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4

[一日や半日][[朝から夕程度の][短い]期間]のこと "a half or full day; a morning-to-evening-scale, short time interval" The の in 朝から夕程度の can be understood as である. The comma after 朝から夕程度の makes it so that 朝から夕程度の and 短い are two separate ways of describing the interval, as opposed to further refining the type of "short time interval" it is. (Imagine removing the comma after ...


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Well, first off, that's not really a complete sentence, it's just a brief definition. This grammar is everything up to the の modifies the 短い期間 which by itself is already pretty good defintion. The commas like in English is just reiterating or defining the same thing, so in this case it's like saying: A small period of time such as from morning to evening; ...


3

When I read this question, I instantly remembered an English sentence that looked and felt very strange when I was struggling to learn English many years ago. That sentence was: "I came home sick." My Japanese-speaking brain just kind of refused to accept it. To me, at least a word was missing in front of the last word "sick". I think I was unconsciously ...


5

This か is the same as the particle we see all the time at the end of an interrogative sentence. It's also used in a noun clause like so: いつ車を売りますか? When do they sell the cars? いつ車を売るか (noun clause) when they sell the cars 今日は日曜日ですか? Is it Sunday today? 今日は日曜日か (noun clause) whether it is Sunday today Therefore, "車の会社がいつごろこのような自動運転の車を売り始めるか" ...


4

「[僕]{ぼく}の[人生]{じんせい}が[変]{か}わったのや、[明]{あか}るい[人]{ひと}になったのは、[全部彼]{ぜんぶかれ}のおかげなんだ!」 is grammatical and even sounds fairly natural. The only part that does not quite sound natural is 「明るい人」. We would rarely use 「人」 that way to refer to oneself, but again, it is still all grammatical. You could say 「明るくなった」. Am I using the right particles? Yes, you ...


4

You probably heard ってば, which is a contraction of と言えば. From 大辞林: てば (「と言えば」の転。[...] 「ん」で終わる語に付く場合以外は、すべて「ってば」の形をとる) 一 [...] 二 (終助) 文末にあって種々の語に付く。じれったい気持ちをこめて、呼びかけるのに用いる。「お母さん、はやくっ—」「はやく来ないと、行列が過ぎちゃうっ—」 The keywords here are じれったい (impatient) and 呼びかける (call out to so.). The nuance of trying to "convince the listener of something" only ...


2

AはBのことだ is "A means B". Aというの is "what's called A". So, 「関東地方」というのは東京のことですか is "Does what's called Kanto Region mean Tokyo?". (Incidentally, the answer is no) 「関東地方」というのは東京ということですか can mean the same thing as …東京のこと… but that という(こと) is more likely to denote a clause. It sounds like 東京(にいる)ということ or "By saying 'Kanto Region', do you mean you've been to ...


0

The last example, at least, is very bulky and most people would not bother saying "という" twice as it is redundant. The other two seem fine to me.The second is a bit more concise. I do not see any great difference. If I were to translate, 1 is By Kanto, are you talking about Tokyo? 2. is roughly By Kanto, do you mean Tokyo? 3. is roughly By Kanto, do you mean ...


1

When talking casually, 私も is extremely common and, depending on the situation, often means "me too". I would like to see the full post you mentioned, but I'd guess that whoever wrote 私もです was just finding a polite way to say 私も. Either way, 私もですis not wrong.


2

The second が in the snippet 岐阜県警が捜索したが見つからず is not the subject marker, but the conjunction particle が (which you could replace by け(れ)ど(も)) translating to "but": 岐阜県警が捜索したが見つからず Gifu Police searched [for the missing person], but not finding [him, had to call off the search the same evening...] I don't understand your "sentence segment", so I can't ...


2

Part 1 Let's start with the verb "to go", 行く. Here is a perfectly valid sentence: 行く。 What does it mean? Well, this verb can take some arguments, such as the actor: who is going; (required) the destination: where they are going; (optional) You may have noticed that no actor was listed in the sentence, despite me claiming it is "required". It ...


4

「いつか日本に行きます。」 sounds the most natural. You could insert a comma if you like to put in a pause:「いつか、日本に行きます。」 and it will be equally correct grammar. Japanese does not usually need or use a pronoun; rather, the pronoun is, in most cases, implied. If you do not include 「私は」, it is clear to the listener that you must be talking about yourself since you did ...



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