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19

You usually can't have two をs in one clause, so when you see one, most commonly one of the following is true: It's part of a 〜を〜に(して) construction in which して is left out. AをBに → AをBに(して) You can recognize this one by the distinctive 〜を〜に pattern, often with a comma. A repeated verb has been left out ("backward gapping"): XがAを、そしてYがBを買った → ...


7

There are three particles in Japanese which are typically spelled differently than they're pronounced: は (pronounced wa rather than ha) を (pronounced o rather than wo) へ (pronounced e rather than he) Although you're hearing it correctly, in this case it is actually the particle を, marking a direct object: (わたしは)ケーキを たべたい This particle comes ...


6

「[出]{で}る」 is indeed always an intransitive verb. 「[出]{だ}す」 is the transitive verb. So, why is it possible to say 「レストランを出る」、「[日本]{にほん}を出る」, etc? It is an "exception" to the general rule that says one can only attach 「を」 to transitive verbs. The 「を」 attached to transitive verbs functions differently than the 「を」 in 「レストランを出る」. The former is the famous ...


6

A verb and symbols are omitted in this sentence. Read it like this: 「どのような状況下であっても、必ず十分な結果を(出したい)」と思い、 必死に過ごした3か月でした。


6

The part 街を人を simply isn't "the people of the city", but two parallel objects: "the city, the people (accusative)". In English you have to put a comma between them but Japanese orthography doesn't require it. Japanese commas are not for indicating grammatical structure; they basically just mark where to pause. Thus, you can't place too much confidence in ...


6

は and を can be interchangeable when it is put after object, but there are some exceptions. The most typical usage of を indicate the word is object. すしを食べません。 means 私はすしを食べません。 which can be translated as "I don't eat sushi." And the most typical usage of は is to indicate the word is subject. 私はすしを食べません。 means I don't eat sushi. は also can be used to ...


5

This is a simple case of subclauses - you've still got one を per clause: [この道を[靴を履かずに]歩けますか。] 靴 is the object of 履かず, 道 is the object* of 歩けます. *Depending on your interpretation of を with what you would think are intransitive verbs. You can read more about these sorts of cases here: It seems that 渡る is categorized as 自動詞 (intransitive verb), yet it is ...


4

That kind of を drops quite often in casual conversation; you say 文句つけるな (文句をつけるな) 文句言うな (文句を言うな) ケチつけるな(ケチをつけるな) ケーキ全部食べちゃった。(ケーキを全部食べてしまった。) うどん買っといて。(うどんを買っておいて。) 宿題やんなさい!(宿題をやりなさい。)


3

"Additionally, from this post on Japan Reference forum and examples on ALC, I gather that を前に can mean "before" both spatially and temporally. Is this correct?" Yes, it is correct. In your example sentence, however, it is strictly temporal. "If を前に does mean "before", then how does it differ from の前に? Is it a matter of one being more common in ...


2

「カンニングをしているところを [見]{み}つかる。」= "I am found cheating (on the test)." This sentence is 100% grammatical. If you analyzed it using the grammar of another language, however, it might look as though it were ungrammatical. 「見つかる」 , as you stated, is an intransitive verb, but it happens to fall into a group of intransitive verbs that hold the ...


2

I think the reason here is that those two を apply to two different verbs. この道を[靴を履かずに]歩けますか。


2

This sense of を is similar to "from", like から - I'm not quite sure the difference in nuance between the two though. And this を is used with intransitive verbs. For reference, sense 6 of を entry in Progressive says 「動作の起点を表す」 (indicates the starting point of an action). It gives two example sentences 8時にホテルを出た He left the hotel at eight. ...


2

It is hard to think of an example where I would expect 思う to take an object, other than when thinking about something e.g. 母のことを思う. I wonder if the を here is the object of 育てる rather than 思う. It would help you if you could somehow forget the notion "思う = 'to think'" for a moment. I could be wrong but I feel that might be what is preventing you ...


2

This is the so-called "adversarial passive". I give a detailed explanation of passives (including the "adversarial" ones) here: 「を」 object marker in this 受身形{うけみけい} sentence In your case: ⇓Active Sentence: 他の人が       (私の)手紙を 見た  ⇓ ⇓Passive Sentence:  (私が) 他の人に     手紙を 見られた⇓ That is to say, 「私の」 gets lifted to 「私が」, and 「他の人が」 gets lifted to ...


1

From my understanding because 日記 and 部屋 are marked with を it adds the implication that the subject/topic of the sentence (僕) is the owner of the 日記 and 部屋 since he was affected by his little sister acting out the verb. Is this correct? Yes. But maybe your understanding about why it works in that way is not enough correct. 僕は in your example #1 and #2 is ...


1

Either 日記が妹に読まれた or 僕は妹に日記が読まれた sound a slip up of …日記を…, otherwise they sound unnatural. (People won't find it so much odd as a slip up.) The structure itself can be used in other examples like この国では日記が多くの人に読まれている, but that specific example is not natural. You wrote "it implies that a person (subject marked with は) was affected", but that doesn't ...


1

A classic example of unfinished sentences in Japanese. You can make better sense with some brackets: 「 どのような状況下であっても必ず十分な結果を 」 と思い必死に過ごした3か月でした。 Can be translated something like: It was frantic 3 months I spent to get the result, thinking "No matter what the cirsumstances are, I will..."


1

“を” is used as “from” only when used with a verb meaning “get out”. Usually “から” is used for “from”. Where both can be used, the meanings are different. ⚪︎ 家{いえ}を出{で}る Get out of home to go somewhere (eg. shopping). ⚪︎ 家から出る Get out of house (not necessarily to go somewhere; eg. to clean your garden). ⚪︎ バスを降りる Get off the bus because you ...



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