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8

Yes, you are missing something important in the second sentence 「よく道を聞いてもらいます。」. Your understanding of the first is good, judging from the TL. The second sentence, by the way, is 100% grammatical but its content/meaning is more than just weird. It is highly unlikely that a policeman would say it unless there was an incredibly super-shy policeman ...


7

Technically, it exists, but as a Japanese-speaker, I would NOT recommend that you actively use it --- at least not on a regular basis. As @Chocolate stated in the comment above, 「~~させられうる」 is the form. Your sentence “It is possible that she may make you eat her cooking.” can be said in Japanese as: 「ボクは[彼女]{かのじょ}に[自分]{じぶん}の[料理]{りょうり}を[食]{た}べさせられうる。」 ...


5

It's a different way of saying the causative-passive 行かせられる, so it means that the speaker was made to go to the hospital. Note in an earlier version of this answer I confidently asserted that this is a more colloquial example. A comment was posted to the contrary and, after researching it more in depth, I was surprised to find I was indeed wrong in that ...


5

A) 1) 食べる羊 can be ① "the sheep that eats" 羊 is the subject for 食べる. 「羊が食べる」>>「食べる羊」 ② "the sheep to eat" "the sheep you/someone eat(s)" 羊 is the object for 食べる. 「羊を食べる」>>「食べる羊」 2) 食べられる羊 When the 羊 is the subject for 食べられる. 「羊が食べられる」>>「食べられる羊」 The (ら)れる can be: ① a passive auxiliary verb. "the sheep that is eaten" eg.狼に食べられる羊 ② a potential auxiliary verb. ...


4

In the verb+noun construction (in fact, this is a sentence+noun construcion), there is no strict rule that the noun is meant to be a subject for the verb's action. This is the most frequent case but no rule at all. The noun can also be a direct object, an indirect object, or something just associated with the action. Thus, 食べる人 can mean "the person that ...


3

The main thing to take into account here is the ~てもらう that's used in the second sentence. With this construction, the subject receives the benefit of an action. To illustrate: 母【はは】に晩【ばん】ご飯【はん】を作【つく】ってもらった。 (My mother made dinner for me.) 先生【せんせい】に文章【ぶんしょう】を読【よ】んでもらった。 (The teacher read the sentence for us.) So in this case, it's not simply that ...


3

It's true that 〜(ら)れる is often referred to as a "passive" form because that's one of its main uses, but it has other uses as well. They can be divided into four categories: 受身 - passive (most common) 可能 - potential 尊敬 - honorific 自発 - spontaneous (least common) This is an example of the potential use of 〜(ら)れる, here inflected to the negative 〜れない, ...


1

It is 猫に逃げられた, which expresses the fact that the speaker has suffered some damage from the event. 私は can be placed at the beginning but it is not essential. Native speakers would omit it over 95% of the time. 猫が逃げられた makes no sense whatsoever. However, something like 猫がネズミに逃げられた。 makes sense. The cat is the one that suffered damage from letting the ...


1

For starters, could 「・・・食べる食事」 also mean: "a meal that (I/you/we) ("can"/will) eat"? And couldn't 「・・・食べられる食事」 mean something more like: "a meal that (I/you/we) (can/are able to) eat"? Context is important, though, as well; I'd be scared if the food was the one who was doing the eating... ;)



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