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14

You can use なる (to become) to indicate change, as follows: うまくなる (い-adjective, い->く) 上手になる (な-adjective + に) These both mean "to become good/skilled". Then for "to become more skilled" you can use もっと, さらに or 前より: もっと上手になる to become better さらに上手になる to become even better 前より上手になる to become better than before


13

舒适区 is totally unfamiliar to Japanese. I don't even know what the first two kanjis are. Anyway, if you want to emphasize the negative aspect of "comfort zone" and want to say "the place you can't stay forever", a good word for both of your examples is 「ぬるま湯【ゆ】」 (literally "tepid water"). ぬるま湯につかる = stay safe, avoid challenge, lack vitality The trip is ...


11

ポケットティッシュ is the generic term for those tissue packs. As far as I know, there is no one word for "ポケットティッシュ for promotion". Manufacturers of those tissue packs seem to call them: [販促]{はんそく}用の(ポケット)ティッシュ (販促 = abbreviation for 販売促進 (sales promotion)) [宣伝]{せんでん}用の(ポケット)ティッシュ プロモーション用の(ポケット)ティッシュ Edit: Everyone knows those promotional tissue packs, so in ...


10

I think you probably can say "[念]{ねん}のため(に)(or [一応]{いちおう})[伝]{つた}えとくけど、プリンタ[壊]{こわ}れてるよ/[故障]{こしょう}してるよ" "念のため(に)(or 一応)伝えておきますが、プリンタ壊れてますよ/故障してますよ。"(polite) "念のため(に)(or 一応)[言]{い}っとくけど、プリンタ故障してるよ。" "念のため(に)(or 一応)言っておきますけど、プリンタ故障してますよ。(polite)" or maybe more casually "(あ、)そうそう、(~~さん、)プリンタ故障してるよ/してますよ。" "(あ、)そうだ、そう言えば(~~さん、)プリンタ故障してるよ/してますよ。"


10

心掛ける is a good one to learn. 毎日Xをするように心掛けている。 I'm working hard at doing X everyday. Also, 努める or 努力する 毎日Xをするように努める(努力する) If you overly use 頑張る, it sounds strange, especially when you use it for things like "reading a newspaper". You should use it for something more "important" like studying for a test or trying to get a job or something.


10

You have to read the last sentence in the next paragraph to get your specific answer. I borrowed a good letter example from a site with a lot of business templates. First of all, you have to say the addressee's name, career, and you have to say "Sama", and it should be delimited with line breaks and followed by two line breaks (Or maybe carriage returns. ...


10

Anyone who took formal courses on Japanese would have learned this pattern: X-eba X hodo Y. The more you stir, the faster the salt dissolves. 混ぜれば混ぜるほど塩が混ざるのは早いです。 The colder the weather, the more time it takes for snow to melt. 雪が解けるのは寒ければ寒いほど時間がかかります。


9

There are also several other grammar patterns that express "as one thing changes (grows/increases/decreases/etc.) another thing changes with it" (the key is that both things are changing). (2 or 3) + につれて (cannot express volition or intention, but the rest can). アニメが流行るにつれて、日本語を学ぶ人が増えてきています。→ As anime is becoming more popular, the number of ...


8

It can be translated as 聞いたことがない 聞いたことのない歌です。 宮崎賢治のことを聞いたことがありません。


8

~ようにしている might fit the bill. For instance, 肉を食べないようにしている。 I'm trying not to eat any meat.


8

Amongst とか, など, and し, I feel only など satisfies the specific role you're talking about. There's no rule that says など must be affixed only after 2 or more examples. E.g. この難しいこと、私などには出来ません。 "A person like me cannot do a difficult thing as this". The more related examples you string before adding など makes your concept specific, as if you are placing ...


8

It sounds like you are looking for the vocative case particle in Japanese. Taken from wikipedia's article on vocative case: In archaic Japanese, or when written as verse, a particle よ and や may be affixed. 少年よ、大志を抱け (Boys, be ambitious, quote by William S. Clark) 神よ、汝の誉れはその御名のごとく (O God, Thy praise is according to Thine name, from ...


8

If you're sure you'll die and I'll read your letter after your death, then you'd say: あなたがこの手紙を読むころには、私はもう死んでいるでしょう。 あなたがこの手紙を読んでいるころには、私はもう死んでいるでしょう。 (Literally: I will already be dead when you read this letter.) If I won't read your letter if you survive, then you'd say: あなたがこの手紙を読んでいるということは、私はもう死んでいるということでしょう。 ...


