New answers tagged

1

I teach Japanese, and have the basic particles pretty well sussed out for teaching purposes. I recently began to take up learning Latin. I had already encountered Korean and the almost but not quite mirror imaging of postpositional particles. But Latin for an English speaker provides the best comparison, but it is most definitely NOT a 1:1 comparison. For ...


5

I wanted to say "I want to hear Asuka-chan play the piano!" The easiest and most common way to say that would be by nominalizing Asuka's action of playing the piano. How do we do that? It is very simple. First, form a regular sentence meaning "Asuka plays the piano." 「あすかちゃんはピアノを[弾]{ひ}く」 Now, change the 「は」 to 「が」 and add 「の」 at the very end. ...


2

Two other ways to say this: 二週間したら東京へ行く。 二週間[経]{た}ったら東京へ行く。 The verb する in the first one is roughly equivalent to the verb 経つ in the second one, and both mean "to pass time".


3

Those are what I might call the "conjunctive filler phrases", which often add very little, if at all, in the way of meaning but somehow help create a softening effect (a good rhythm) that native speakers tend to instinctively "seek" in spoken Japanese. We use so many of those in spontaneous spoken language. A fairly comprehensive list can be found here. ...


4

Everything looks okay except for the pronunciation of 20才(20 years old). It's pronounced 「にじゅっさい」 or more commonly 「はたち」. Edit: Cantonese is かんとんご(広東語)so you'll probably say like: (私は*)オスカーです。せんこうはコンピューター・サイエンスで、にねんせいです。たんじょうびは[十二月]{じゅうにがつ}[三十日]{さんじゅうにち}で、はたちです。しゅっしんはオークランドで、かんとんごをはなします**。 *私は can be left out to sound more natural. **「~をはなします」 might ...


0

で (de) usually means "at" in English...kind of.. Think of "at" meaning the same as "because" like: "The answer to your problem is (AT) this cause." "We found what was (AT) the root of the problem." etc. ato de = later. Not in a different place, but AT a different time or situation. (Unless you consider time a fourth directional dimension, but that's ...


2

I've seen this usage once in awhile, and haven't felt any difference in the meaning, but I did a search in Japanese to see what I could find. This (you may need to set EUC encoding to view this properly) is a pretty long treatment on the subject in Japanese, but the summary is that originally this final と was used, but at present this is omitted most of the ...


1

In the sentence Honne o motomeru is o/wo (を) the correct particle to use? Yes. What particle should I use with “motomeru”? The reason why "を" is the correct particle for your example clause, is because "求める" is a transitive verb, and "本音" is the object. In addition to transitive verbs, there are intransitive verbs. Usually you can either find ...


1

私は無理です may be colloquially passable, but is logically incorrect, because you are saying “I am impossible” or “I am impossibility.” Clearly you are not “impossible” entity. 私には無理です means (そのことを行うのは)私には(私にとっては) 無理(なこと)です‐“It’s impossible (or difficult) for me (to do it), “ and sounds perfect to me. Japanese language is pretty loose in distinguishing noun and ...


1

I am actually not sure if "僕は無理です” is technically incorrect grammar. I can imagine a group of people talking about whether that would ever climb a mountain, and one of them says "僕は。。。。やっぱり無理です”. As "〜は” can mean "as for ~", I don't see a major difference in meaning between 僕は and 僕には in this case. I would be interested to hear from any native speakers to ...


1

I think you've answered it yourself: に gives the sense of "for". Consider "For me, it's impossible" vs. "Me, I'm [figuratively] impossible."


2

I looked up Tepra (テプラ) on google images and its a handheld machine makes something like nameplates on the go. Please correct if I am wrong! Anyway, this usage of でしたか is as straight-forward as it gets: past tense of です + question particle か. Listing consecutive items using か gives a " [this] or [that]" list, like in your example. ...


2

This 「で」 expresses the cause or reason for an action or situation. "I got into a fight with him because of money matters." 「で」 is amazing and so is 「に」 and so is 「も」 and.... Without particles, life has no meanings.


