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(Here I'm trying to show why 四方を海に囲まれる is not direct passive. Please see this as an appendix to broccoliforest's answer and reply to KentaroTomono's comment.) First, OP's second sentence 四方が海に囲まれる is direct passive. Wikipedia defines「直接受身は、能動文における直接目的語または間接目的語を主語にするものである。」(source). Following this definition, a direct passive sentence is formed this ...


4

Your question actually contains multiple topics. Is 四方を海に囲まれる an indirect passive sentence? Does this type of passive allow for the を? Is 四方が海に囲まれる correct as well? Spoiler: 1.—Maybe, 2.—Yes, 3.—Yes Is 四方を海に囲まれる an indirect passive sentence? Well, it depends. Japanese passive usages can be categorized into three types. Direct ...


2

Here's the basic difference. [noun] + をする: common; means "do ~". [noun] + がする: relatively uncommon; means "there's a sense of ~", "feel ~". 勉強をする and 勉強がする 復活をする and 復活がする 勉強 here is a noun meaning 'study', and 復活 here is a noun meaning 'revival/resurrection'. So 勉強をする and 復活をする make sense, but 勉強がする/復活がする does not make sense. Examples: ...


0

勉強がする and 復活がする don't make sense. 感情がする and 感情をする themselves make little sense but for example, なつかしい感情がした can be understood as 懐かしい感情を覚えた and 複雑な感情をしたロボット as "a robot who is equipped with complex emotion".


3

My textbook has this example: 四方を海に囲まれる。 Is it the indirect passive that allows for the を direct object marker to be used in that passive voice example? The answer is no. It is the direct passive voice. The reason will be explained below. In Japanese,the passive voice takes human beings (or something which can feel emotions as the de-facto subject ...


1

Yes, the indirect passive (aka "suffering passive") allows for を to mark the object of a transitive verb. There are, in general, three basic structures to create a passive in Japanese: [subject] が [agent] に [transitive verb] [subject] が [agent] に [object] を [transitive verb] [subject] が [agent] に [intransitive verb] Number 1 is the regular passive that ...


0

This is my own subjective sense and I have no source to refer to, but I feel that oddness of structure like ◯◯を好き is stronger in this order. present indicative (very unnatural) ◯◯を好きだ! past indicative ◯◯を好きだった sentences with some modality (question / command / conjecture / indirect quote etc.) (conjecture) ◯◯を好きなのだ (indirect quote) ◯◯を好きだ…と? modifying ...


1

日本語の初心者ですが、日本語文法は何年も勉強していて、この質問に答えられると思っています。 :D I think this is fundamentally not something unique to 「好き」 and 「嫌い」. Let me start by expanding the scope of your question: the other questions you linked to explain why 「が」 can turn into 「を」 under 「〜と[certain verbs]」; they did not explain why things like 「私は太郎が猫を嫌いな理由は未だに分からない。」 are just fine. So I think ...


2

を denotes a direct object in a sentence. は denotes the subject. Here, えんぴつ is the subject of the sentence, so it should have a は next to it.


1

It is not the animacy of the object that determines the particle choice: It is the transitivity of the verb that does. 「ほんをよむ」(to read a book): 「よむ」 in this phrase is a transitive verb; therefore, 「を」 is used. 「おとこをなぐる」(to smack a dude): 「を」 is used for the same reason as above. That 「おとこ」 is animate has nothng to do with it. 「おくさんにキスする」(to ...



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