8

A very common (and mature-sounding) phrase would be 「[差]{さ}し[支]{つか}えなければ」. 「差し支え」 means "obstacle", "inconvenience", etc. 「差し支えなければ、ご[職業]{しょくぎょう}をお[聞]{き}きしてもよろしいですか。」 You may add a 「もし」 at the beginning as well. Other natural expressions would include: Polite:「(もし)お[尋]{たず}ねしてもよろしければ」 Less polite:「もし聞いてもよければ」


7

毎日、ニュース記事をひとつ読んで頑張っている I'm making an effort to [read a news article every day] sounds fine to me, as long as you move the を to after 記事 (ひとつ should be used adverbially). To me, this formulation doesn't sound like the material is difficult to you. More like keeping up the habit is difficult. If, on the other hand, you say 毎日、ニュース記事をひとつ頑張って読んでいる ...


7

A rather straightforward sentence might work: 他に何かありますか。 Literally asking if there's anything else.


7

Usually that construction is achieved by using 「限り」. 知る限り (as far as one knows) できる限り (as far as possible) 生きている限り (as long as one lives) 私に関する限り (as far as I'm concerned, i.e. "for my part [but I won't speak for others, because they disagree with me]") The construction in your second sentence ("as far as I'm concerned") is usually ...


7

Flaw has a great answer, but I'll just throw out another grammatical structure that is similar is 「をはじめ」 バナナをはじめ、フルーツは健康にいい Fruits, like bananas, are good for your health. It's not the same as など per se, but it is another way but is restricted formal speeches and writing.


7

I think the closest approximation is 訳【わけ】が分からない (lit. reason is not understandable). 日本語の数え方は訳が分からない。 This is an informal expression, and depending on the context, this can be used to express your subjective, personal confusion (does not make sense to me): 日本語の数え方は私にとって訳が分からない。 ... and to express that something is objectively a mess: ...


7

Semantically, I think you can leave out "I'm currently studying Japanese" if you're saying "My Japanese isn't (yet) very good," because it's pretty much implied. Your example sounds fine. You might also try things like: すみません、日本語はまだまだです。 すみません、日本語の[初]{しょ}[心]{しん}[者]{しゃ}ですので、あまり分かりません。


7

The word that we often use to express enthusiasm is 「[是非]{ぜひ}」= "by all means". 「是非[行]{い}きます!」,「是非行きたいです!」,「是非行きましょう!」, 「是非行こう!」, etc. You can add 「あ」 or 「あっ」 in front of 「是非」, too. To express even more enthusiasm, you could use 「[絶対]{ぜったい}」 or 「[必]{かなら}ず」 in place of 「是非」.


7

I think you can use XXはYYのように聞こえる XXはYYみたいに聞こえる XXはYYに聞こえる XXはYYに(音が)似ている XXはYYみたい(だ) etc. For example... 「Sit down please」は「しらんぷり」のように聞こえます。 「I get off」って、「揚げ豆腐」みたいに聞こえるね。(casual) 「フライアー」は、「fryer」に聞こえます。 「You know me」は、「湯飲み」に(音が)似ていますね。 「What time」って、「掘った芋」みたいだね。(casual) がましい is used in set phrases like ...


6

The best way to get clarification is to ask a question that illustrates what exactly you're confused about. You've already asked these in English: "Is it a kind of cloth?" それは生地の一種ですか? (Answer: no, it's a type of clothing, not cloth) "What are the other types?" 作業着といえば他にどんなのがありますか? If you just ask "could you clarify?", your conversation partner is ...


6

For "I have never___" you take the verb, put it in the past tense, then add ことがない or ことがありません. The direct translation is something like "I don't have X experience" or "I've never done X thing" So, for 聞く, we go: 聞く --> 聞いた --> 聞いたこと --> 聞いたことがありません or to answer your initial question: その歌{うた}を聞いたことがありません。 For "I've never heard of that ...


6

As far as I know, 知っている限り(では) As far as I'm concerned 私にとっては Please take as much as you want. 御自由におとりになってください。 好きなだけおとりになってください。 as long he is alive. 生きているうちに as soon as possible できるだけ早く


6

All of them are syntactically correct, but they are semantically strange as explained below. Depending on the situation, もらう may not be polite enough. いただく will be even more polite. In the second one, 泊める is just about the night, so it is unnatural to mention 8日から9日まで, which means the whole two days (unless you are talking about both nights of 8日 and 9日, ...


6

Those are most commonly called 「[屋台村]{やたいむら}」, followed probably by 「[屋台街]{やたいがい}」, but I recommend that you stick with the former because the latter can also refer to a regular street lined with food stalls. There is one named 「かごっまふるさと屋台村」 in Kagoshima if that is the one you got drunk at last night. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=keCZt91Xj1g The word ...


6

a very mild preference How about using どちらかと言えば、どちらかと言うと、[強]{し}いて言えば、強いて言うと etc. as in どちらでも大丈夫なんですが、どちらかと言うと、~~のほうがいいです。 どちらでも大丈夫なんですが、どちらかと言えば、~~のほうが[嬉]{うれ}しいです。/ありがたいです。 どちらでもいいんですが、[強]{し}いて言えば、~~のほうが・・・。



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