用の(ポケット)ティッシュ Edit: Everyone knows those promotional tissue packs, so in ...


9

A very common (and mature-sounding) phrase would be 「[差]{さ}し[支]{つか}えなければ」. 「差し支え」 means "obstacle", "inconvenience", etc. 「差し支えなければ、ご[職業]{しょくぎょう}をお[聞]{き}きしてもよろしいですか。」 You may add a 「もし」 at the beginning as well. Other natural expressions would include: Polite:「(もし)お[尋]{たず}ねしてもよろしければ」 Less polite:「もし聞いてもよければ」


7

I think the closest approximation is 訳【わけ】が分からない (lit. reason is not understandable). 日本語の数え方は訳が分からない。 This is an informal expression, and depending on the context, this can be used to express your subjective, personal confusion (does not make sense to me): 日本語の数え方は私にとって訳が分からない。 ... and to express that something is objectively a mess: ...


6

This humor appeared in the TV drama "Legal High" (リーガル・ハイ), first season, in the first episode. The guy in question is named Sugiura (杉浦). It doesn't really mean that the guy is lowly, it just means that he's a person who doesn't make his presence felt at all, so even the automatic door doesn't recognize him. The exact explanation in Japanese would be ...


6

All of them are syntactically correct, but they are semantically strange as explained below. Depending on the situation, もらう may not be polite enough. いただく will be even more polite. In the second one, 泊める is just about the night, so it is unnatural to mention 8日から9日まで, which means the whole two days (unless you are talking about both nights of 8日 and 9日, ...


5

赤い車は青い車より速いですか? = Is the red car faster than the blue car? The topic of the sentence is the red car. You are more interested in the red car, or you are expecting the red car is faster. 赤い車と青い車と、どちらが速いですか? = Which is faster, the red car or the blue car? You are treating the two cars equally. There is no expectation about which one is faster in ...


4

「顔」 itself has a metaphorical meaning just as described in that paragraph. One can have more than one face in phrases/sentences like these: 表の顔と裏の顔 (lit. "front face and back face". The face you show to the world, and your inner side.) 彼は別の顔を持っている (lit. "He has another face". He has a secret hobby, or he is famous in two different fields, or he is a ...


4

It is probably 盗人【ぬすびと】にも三分【さんぶ】の理【り】, which is perhaps better translated as "even a thief has his reasons".


3

There's already a word for getting up, namely 起きる. I think that 横になる is mostly used to distinguish laying down from sleeping. Getting up is 起きる (and waking up is 目が覚める). In any case, 縦になる is not used.


3

In general you will want to the already suggested phrases but if you are talking about juice specifically, you will want to use 「果汁100%」as it doesn't make sense to talk about added sugars in juices. If that were the case, then you would just indicate the percentage of real fruit juice e.g. 果汁30%, which means that the rest of the drink consists of sugar ...


3

I would probably say [失礼]{しつ・れい}ですが、~ → I'm sorry to be rude, but ~


3

Writing as a customer will be much easier than writing in business. You don't have to be too nervous. Using basic 丁寧語 (e.g. 思っています instead of 思っている) will suffice, though extra correct 謙譲語 (like 存じております) may somewhat improve your impression. As for 尊敬語, I don't think you need it. But to add one point, utilizing the word 貴社 (or 御社) will be useful, like 貴社の製品 ...


3

I'll probably call it 駅前で配ってるティッシュ. As in 「駅前で配ってるやつでごめんね」 (they are usually bad quality).


2

I don't think it is a Japanese proverb, but it is very reminiscent of T.S.Eliot's poem 'The Naming of Cats,' perhaps that's where this idea originally comes from? 'When I tell you, a cat must have THREE DIFFERENT NAMES. First of all, there's the name that the family use daily, Such as Peter, Augustus, Alonzo or James... But I tell you, a cat needs a name ...


2

I think the best advice here is to suggest you consider what you really mean and if there is a different way of saying it with the Japanese you have learnt. At the moment, based on your question, it sounds like you want to say "the Japanese counting system is not logical" (which is what we mean by "making sense"). This is quite easy: ...


2

Usually Japanese start or end an email with own name in business whether he is stranger or colleague. for example like this for a potential customer はじめまして、○○社の△△と申します 今回は●●の件でメールをさせていただきました for a colleague △△です。お手数ですが今月分の支払いをお願いいたします C2B 11/8 23:32(Japan time) rewrote △△です。この度は●●社の○○という件についてお伺いしたいことがございます。 B2C ●●社の△△です。この度は弊社製品をご利用していただきましてありがとうございます。 ...


2

ノンシュガー and シュガーレス are also common.


1

Even though Eric says it is not rude to use ください is japanese, based on your question, you are looking for a softer way to ask/request things. ・ください is like a formal and cold please but can be a bit straight sometimes. You can use it when you are the customer or the supervisor. Otherwise, to avoid this straightness, the sentence is often turned the other way ...


1

I think it is 砂糖が入っていない or 無糖.


1

I think the difference is how long you assumed that the person is a man. 「男じゃないんですか?」 implies that you've been assuming that the person is a man for some time. On the other hand, 「男じゃないですか?」 implies that you have just realized that the person is a man (though, it depends on the emphasis. You would put the emphasis on the word 「ない」 in this case).


1

I don't really like xの方がyより in this order. I would rather say it like ゲームXはゲームYより難しいのはもうわかっている。 or ゲームYよりゲームXの方が難しいのはもうわかっている。


1

There are many ways but you want to be clear so perhaps the easiest is to use a different adjective to いい such as 便利. "Either is fine but X would be more convenient." If you can give the reason even better.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible