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6

Yes, the sentence is perfectly correct. The auxiliary (助動詞) 「れる/られる」 has four meanings: 「受け身」(passive), 「尊敬」(honorific), 「可能」(potential), and 「自発」(spontaneous). Here in your example, it is used as honorific. 総理大臣はヨーロッパを訪問されたくさんの国々の大統領に会われた。 is not the passive voice, but the honorific speech (尊敬語) of: 総理大臣はヨーロッパを訪問したくさんの国々の大統領に会った。 Which ...


4

忘れないで here is the casual form of 忘れないでください, which means "don't forget". In general, when it's not the last word in the sentence it means "without forgetting". As you guessed, it's basically one of two て forms for negative verbs. The other is 忘れなくて, but it's used in different contexts like 忘れなくてもいいです, "it's alright if you forget".


3

This is a simple and casual question, but it doesn't mean the answer would be likewise. Sometimes a very basic notion in a language turns out to be completely absent in another. One of my favorite examples is "Framing a question whose answer is an ordinal number" on English.SE. So, conclusion first, if you ask this to native speakers, I'm afraid answers ...


2

If you say「私の努力」it follows that you would use は. By saying 「私の努力」rather than just「努力」, the sentence already begins by singling the speaker out, so I think は would most naturally follow. If you drop the「私の」you could naturally use は or が depending on the context. Like... Your boss comes over to your desk to discuss a project that your team has been ...


2

I think you are a bit confused about the nature of each of the particles you are discussing. は can be called the "topic marker", and is the particle that introduces (or marks) the topic being discussed. Many times this corresponds to what in English is called the "subject", although this is not always true (since I want to keep the discussion as basic as ...


2

”で” Here is the te-form of the coupla "だ/です" and means simply "is", but it has the connotation of continuing on with the sentence, instead of ending it like "だ" would. So "AはBで。。。" would mean "A is B and..."


2

Some context would be helpful as it seems a very colloquial expression. Anyway I believe that のみ here refers to the student (since it always follows what it refers to) and I would translate "...but only high school student(s?) have no luck". Splitting it a bit more, it makes me feel of something along the line of "(the fact of) having no luck is restricted ...


2

It's OK to have two or more が/は in one sentence, and this typically happens when a relative clause is involved, like in this case. (I think you know the basics of relative clauses, but here's a good starter: Relative Clauses and Sentence Order) 私は魚が好きな人が好きじゃない。 私は魚好きな人が好きじゃない。 私は魚好きな人好きじゃない。 These all make sense, and carry the same meaning. ...


1

In subordinate clauses like these, ONLY が can be replaced by の (and only when the verb follows immediately after, to prevent confusion with the other Noun+の+Noun meaning). を, で, and other particles cannot be replaced by の in subordinate clauses. For example: ○ 私が作った料理 → 私の作った料理 ○ 木村が買った本 → 木村の買った本 The phrase「絵の描くのは」is valid if the picture is the ...


1

This is a very subjective answer but, there is no "quick fix" for particles, as there are many exceptions, special cases, etc. Mastery takes a long time, even if you focus on it. Consider prepositions in English, which fulfill a similar role. Why do we play "on" a tennis court, "at" a park, and "in" a sand box? It feels easy to a native speaker, but it ...


1

By saying もまた (=also), the lyrics imply such a way of living (ie. "でこぼこ道や 曲がりくねった道 地図さえない") is not the only way of human life. If you said それが人生 ("That is life") here, it would mean everyone lives a life with many ups and downs. It would be perfectly fine in the lyrics of other songs. However, the person in this song is not talking about people's life in ...


1

If you do a very direct translation... きむらさんは・さくらだいがくの・がくせい・です。 as for Kimura-san / Sakura University's / student / (he) is きむらさんの・せんこうは・にほんご・です。 as for Kimura-san's major / Japanese Language / (it) is 「は」takes priority over「の」in the second example. I think you are correct in parsing the first example's usage of「さくらだいがくのがくせい」as "Sakura ...


1

As mentioned in l'électeurさん’s answer, the word 果物 needs to be followed by では or something like that in order to mean what you really mean. 「私は果物、いちごやメロンが好きです。」 sounds like a cute imaginary character in a kids’ TV show saying “I am fruit, I like strawberries and melons.” Those example sentences above would sound more natural in these ways. (1)「果物では、...


1

Both nouns(名詞) and na-adjectives(形容動詞) have the same continuative-form(連用形) which is the form you use in a sentence to keep it going, and consist in appending で to them at the end. 彼女 は 静かで 18歳で 美人です 。 かのじょ は しずかで 18さいで びじんです。 She's quiet, 18 years old and a beauty. In the example above we chained a na-adjectve followed by a noun(years) – ...



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