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19

You usually can't have two をs in one clause, so when you see one, most commonly one of the following is true: It's part of a 〜を〜に(して) construction in which して is left out. AをBに → AをBに(して) You can recognize this one by the distinctive 〜を〜に pattern, often with a comma. A repeated verb has been left out ("backward gapping"): XがAを、そしてYがBを買った → ...


7

Although it is usually the transitive verb that takes a "Noun + を" in front of it, there is an important exception to this general rule. Intransitive verbs such as 向く、[走]{はし}る (to run)、[飛]{と}ぶ (to fly)、[出]{で}る (to get out), etc. can take a "Noun + を" when it describes the place of an action or the direction of a movement. 上を向く = to look upward ...


7

There are three particles in Japanese which are typically spelled differently than they're pronounced: は (pronounced wa rather than ha) を (pronounced o rather than wo) へ (pronounced e rather than he) Although you're hearing it correctly, in this case it is actually the particle を, marking a direct object: (わたしは)ケーキを たべたい This particle comes ...


6

A verb and symbols are omitted in this sentence. Read it like this: 「どのような状況下であっても、必ず十分な結果を(出したい)」と思い、 必死に過ごした3か月でした。


6

「[出]{で}る」 is indeed always an intransitive verb. 「[出]{だ}す」 is the transitive verb. So, why is it possible to say 「レストランを出る」、「[日本]{にほん}を出る」, etc? It is an "exception" to the general rule that says one can only attach 「を」 to transitive verbs. The 「を」 attached to transitive verbs functions differently than the 「を」 in 「レストランを出る」. The former is the famous ...


6

は and を can be interchangeable when it is put after object, but there are some exceptions. The most typical usage of を indicate the word is object. すしを食べません。 means 私はすしを食べません。 which can be translated as "I don't eat sushi." And the most typical usage of は is to indicate the word is subject. 私はすしを食べません。 means I don't eat sushi. は also can be used to ...


5

This is a simple case of subclauses - you've still got one を per clause: [この道を[靴を履かずに]歩けますか。] 靴 is the object of 履かず, 道 is the object* of 歩けます. *Depending on your interpretation of を with what you would think are intransitive verbs. You can read more about these sorts of cases here: It seems that 渡る is categorized as 自動詞 (intransitive verb), yet it is ...


4

I disagree with Kaji's analysis. While Kaji's is the textbook answer concerning the question when -wa is used, the explanation remains opaque. Rather there is a -wa after momo in the first example, because we can assume that the speaker has, at some time, seen big peaches. The one referred to in the sentence, however, is, among those seen, the biggest. That ...


4

Yes, it makes sense to talk about the transitivity of verbal noun plus する constructions. I would simply link you to the introduction of The Light Verb Construction in Japanese: The Role of the Verbal Noun, but I suppose it's better if I repeat some of the examples here. All of the following examples are taken from page 8: First, intransitive verbal noun + ...


4

1: It's better to use を I think. Reason: If you say アレックスは削除してもよろしいですか, people will think there are other things/persons that supposed to be removed sometime. In other words, は is just not natural. 2: スタート is correct to use in this circumstance. Reason: スタート is widely used especially in games and competitions.


3

If you simply say "I have never heard that song before", the natural one is その歌は聞いたことがない or その歌を聞いたことはない. Since その歌を聞いたことがない appearantly lacks the topic part, it can be correct only when it's (1) inversion of 聞いたことがないのはその歌だ (it's that song that I haven't heard) or (2) a part of coherent sentences like 「その歌を聞いたことがない。それで…」 (interchangeable to その歌を聞いたことがないので) ...


3

"Additionally, from this post on Japan Reference forum and examples on ALC, I gather that を前に can mean "before" both spatially and temporally. Is this correct?" Yes, it is correct. In your example sentence, however, it is strictly temporal. "If を前に does mean "before", then how does it differ from の前に? Is it a matter of one being more common in ...


