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12

Most of this answer is basically subjective, but there's a lot going on in this question that I think should be addressed. The tldr version: Yes, を is frequently used in "real" Japanese. But if I may offer my 2 cents.. Be careful not to get ahead of yourself in your assumptions about what is and isn't "real" Japanese. Sure, 私は is often dropped, but only ...


7

ご存じです is an irregular honorific form of the verb 知る. It functions exactly the same with respect to subjects, objects and so on. More than that, there is a regular honorific form of verbs お+Vi+です (Vi is a -ます stem). For example, お聞きです from the verb 聞く. It also has an internal form noun+copula, but functions as a verb. It seems like any predicate, be it ...


7

I feel like this has been asked before, but I can't find it if it has. You've got it spot on with と being the quotation marker; that is Xと言う means that X was literally (more or less) what was said. Using を is more about the meaning/gist/essence of what is said. Here's a pair that I always remember to help distinguish them. なにを言ってるのか? → "What are ...


7

I posed this question to a native Japanese speaker. Her response was that even though to an English speaker the を in ボールを投げる and the を in 道を歩く may seem different, to a Japanese speaker they are exactly the same. In both cases, を marks the direct object, not in some vague grammatical sense of the term, but in the very tangible sense that the ...


5

Most definitely they do! (this pdf - http://lingdy.aacore.jp/jp/material/An_introduction_to_Ryukyuan_languages.pdf - is what I'm using as my source, it might be very helpful to you (^_^) ) Most of Ryuukyuuan uses =ja as a topic marker (though with some contextual variation in some languages). South Ryuukyuuan outside of Yaeyama uses =u for object marking ...


5

Although it is usually the transitive verb that takes a "Noun + を" in front of it, there is an important exception to this general rule. Intransitive verbs such as 向く、[走]{はし}る (to run)、[飛]{と}ぶ (to fly)、[出]{で}る (to get out), etc. can take a "Noun + を" when it describes the place of an action or the direction of a movement. 上を向く = to look upward ...


5

I have lived in Japan for 5 years and speak Japanese quite fluently. Yes, を is very frequently used in Japanese. It's not only used for cake eating. ;) While a native probably wouldn't say "私はケーキを食べます。", I wouldn't call it "not good form." In everyday speech, a lot of particles are dropped. I don't think を is an underused particle, especially in written ...


5

It depends not only on the verb, but on the form of the verb. The general rule is that static verbs and adjectives take "ga" and "action verbs" take "o" on the direct object. piano-o hiku play the piano piano-ga hikeru can play the piano Here, playing the piano is an action, thus "o" is used. Being able to play the piano is a state, thus "ga" ...


4

This is one of those instances where we as English speakers encounter a term and assume that it matches its English equivalent perfectly, but actually the distinction between transitive and intransitive verbs is a little bit fuzzier than you may have been led to believe. As such this answer may not be very intuitive. The basic point is that taking a direct ...


4

Yes, it makes sense to talk about the transitivity of verbal noun plus する constructions. I would simply link you to the introduction of The Light Verb Construction in Japanese: The Role of the Verbal Noun, but I suppose it's better if I repeat some of the examples here. All of the following examples are taken from page 8: First, intransitive verbal noun + ...


3

から is really only used to designate the location/point/time from which things start, whereas を is a rather generic particle. Because of this, から makes the reader mentally picture a time range (今夜から明日にかけて雪になります), a motion (東京から大阪へは3時間かかります), a coverage (揺りかごから墓場まで), etc. In contrast, を just doesn't have this sense of motion/breadth/width. And so when this ...


3

This is not as much of a newbie question as you might think. dainichi gave a good general rule-of-thumb, but at the risk of confusing you, I'd like to point out that there are many cases when を and が are actually interchangeable. For example, the sentence "I can play the piano" can be written either ピアノが弾【ひ】ける piano ga hikeru or ピアノを弾【ひ】ける ...


3

First, I agree with the answer given by ThisSuitIsBlackNot in that people do not distinguish between the two uses of を. Now back to the original question: Is it possible to create such a construction? No. 道を走る is OK. 人を走らせる is OK. 人を道を走らせる is not OK, because it is not clear who is being compelled to run. Both 人に道を走らせる and 道で人を走らせる make sense though. ...


2

Leaving を out when it is called for is possible in very informal conversations, but I would say you are better off leaving it in. Nobody will think you are speaking too formally for using it, and developing the habit of using it correctly will pay off when you are in more formal situations. For example, when writing an e-mail to a friend I would not leave it ...


1

(This is just a supplementary note to compliment the answer above) 向く is an interesting case (see below) but generally when an intransitive verb takes を the English equivalent often contains an additional word: You fly across the sky.-> 空を飛ぶ You run along a road-> 道を走る You stroll around a park -> 公園を散歩する You go out of a house -> 家を出る You feel sad about ...


1

Using が casts the focus onto the object. Think of it in a similar manner to using an adjective—you're describing the state of the movie by saying you find the prospect of watching it desirable. Using を instead of が focuses on the action—you're still saying that you want to see the movie, but you're emphasizing that you want to see something, as opposed to ...


1

First, が is a subject marker, を is an object marker. One cannot replace one with the other but, if you changed the tense from active to passive, the particle used would appear to change from を to が  ie from your first example to ご飯がたべられました. (Although it does not feel very common way to describe dinner.) Actually I would say that the first sentence is not ...


1

You are correct that 渡る is intransitive, 渡す is transitive but it seems you are not familiar with the different uses of the particle を: In addition to being a direct object marker for "handing over things": 拳銃を渡す −hand over a gun The particle を can also act as a "spatial object marker" for the intransitive forms such as crossing things like bridges: 橋を渡る ...


1

I believe that you cannot put two を since it marks a direct object. If I am correct, you would use this if the classmate can see something 「それをクラスメイトに見られて以降」. If you use を after classmate, I'm pretty sure it means that the classmate is the one being observed and most likely would be written as 「そのクラスメイトを見られて以降」. But I believe that you would want to use ...



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