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Usage of の devides into (1) pronoun and (2) nominalizer. 難しいのと簡単なやつ、どっちがいい? Which do you like, difficult one and easy one? それが難しいのは知っている I know that it's difficult. And, when the nominalizer appears in the position of the predecate of the sentence, we call it "explanatory/emphasizing の". Speaking of your examples, you can regard この中でどれが一番難しいのですか and ...


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First of all, 「日本で車が速い。」 seems unnatural to me. I would use the topic marker and say 「日本では車が速い。」 In Japanese an adjective can be thought of as a verb, as in Klingon. Think of it as action of "being fast".


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Japanese adjectives (形容詞) form independent predicates, that means, they grammatically act as verbs (速い means "be fast"). Again, all verbs except for ones referring to "staying" (e.g. ある, いる, 住む, 泊まる etc.) mark their locations by で. The same thing applies to all word classes (with the help of copula だ): Verb: 日本で走る run in Japan Adjective: 日本で安い be ...


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「だって」 is not a constituent in your sentence. 「悟飯くんだって」 is an abbreviation of 「悟飯くんだということ」 in casual speech. How the abbreviation takes place At the very beginning: 悟飯くんだということ 「と」 is replaced by 「って」: 悟飯くんだっていうこと 「いう」 is dropped: 悟飯くんだってこと 「こと」 is dropped: 悟飯くんだって Similar instances なんで好きだってばれたんですか。 女の子だってばれちゃうじゃない?


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I'm a native Japanese speaker, and I definitely can't tell the difference between g and ng. I grew up in the Kanto region, and I'm not sure if I use the g and the ng interchangeably or not. I might know how to pronounce the ng, I'm not sure. But anyway, how you make a sound in Japanese isn't as important as using the correct intonation, which might be ...


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1) 「XもXでも」「XもYでも」is primarily used for emphasis. In English you might say, "I'll do it again and again!" Here, again is used twice to emphasize that you'll do it again. Similarly, in Japanese, 何度も何度でも, "Many many times, as many times (as it takes)", is repeated to emphasize the speaker's intention. 2) Primarily, emphasis will be lost. For example compare ...


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It's pretty much as you described it. In this case, で is more of an "in", but not for a time or place, rather a setting. The same usage is seen in English, too, like "I injured myself in battle" "I hurt myself in [a game of] soccer". It's pretty intuitive, and the same happens in many languages, with the reasoning being that you're treating ...


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From my understanding because 日記 and 部屋 are marked with を it adds the implication that the subject/topic of the sentence (僕) is the owner of the 日記 and 部屋 since he was affected by his little sister acting out the verb. Is this correct? Yes. But maybe your understanding about why it works in that way is not enough correct. 僕は in your example #1 and #2 is ...


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I agree with all your logic except for example #2. When using the the passive with を, it's only for a negative, or undesirable effect. If someone cleans your room, 99% of the time it's them doing you a favour, so the passive + を does not work for this case. In that case you'd say 僕は妹に部屋を掃除してもらった。 → My little sister cleaned my room (for me). ...


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Either 日記が妹に読まれた or 僕は妹に日記が読まれた sound a slip up of …日記を…, otherwise they sound unnatural. (People won't find it so much odd as a slip up.) The structure itself can be used in other examples like この国では日記が多くの人に読まれている, but that specific example is not natural. You wrote "it implies that a person (subject marked with は) was affected", but that doesn't ...


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Isn't there also a difference depending on whether the verb is transitive or intransitive? eg. 電気を消す。 Turn off the lights. 電気が消える。 Lights turn off. Intransitive verbs tend to follow ga while wo preceeds transitive.


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First of all, 「入り方」 is read 「はいりかた」 --「かた」, not 「がた」. It means "how to 入る". Although OP has not provided enough context, I am going to jump the gun and post an answer. 「入る」 here looks like it is being used for its slang meaning of "to start a performance". It is used rather heavily in show biz since many performers think the beginning part is important ...


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Pretty sure it's 入{い}り方{かた}, which here means "way/means of entering [the contest]". And こだわる here is probably "insist on, make fuss about". So, I get something like: "Do you really want to get me into that contest no matter what?" Check a grammar book about the ~方 suffix.


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It is 「は」, not 「わ」. The 「は」 here is of course pronounced 「わ」 because it is a particle. 「もう[早送]{はやおく}りでよいのでは!」 = 「もう早送りでよいのではないか (ないだろうか, ないでしょうか, etc.)!」 The last part is not said but is understood between the speaker and listener. This happens so very often in Japanese. "Maybe we should just fast-forward it from here on?" 「のでは」 is used to make a ...


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Short answer: nominalization. In this case, it's not really a quirk of the Japanese language, at least you're doing pretty much the same in English as well. In English, we don't say *My hobby is play the guitar. *As for my hobby, play the guitar. The pattern A is B needs two things (either a noun, or mentioning a word or phrase, as in swim is ...


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The former (未然形+ないで) is a light negative command, the latter (終止形+な) is a strong negative command (prohibition). (終止形+なよ) is often (not always) a friendly / playful command. ~して ⇔ ~しないで ~しろ ⇔ ~するな 宿題をするの忘れないでね (like a mother to her child, "don't forget to do your homework") 宿題をするの忘れるなよ (depending on tone, a friendly, "you'd better not forget to do your ...



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