3

上 is a noun and を is to show the process of the act. [上]{うえ}を[向]{む}いて= with [your face] looking up [at the sky]


2

Using が casts the focus onto the object. Think of it in a similar manner to using an adjective—you're describing the state of the movie by saying you find the prospect of watching it desirable. Using を instead of が focuses on the action—you're still saying that you want to see the movie, but you're emphasizing that you want to see something, as opposed to ...


2

This is the so-called "adversarial passive". I give a detailed explanation of passives (including the "adversarial" ones) here: 「を」 object marker in this 受身形{うけみけい} sentence In your case: ⇓Active Sentence: 他の人が       (私の)手紙を 見た  ⇓ ⇓Passive Sentence:  (私が) 他の人に     手紙を 見られた⇓ That is to say, 「私の」 gets lifted to 「私が」, and 「他の人が」 gets lifted to ...


2

I think the reason here is that those two を apply to two different verbs. この道を[靴を履かずに]歩けますか。


2

This sense of を is similar to "from", like から - I'm not quite sure the difference in nuance between the two though. And this を is used with intransitive verbs. For reference, sense 6 of を entry in Progressive says 「動作の起点を表す」 (indicates the starting point of an action). It gives two example sentences 8時にホテルを出た He left the hotel at eight. ...


2

「カンニングをしているところを [見]{み}つかる。」= "I am found cheating (on the test)." This sentence is 100% grammatical. If you analyzed it using the grammar of another language, however, it might look as though it were ungrammatical. 「見つかる」 , as you stated, is an intransitive verb, but it happens to fall into a group of intransitive verbs that hold the ...


1

From my understanding because 日記 and 部屋 are marked with を it adds the implication that the subject/topic of the sentence (僕) is the owner of the 日記 and 部屋 since he was affected by his little sister acting out the verb. Is this correct? Yes. But maybe your understanding about why it works in that way is not enough correct. 僕は in your example #1 and #2 is ...


1

Either 日記が妹に読まれた or 僕は妹に日記が読まれた sound a slip up of …日記を…, otherwise they sound unnatural. (People won't find it so much odd as a slip up.) The structure itself can be used in other examples like この国では日記が多くの人に読まれている, but that specific example is not natural. You wrote "it implies that a person (subject marked with は) was affected", but that doesn't ...


1

A classic example of unfinished sentences in Japanese. You can make better sense with some brackets: 「 どのような状況下であっても必ず十分な結果を 」 と思い必死に過ごした3か月でした。 Can be translated something like: It was frantic 3 months I spent to get the result, thinking "No matter what the cirsumstances are, I will..."


1

“を” is used as “from” only when used with a verb meaning “get out”. Usually “から” is used for “from”. Where both can be used, the meanings are different. ⚪︎ 家{いえ}を出{で}る Get out of home to go somewhere (eg. shopping). ⚪︎ 家から出る Get out of house (not necessarily to go somewhere; eg. to clean your garden). ⚪︎ バスを降りる Get off the bus because you ...


1

Combining Thomas's answer with Marcus's comment on the question, I think I've got it, but neither response is really complete on its own. I'd like to position the answer in the way that I'm thinking about it, so that I can (1) make sure this is correct, and (2) help those who might think like me. It's all about whether the noun feels like a direct object ...


1

Both versions are acceptable. The choice of particle shifts the emphasis slightly. こんなに大きなももはみたことがない。 In both cases, こと is added after the verb to turn it into a noun meaning "the experience of having done X". In this case みたこと is treated as a property of the peach. Thus it stresses the action of seeing over the object of the peach. Compare with ...


1

(This is just a supplementary note to compliment the answer above) 向く is an interesting case (see below) but generally when an intransitive verb takes を the English equivalent often contains an additional word: You fly across the sky.-> 空を飛ぶ You run along a road-> 道を走る You stroll around a park -> 公園を散歩する You go out of a house -> 家を出る You feel sad about ...



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