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8

As I wrote in reply to kingyo's question:  どこだ + のだ = どこなのだ That is, な is the 連体形 of だ used before the formal noun / nominalizer の. In this case, だ is simply not possible: *何を言っているだ Generally speaking, you can't follow a verb with だ like this. And so the longer sentence: *何を言っているなのか分からない is ungrammatical for the same reason. Since it's ...


7

These are called "sentence-final particles", or [終助詞]{しゅう・じょ・し}. There are many particles that can be used in this way; probably more than is acceptable for the scope of questions on this site. But some common ones are ね ("agreement"), か (question marker), わ (see this post), and な (prohibition).


6

「[端]{はし}の[町]{まち}」 means "a town at the end (of something)", which is probably not what you are looking for. 「町の端」 means "one end of a town", which is the meaning I suppose you would want. The 「の」 does not look good in a name, so you might just drop it and use a 「町端」, which might actually exist as a family name. It would probably be read まちはた instead of ...


4

There are several issues with the translation you're suggesting there. Let's start with the English sentence: I am going to sleep tomorrow. The way you've parsed it to translate "going to" is taken to mean the motion verb "to go". But is sleep a place that you are going to? Unless, this is some really poetic English, I think less colloquially what ...


4

「[余裕]{よゆう}を[見]{み}せていられるのも、いまの[内]{うち}だ。」 The 「の」 is a nominalizing particle. It enables the verb phrase 「見せていられる」 to function as a noun. The 「も」 is kind of like "also" but not quite in that it only hints at a possibility that there might be another thing that the speaker thinks applies besides 余裕を見せていられること. 「"Verb phrase in potential" + の + も + ...


3

「し」 is the [連体形]{れんたいけい} (= attributive form) of the Clasical auxiliary verb 「き」, which expresses "past tense". As in your examples, it is sometimes used in the Modern context when the author wants it to sound "literary" and/or "dramatic". Today, it is used almost exclusively in fiction. 「[背負]{せお}いし[者]{もの}」=「背負った者」 「かつて[来]{き}たりし者」=「かつて来た者」 ...


1

Your translation looks OK. "there's been some vagueness as to whether person A and B's relationship is romantic or not..." Even though Person B's line is only 「ああ・・」, I would think he is a man. A woman would rarely, if ever, say that as a reply to a statement. "so for a moment I wavered on whether the sentence meant marriage or all romantic matters ...


1

As is mentioned above, sentence-final particles are the ones that connect to predicates or other sentence-final particles. The ones that connect to other grammatical elements such as nouns or adverbs are called "interjection particles". Interjection particles can also appear at the end of a sentence when the sentence is inverted or incomplete. But they ...



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