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Yes, it makes sense to talk about the transitivity of verbal noun plus する constructions. I would simply link you to the introduction of The Light Verb Construction in Japanese: The Role of the Verbal Noun, but I suppose it's better if I repeat some of the examples here. All of the following examples are taken from page 8: First, intransitive verbal noun + ...


1

(This is just a supplementary note to compliment the answer above) 向く is an interesting case (see below) but generally when an intransitive verb takes を the English equivalent often contains an additional word: You fly across the sky.-> 空を飛ぶ You run along a road-> 道を走る You stroll around a park -> 公園を散歩する You go out of a house -> 家を出る You feel sad about ...


0

Adding just a bit more to Mr. Kawaguchi's answer, I think that 家を出る is usually heard in a situation where someone (a teenager, a spouse) leaves the home where they are "supposed to be", often under not good circumstances (running away from home, domestic violence, imminent divorce, ...). C.f. 家出 In this case, the situation is about a presumably unmarried ...


5

Although it is usually the transitive verb that takes a "Noun + を" in front of it, there is an important exception to this general rule. Intransitive verbs such as 向く、[走]{はし}る (to run)、[飛]{と}ぶ (to fly)、[出]{で}る (to get out), etc. can take a "Noun + を" when it describes the place of an action or the direction of a movement. 上を向く = to look upward ...


2

上 is a noun and を is to show the process of the act. [上]{うえ}を[向]{む}いて= with [your face] looking up [at the sky]


1

Using が casts the focus onto the object. Think of it in a similar manner to using an adjective—you're describing the state of the movie by saying you find the prospect of watching it desirable. Using を instead of が focuses on the action—you're still saying that you want to see the movie, but you're emphasizing that you want to see something, as opposed to ...


3

から is really only used to designate the location/point/time from which things start, whereas を is a rather generic particle. Because of this, から makes the reader mentally picture a time range (今夜から明日にかけて雪になります), a motion (東京から大阪へは3時間かかります), a coverage (揺りかごから墓場まで), etc. In contrast, を just doesn't have this sense of motion/breadth/width. And so when this ...



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