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6

は and を can be interchangeable when it is put after object, but there are some exceptions. The most typical usage of を indicate the word is object. すしを食べません。 means 私はすしを食べません。 which can be translated as "I don't eat sushi." And the most typical usage of は is to indicate the word is subject. 私はすしを食べません。 means I don't eat sushi. は also can be used to ...


4

The ~どころではない idiom you mentioned is irrelevant here. 役どころ is a noun phrase which means role. This どころ is a sort of suffix which means part, place or something like that. Some examples: 寄りどころ the thing one mentally relies on 頑張りどころ the difficult part one has to work hard 勘どころ knack, key


3

Don't treat 「とは」 as a single unit. 「〜と違う」 means "different from". This 「と」 is the one normally glossed as "with", although I can't think of a way to use that gloss here. When 「〜と違う」 is used in the outermost layer of the sentence, it is normally becomes 「〜とは違う」. While I can't give a technical explanation of why this is the case, I'd say the hand-wavey one ...


3

The particle は is primarily used to define the subject, and in that use, you are right that it is very common to omit the subject in the following sentence if it is the same. It's not wrong to repeat the subject (eg. 僕は) explicitly, for example if a sentence is long, if there is room for confusion, or if you want to place emphasis on the subject.


3

抜き is also an option for 'without': チーズ抜きピザ


3

Pizza without cheese : チーズ無しピザを下さい Shoyu Ramen without garlic 醤油ラーメンニンニク抜き With cheese チーズ付き Curry with Tomato トマト入りカレーを下さい You don't ask for sugar in your coffee since you have to pour it yourself in most coffee shop.


2

I can't say assertively without seeing the context, but your interpretation of (1) seems wrong. "取り入れた外気は血液に" is missing a verb. You are right. But what's missing here is, I guess, "送られる," "流れ込む," "吸収される,"or something. If so, this sentence is explaining how human body takes oxygen from the air into the blood. Why do they omit verbs once in a while? One ...


2

I will try to answer your question but it is quite a broad subject. I will start on the choice of the verb. I guess your confusion comes from the fact that both may have been introduced as meaning "am/are/is" います is a verb meaning "to be", but only in the sense that a living person is in a place i.e. この所{ところ}で人{ひと}が二人{ふたり}います。 translates to There are two ...


2

控える is special. It can be used both an intransitively as well as a transitively. 広がる, on the other hand, is just intranstive. Thus 山を背後に広がっている doesn't work.※ を can be used with otherwise intransitive verbs of motion. See for example this answer: Making sense of transitive usage of 行く and 来る - 「を行く」 and 「を来る」 As for 控える: It comes with few different ...


2

Here, とは is just pointing out that we're defining a characteristic of the N700 group. (The と is the quotative particle, but I don't think that really helps in parsing this.) どこが違う? is not asking for a definition per se, but for defining a characteristic. Your translation is pretty close. Literally, I'd translate it as something like: Where is the ...


2

「オレ[憎]{にく}たらしさには [自身]{じしん}があったが あいつだけはぜったい[勝]{か}てん。」 First off, this sentence is highly colloquial and the speaker omits a couple of particles. That may be causing part of your confusion. The conjunction 「が」 in the middle is actually a key word here that would help one understand the last half of the sentence. "I had confidence in my own 憎たらしさ, but ...


2

「カンニングをしているところを [見]{み}つかる。」= "I am found cheating (on the test)." This sentence is 100% grammatical. If you analyzed it using the grammar of another language, however, it might look as though it were ungrammatical. 「見つかる」 , as you stated, is an intransitive verb, but it happens to fall into a group of intransitive verbs that hold the ...


2

I will preface this answer by saying there is no hard-and-fast rule, like with most particles, about when to use と and when to use こと. So, I'll try to stick directly to the context you provided. と The particle と is used in quite a few ways, but in this particular case (haha, get it?) it's a quoting particle. 明日{あした}も雨{あめ}です。 It will rain tomorrow, ...


1

Your translation shows your complete understanding of the phrase even if you do not like it yourself. A difficulty this relative clause could present for the translator is the fact that 「霞む」 is an intransitive verb and that is not the action either performed by or against 「打突」, the main noun of the relative clause. What I often do in such cases is that I ...


1

This isn't literal but it seems natural: 妹の誕生日に人形をあげました。


1

As @Eric mentioned, に is the correct choice, and there is no harm in having two of them in this sentence. In addition to that, you could use には to emphasize that it was specifically for her birthday instead of some other occasion. 誕生日には妹に人形をあげました。 → For her birthday, I gave my little sister a doll. Note that you can also use [贈]{おく}る for giving a ...


1

There is no problem having two に particles in one sentence. Your original choice is most correct. Using [event]+に is the best way to express that something will happen for [event], and [person]+にあげる happens to also be the best way to express that you are giving something to [person]. 誕生日{たんじょうび}に妹{いもうと}に人形{にんぎょう}をあげました。


1

Some words can be combined with の. These are called の-adjectives. Many are adverbs that become adjectives. The most common ones that can be used with の are たくさん、多い、and ほとんど. 多い is special. When used before the noun it changes to 多く Example: 1)車がたくさんあります。There are a lot of cars. 風でたくさんの木が倒れました。Due to the wind, many trees collapsed. 2)人が多いです。 ...



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