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Edit: How about reading it this way: 「[親にまで馬鹿にされるから]いけない。」 = 「親にまで馬鹿にされるからいやだ・馬鹿にされるのがいけない・いやだ。」 (Lit. It's no good since you're made a fool of even by your own parent. I hate it that I'm made a fool of even by my own parent.) It's saying 「[親にまで馬鹿にされるから](盲目は)いけない。」(Lit. I am looked down on even by my own parent, so being blind is not good.)


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Dictionary form: 「Te-form of Verb A + から + に + する 」 Imperative form: 「Te-form of Verb A + から + に + しろ(or せよ) 」 This is a common set phrase meaning "Do (something) only after doing A." The translation you provided is passable but is certainly not a very literal one. 「[早]{はや}く[寝]{ね}るのはいいけど、せめて[晩飯食]{ばんめしく}って[風呂入]{ふろはい}ってからにしろ。」 In this ...


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と -in the sense of A and B- and や can only be used to connect nouns or noun-phrases, but they cannot be used to connect adjectives and verbs. Therefore this sentence would be wrong: x 日本語クラスは簡単なと面白いと楽しい。 But you can say this: ○ 日本語クラスといえば、「簡単な」と「面白い」と「楽しい」という言葉を思い出す。 Regarding Japanese classes, I think of [the words] "easy/simple" and ...


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There's no subordinate clause here. That's coordinate clauses: だけどかつのはいつも金太郎だ・です and おおきな体のくまさんでも金太郎にはかてません。で in 金太郎で is the continuative form of the auxiliary だ. The topic in だけどかつのはいつも金太郎だ is かつの, "the one who wins", and the subject in おおきな体のくまさんでも金太郎にはかてません is おおきな体のくまさん. でも, "even", has replaced the subject marker が.


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だけど勝{か}つのは何時{いつ}も金太郎で大{おお}きな体{からだ}の熊{くま}さんでも金太郎には勝{か}てません So let's start from the beginning: だけど introduces a contrast with the previous sentence similar to but or although. 勝つのは nominalizes 勝つ and introduces it as the subject using particle は, thus the one who wins is 何時も adverb meaning always 金太郎で: This is the part stating that it's Kintarô who ...


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It is 「の + に」 in two words. It is not the 「のに」= "despite" that you thought it was. The 「の」 nominalizes the adjective 「[平凡]{へいぼん}な」. In meaning, 「平凡なの」=「平凡なこと」. 「に」 is the correct particle to use in 「~~に[失望]{しつぼう}する」= "to be disappointed with" The translator is correct. There is no "despite" in there to begin with.


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These are colloquial Japanese for という, ところ and ~ないで. ここ数日というところ means 'around the last few days'.


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Your translation shows your complete understanding of the phrase even if you do not like it yourself. A difficulty this relative clause could present for the translator is the fact that 「霞む」 is an intransitive verb and that is not the action either performed by or against 「打突」, the main noun of the relative clause. What I often do in such cases is that I ...


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This isn't literal but it seems natural: 妹の誕生日に人形をあげました。


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Don't treat 「とは」 as a single unit. 「〜と違う」 means "different from". This 「と」 is the one normally glossed as "with", although I can't think of a way to use that gloss here. When 「〜と違う」 is used in the outermost layer of the sentence, it is normally becomes 「〜とは違う」. While I can't give a technical explanation of why this is the case, I'd say the hand-wavey one ...


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To say 「誕生日に」>「誕生日は」 in OP's context is very Japanese-as-a-foreign-language-esque. There is absolutely nothing wrong or unnatural in saying 「誕生日は」. In fact, 「は」 would be a very natural choice among native speakers. To attach 「は」, the word does not have to be the grammatical subject of the sentence.


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As @Eric mentioned, に is the correct choice, and there is no harm in having two of them in this sentence. In addition to that, you could use には to emphasize that it was specifically for her birthday instead of some other occasion. 誕生日には妹に人形をあげました。 → For her birthday, I gave my little sister a doll. Note that you can also use [贈]{おく}る for giving a ...


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There is no problem having two に particles in one sentence. Your original choice is most correct. Using [event]+に is the best way to express that something will happen for [event], and [person]+にあげる happens to also be the best way to express that you are giving something to [person]. 誕生日{たんじょうび}に妹{いもうと}に人形{にんぎょう}をあげました。


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Here, とは is just pointing out that we're defining a characteristic of the N700 group. (The と is the quotative particle, but I don't think that really helps in parsing this.) どこが違う? is not asking for a definition per se, but for defining a characteristic. Your translation is pretty close. Literally, I'd translate it as something like: Where is the ...


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「オレ[憎]{にく}たらしさには [自身]{じしん}があったが あいつだけはぜったい[勝]{か}てん。」 First off, this sentence is highly colloquial and the speaker omits a couple of particles. That may be causing part of your confusion. The conjunction 「が」 in the middle is actually a key word here that would help one understand the last half of the sentence. "I had confidence in my own 憎たらしさ, but ...


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「カンニングをしているところを [見]{み}つかる。」= "I am found cheating (on the test)." This sentence is 100% grammatical. If you analyzed it using the grammar of another language, however, it might look as though it were ungrammatical. 「見つかる」 , as you stated, is an intransitive verb, but it happens to fall into a group of intransitive verbs that hold the ...


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I will preface this answer by saying there is no hard-and-fast rule, like with most particles, about when to use と and when to use こと. So, I'll try to stick directly to the context you provided. と The particle と is used in quite a few ways, but in this particular case (haha, get it?) it's a quoting particle. 明日{あした}も雨{あめ}です。 It will rain tomorrow, ...



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