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2

I think 少しでも is 少し + でも meaning "even if a little". In this sentence, it would apply to how the hiding place would make it hard to become a target. Translating quite literally: 少しでもターゲットになりにくそうな僻地 remote places which seemed like making it harder to become targets, even if by a little As for と, I'm not completely sure but it may mean "attempt to ...


1

Although your application of grammatical rules is on the whole technically correct you need to consider context. A is thanking B for doing something for him (not anybody else). This affects what information you need to include in the sentence: 私 does not usually take が, 私は is more common, if it needs to be said at all. So; If you are saying thank you ...


0

Yes, when the subject of a sentence of neutral description (現象文) is pronoun これ・それ or a noun modified with この・その. (Opening the refrigerator) あっ、この納豆 φ 腐ってる! Without この that would be あっ、納豆が腐ってる!. この納豆が腐ってる is "it is this natto that is rotten" and would be ungrammatical for a sentence of neutral description. この納豆は… would be a contrasive sentence.


-1

I don't know if this is correct, but I think the construction 習おうと思っている could be translated literally as 'I'm thinking (to myself): let's learn'. 習おう is the same construction you would use to suggest doing something. You could for example say 日本語を習おう (meaning: Let's learn Japanese!)


2

You're 90% there. Let's take your list in order, shall we? 1. Quotation Particle As you noted, if you see it followed by a verb indicating expression (思う、言う、話す, etc.) then it's being used in this manner. 2. Conditional Particle The following sentence is the way I was taught to use this one: 秋になると、葉が落ちる。 "When autumn comes, the leaves fall." In ...


1

カレン: バイオリンを習おうと思っているんですが、いい先生を知りませんか。 As written, が is being used as a gentle lead-in. It's adding a sense of "I'm probably bothering you by asking, but...".


4

Your translation is correct. However, this が isn't the "but" one. It's the "softener" one. I can't think of a way to translate it (if there even is one), but it's often used to make one's own desires/actions seem less direct and a little more humble. Ex. 聞きたいことがあるんですが... → There's something I'd like to ask you... The difference between ...


5

ころ means "around", "about", or "(at) the time". So it translates to: At the time I'd just come back to London, ... Note that it's come to London, not come back from London. Other common usages include 子供のころ → When I was a child 高校生のころ → When I was in high school


9

We are actually discussing TWO different kinds of 「や」 here, which is probably why you are more confused than you should be. In 「くつろいでくれや」, the 「や」 is a colloquial sentence-ending particle for 1) imperative, 2) invitation and 3) request. You are saying "(Please) make yourself at home." In 「それが実はアイロンではないからや」, the 「や」 is a dialectal sentence-ender mostly for ...


1

I conjecture it is from ぬ <- の. Why? Okinawan actually has a regular sound change ぬ -> ん. For example, 犬{いぬ} -> いん. So I presume that somehow the regular sound changes got applied twice, and you get ん <- ぬ <- の.


0

If you list to people speaking, usually after they say は there is a slight pause. This also happens in English when we are staying something...... and then want to say something about it. 医療用や通信用など、用途は広い。 This sounds like a line from a documentary. In medicine, communication - its uses ..... are VAST! The point of the sentence is that the usages are vast, ...


-2

It's a small version of の just as you guessed. This happens a lot in Japanese, I wouldn't be surprised if you hear it elsewhere in Okinawa. Searching the net, I found that the word has been translated to normal Japanese: ウチナーンチュ is literally equal to 沖縄の人 we already know ウチナー is Okinawa and チュ is person, so the only remaining thing is the it could be is ...


0

Adding just a bit more to Mr. Kawaguchi's answer, I think that 家を出る is usually heard in a situation where someone (a teenager, a spouse) leaves the home where they are "supposed to be", often under not good circumstances (running away from home, domestic violence, imminent divorce, ...). C.f. 家出 In this case, the situation is about a presumably unmarried ...


2

First, 全部の人 is an obscure expression because 全部 is a counter for objects* (that said, 私が知っている人全部のうち sounds to some extent better for some reason), so I'd translate "all of the people" to 私が知っているすべての人 or 私が知っている人全員、私が知っている人すべて. As for your question, yes, the sentence with うち is correct too and you can omit the particle で after うち. If you use に instead of で, ...


3

から is really only used to designate the location/point/time from which things start, whereas を is a rather generic particle. Because of this, から makes the reader mentally picture a time range (今夜から明日にかけて雪になります), a motion (東京から大阪へは3時間かかります), a coverage (揺りかごから墓場まで), etc. In contrast, を just doesn't have this sense of motion/breadth/width. And so when this ...


3

Generally speaking a sentence ending in の will be less formal equivalent of the "の/んです" construction. Hence: Questions ending in の, as in your examples, are less formal equivalents of the same questions ending in んですか. Likewise Questions ending in the plain/past form are less formal equivalents of (in your examples) questions ending with ...


0

As you seem to have already answered yourself in your own translations, "の" with accent/intonation in the end turns a sentence into a question. Note however that if you don't put such an emphasis in the end, "の" just act as a slight softner of the sentence and doesn't turn the sentence into a question. This form sounds like a child speak, so I don't ...


0

I'm not sure if my answer will suffice because I don't know what you know and don't have perfect comprehension of how this works. I will start with what I know: 象は鼻が長い。 This translates to "elephants have long noses" One of the most basic distinctions is that は is used for categorical statements and が to refer to particulars. The second thing going in ...


3

は is fairly matter of fact. "Where is Shinjuku?" って is a little more nuanced. Its like "Oh, now that you mention Shinjuku...where is it?" or "Speaking of Shinjuku, where is that?" For all intents and purposes I gather the actual end-point meaning is the same but って is linking it more with something that has been previously said whilst は could just be ...


1

A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar has the following to say about this: When って is attached to a noun, it is close in meaning to the topic marker は。When って is attached to a sentence as in 外国で暮らすって難しいね。 it is closer in meaning to 「..というのは、..」. However, it is more colloquial and emotive than は and というのは。In fact, if the predicate does ...


5

I am going to say that in this context, 「と」 ≠ 「として」. I would call it the quotative 「と」. 「『[変人]{へんじん}』と[面白]{おもしろ}がられていた」 = 「『変人』と[呼]{よ}ばれ面白がられていた」 The verb form 「面白がられていた」 is in the "passive voice past progressive". The subject of this is タモリ in the original Japanese, but it would be difficult to retain that in an English translation. I myself would ...


4

There are probably people that teach that が can only mark subjects. I don't like that theory, since it makes it really hard to explain some other things. So I will proceed under the assumption that が can also mark objects of stative verbs (adjectives like 好き, verbs like 分かる, the ~たい form and the ~える・れる potential form etc). In fact, it seems that が and を are ...


1

Short answer: と = and (giving an exhaustive list where you're enumerating everything) も = also (could be creating a new list or adding to an existing list) や = things like...and... (clearly only giving samples from the list) More detailed answer: I'll start by stealing one of my examples from whats the difference between し and と? ...



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