1

「どの」=「いずれの」 = "each and every (one of the items mentioned)" 「どの + Noun + も + Verb or Adjective Phrase」 = "Every (noun) [that have been mentioned] is/does ~~~." This 「も」 does not mean "also". It expresses the complete kind of affirmation or negation. In other words, it is saying that there is no exception (to what one is saying). ...


0

どの+noun+も+positive predicate = every noun ... どの+noun+も+negative predicate = no noun ... So in this case: Every/each festival is of a grand scale.


1

It's not technically impossible to use 時間が… for questions (unlike sentences of statement that represent speaker's judgement) but it may sound like you suspect that they have time. Usually, you use a sentence that contains some topic when you ask people and expect them to reply, for them to follow the topic you have staked.


0

One option that might be overlooked is to omit the particle, as opposed to choosing "は" or "が". In this case, it would sound much closer to "は" than "が". Personally, I would go with this third option, in most cases. Nonetheless, I concur that context really is important when discussing Japanese. There are cases when one would sound correct, and the other ...


4

As a native speaker, I would also definitely choose your second sentence using 「は」 if you just asked me: "Which phrase is more natural in a situation where I ask a friend if they had time?" without giving any more specific information. In other words, the exact context. What is the situation in which you are asking this friend if s/he has time? What ...


5

I'm amused to read all of your native Japanese speaking friends chose 時間はあります. To me 時間があります and 時間はあります sound the same, and look interchangeable as a postpositional particle - は、が following the subject.. If I was asked which of が and は I would choose in the following examples, I would choose バッテリーの交換は30分かかります。(お待ちいただく)時間はありますか? ...


2

Just the same as if there was only one person: AdamとSarahはすしが好{す}きです。 The topic of the conversation, marked by は, is the pair of both Adam and Sarah. Topics can be very complex phrases; they don't have to be just single words.


2

The particle will be the same regardless of number, so you would use は. Whether it's one person or two hundred people who like sushi, the particle will not change. AdamとSarahはすしがすきです。


1

Unfortunately, 「[何]{なん}で」 does not mean "why" here. Thinking that it does would make one go crazy over this line. 「[自分]{じぶん}とは[何]{なん}でどこへ[向]{む}かうべきか」= 「自分とは何で、どこへ向かうべきか」= 「自分とは何であり、(そして)どこへ向かうべきか」 (あり=あって) 「何」 means "what". "Who" might fit better in the context, though. 「とは」 is an emphatic topic marker. 「か」 is a question marker. Why am ...


10

This に is not a location marker. In this article about the particle に: Source "Ni" indicates an agent or a source in passive or causative verbs. It translates into "by" or "from". 母にしかられた。 I was scolded by my mother. トムに英語を教えてもらった。 I was taught English by Tom. The verb in question, 見つかる, is categorized as a passive-like verb ...


2

In your case, you are asking about a specific construct: the use of purposeに+verb of movement To express: Going somewhere to do something This pattern can take two kinds of objects as purpose: The ~ます stem of a verb: "Going somewhere to verb'. Note that is similar to nominalizing the verb, see for example this question. A noun: "Going ...


1

[verb in masu-form + に行く] essentially means go to {place} to do {verb} So, in this case : おじいさんは山に行く。 The old man is going to the mountain 何故山に行くのか? Why is he going to the mountain? 木を切りに行く。 He's going to chop wood Does that make things a little clearer?


2

で is a conjunctive (or adverbial) form of copula (だ or である) and さ is a filler. (Since this さ follows a conjunctive form, it's not a sentence ending particle.) It's not particularly either masculine or feminine. The verb being the conjunctive form means that the sentence doesn't end there.


1

Just use a pause, although this would be informal. 彼、寿司好き. Although, I don't see why you can't repeat using a は. 食べ物は彼は寿司が好きです。 Why is this not an option for you? Can you give examples or more context?



Top 50 recent answers are included