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3

Let's minimize the example. そこには私一人しかいなかった。 そこには私しかいなかった。 私しかいなかった。 私しかいない。 Here しか is actually a particle, i.e. a binding particle (係助詞 kakari-joshi) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_particles


0

I would translate 恋愛ごとと断絶していた as "stayed away from romantic matters." 恋愛ごと can include but not limited to love affairs.


4

You are parsing that part incorrectly. There is no such word 「ごとと」. It should be parsed as: 「[恋愛]{れんあい}ごと + と + 断絶していた」 「恋愛ごと」 means "love-related matters". You will encounter this usage of 「ごと」 quite often. See definition 二-12-㋐ in : https://kotobank.jp/word/%E4%BA%8B-502856#E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.9E.97.20.E7.AC.AC.E4.B8.89.E7.89.88 「と」 is of ...


4

In your sentence, 「恋愛ごとと」 consists of following parts: 恋愛 + ごと + と And ごと comes from こと(事), which means anything related to the noun before ごと。In this sentence, 「恋愛ごと」 means anything related to love affairs. Another example, 人ごととは思えない (I don't think it's an affair of other people), 人ごと is often written as 他人事 私事(わたくしごと) personal matter, personal ...


6

「[緊 急 招 集]{きんきゅうしょうしゅう}とは、おだやかではないな。」 = "An emergency call-out is pretty disquieting, isn't it?" This 「とは」 is not for defining something. Both speaker and listener know exactly what 「緊急招集」 means already. This 「とは」 is to express a surprise, anger, excitement, etc. You did not expect it coming.


0

It's the conjuncitve (te-form) of だ; the conjunctive, among other things, can express 'and': 目を開けて、木を見た 'I opened my eyes and looked at a tree.'


4

で, in this case, functions like the -て form of the copula だ. Thus, it's used to connect two sentences together to make a single, natural-sounding sentence. 私の名前はみのりだ。十五さいです。My name is Minori. I am 15 years old. 私の名前はみのりで、十五さいです。My name is Minori and I am 15 years old. This is the same as what the normal -て form does: 朝ご飯を食べた。そして、急いで学校へ行った。I ate ...


2

「たんじょうびに [田中]{たなか}さんから( ) [何]{なに}を もらったんですか。」 = "What did you get from Tanaka for your birthday?" The sentence is already grammatical without a word in the blank after 「から」, but if you had to place one, 「は」 woud be the only correct particle among the four. Why 「は」, then? This 「は」 in 「田中さんからは」 is the contrastive 「は」, not the subject-marker 「は」 ...


0

your are right but you asked ライブラリにだった(I was in the library) is wrong you should use ita...iru is a verb used for human and animated things. desu(datta) is a sentence ending particle..


0

You're on the right track. Off the top of my head, で denotes action at a location, can also be used to connect multiple clauses in a sentence, means of an action, and also cause of effect. に on the other hand is used for direction of a subject, existence of a subject, or action at an event. For the most part it should be relatively easy to distinguish when ...


2

Early stages of Japanese did not have relative clauses, but it was possible to modify nouns with attributive verbs (using contemporary lexicon/morphology for ease): 咲く丘 a hill where something grows I believe that from early stages, there was little restriction on the semantic role of 丘 in the action of 咲く, i.e. all this is really saying is "a hill that ...


5

Roughly, 「やで」 is the Kansai equivalent of the Kanto 「だよ」. It is an affirmation sentence-ender. 「しとるんやで」≒「してるんだよ」


2

The answers in that old thread do not satisfy me, either. My suggestion for a better translation of the 「というのに」 part in your sentence would simply be "while". I would not buy the dictionary definition of "even though" in this particular case. The difference between 「のに」 and 「というのに」 is minimal in meaning and yet two-fold. 1) 「のに」 sounds more informal ...


0

Here is my attempt on this question (made possible thanks to user4092's answer and comments): 〇〇と〜 can pretty much attach onto any predicate it wants to, and (literally speaking) means "do ~ with the sound of 〇〇". (Or even more relaxed maybe, like "do ~ with a resemblance to 〇〇.") It can even attach all the way outside of the negation (like in your ...


0

◯◯を △△と 言う stands for "to call ◯◯ △△" or "to express ◯◯ as △△ by utterance". In the case of 「どこに住んでるの?」と「い」を言わなかったり, you can regard it as "she saved saying い like どこに住んでるの".


3

If it were me, I would say 今日から二週間後[に]、東京へ行く。 I don't think 後 is usually considered a particle (助詞). 二週間 = a duration of two weeks. So you need to express after that duration has passed.


1

「まさか、こんな”[辺境]{へんきょう}”にまでお[逃]{に}げになられるとはねエ・・・ 」 To give it my own TL, "Good Lord! How you/he/she escaped all the way to this remote place!" Why is と even used there? And what's with は? It is 「とは」 that we should be looking at here. 「~~~とは」 expresses the speaker's surprise, anger, excitement, etc. The important thing is that one can end a ...


2

On the one hand, を in this case indicates the direct object. You are talking Japanese. On the other hand で indicates the means by which you accomplish the action. You are talking in Japanese, or talking using Japanese. Note that both sentences could be extended : 電話で日本語を話す : I talk Japanese on the phone (using the phone). 日本語で起{お}こった事{こと}を話す : I talk in ...


2

"Hunters exist as a food source." This translation clearly makes no sense and needless to say, it is not what the original means, either. Basically, you are making at least two mistakes here. 「[食糧]{しょくりょう}として[狩]{か}る[者]{もの}たちが[存在]{そんざい}する。」 You are not "seeing" the unmentioned direct object for the verb 「[狩]{か}る」 = "to hunt". In Japanese, it is ...



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