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9

いただきました is past tense of いただく, which is a polite version of もらう, which means 'to receive'. 下さいました is past tense of 下さる, which is a polite version of くれる, which means 'to give'. They are different words but can be used in the same context as long as you correctly assign who is the giver and who is the receiver. But do take note that the emphasis of the ...


7

Update: I didn't comment on the fact that speaking about oneself can also be a matter of using "he" or "she" for oneself, as well as using one's own name. I have never heard anyone in Japanese use 彼【かれ】(he) or 彼女【かのじょ】(she) to refer to themselves. As far as I can tell, it has more or less the same implications that it would in English, and you can follow ...


7

あげる Usually involves the transfer of a physical object from one person to another of equal (or sometimes lower) status. 友達に洋服をあげる 与える(あたえる) Can function as あげる, but in modern Japanese it comes with a formal ring and often involves something given as a favor for someone of lower status. Beyond this, its alternate uses include "assign" as in "assign ...


6

I fully agree, this is much harder to translate (well) than one would expect. There are hundreds of nuances and scenarios covered by the English "can I help you", and you list a lot of them... So I'll focus on three very typical broad categories (I'm sure people will give you more): Strangers: Typically, offering your help finding directions to a tourist ...


6

Speaking from personal experience, I do hear the ~くれる form used this way all the time in video games and such, and it seems to me that it does carry a kind of sarcasm(the Japanese kind :D). I mostly hear やってくれたな! when the opponent does something to the person, but I seldom hear it used this way on any word besides する and やる, so I'd assume yours is a good ...


6

Use the context, Luke! In a store, when a clerk (store worker) says : Can I help you, sir? "いらっしゃいませ!" with a inquiring gaze at the customer With friends, when you see that your friend needs some help on math: Do you want a help with math?   "大丈夫?助けてあげようか?"、"大丈夫?手伝ってあげようか?" (I allow "助ける" here, for math can put people in trouble :P) Someone is carrying ...


4

Here is what I can think of now. for store worker 何かお探しですか? math, 数学に関して困った事あったら言ってくださいね to help carrying heavy stuff お荷物お持ちいたしましょうか? I wanna help to make cookies. クッキー作るとき手伝ってもいい? Son, please help me cleaning the dishes. お皿洗ってくれる? thanks for your help. 手伝ってくれてありがとうね / 助かった It's my pleasure どういたしまして / よかった (for 助かった) ...


4

Polite forms are like this kureru → kuremasu → kudasaimasu morau → moraimasu → itadakimasu So, if you want to use polite form, use kudasaimasu, or itadakimasu depends on situation. or choose the formers if you prefer normal form. Difference between kuremasu and moraimasu is depends on the side of the subject. She gave me an apple (りんごを彼女がくれました) I ...


4

[v]な is an order, in plain imperative form: "Don't [v]." [v]ないでくれ is a request/plea: "Please don't [v]." (It is basically the plain form of [v]ないでください, since 〜てくださる is the respectful form 尊敬語 of 〜てくれる.) Both [v]な and [v]ないでくれ are in plain form and cannot be used in situations where respectful (尊敬語) and/or polite (丁寧語) forms are required (e.g. talking to ...


4

Lukman already gave a nice answer, but let me add some comments in the context of the question. The question is about ~ていただきました and ~てくださいました, two different methods of making 敬語 out of other verbs. While strictly speaking Lukman’s answer focuses on the basic use of いただきました and くださいました as receiving and giving physical items, the same explanation also ...


4

Decent usage for "giving something to oneself" would be "自分へのご褒美する" And regarding あげる and くれる for those, you can't use くれる, because 自分にプレゼントをくれた, still means someone gave you present.


3

Just being curious: where did you learn about the correctness of the two first ones? I can't recall hearing anything like that ever. In a similar way, even if gramatically correct, your other sentences with the "I" subject feel very unnatural to me. I believe that a natural way to express self rewarding would be: "プレセントを買わせてもらいましょう", where context and ...


3

This is just my personal opinion, but I thought I'd share it. I don't think 私は私にプレゼントをあげた / 僕は僕にプレゼントをあげた are correct, because you can't あげる something to 私. You would have to もらう or くれる it. On the other hand, I see 私は自分にプレゼントをあげた as possibly being grammatically correct, as 自分 is a reflexive pronoun — different from 私 and 僕 which are non-reflexive. ...


2

Looking up くれる in the dictionary leads to this second definition (which I have never heard in modern Japanese except for the form くれてやる): 2 自分が相手にものを与える。また、相手に対してある行為をしたり、加えたりする。相手を与え手より低い者として卑しめる気持ちを込めた言い方で、「くれてやる」の形になることも多い。「鳥にえさを―・れる」「盆栽に水を―・れる」「平手打ちを―・れてやる」 So, basically, くれる by itself can mean to give something to someone else in the first ...


2

〜てあげる is the form of "doing X for someone". The quote is just the combination of that and the 〜たい form (want to do). So it is "I want to do X for you". Of course, remember that 〜てあげる should not be used for 目上の人, and even when used properly might sound patronizing in the wrong context.


2

A young girl can use her first name to refer to herself in informal situations. And this gives the impression of acting cutesy. There's no rule that says it's only limited to girls, but statistically speaking this method of self-address is more common in girls than boys, men, or even women.



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