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7

は and を can be interchangeable when it is put after object, but there are some exceptions. The most typical usage of を indicate the word is object. すしを食べません。 means 私はすしを食べません。 which can be translated as "I don't eat sushi." And the most typical usage of は is to indicate the word is subject. 私はすしを食べません。 means I don't eat sushi. は also can be used to ...


6

A verb and symbols are omitted in this sentence. Read it like this: 「どのような状況下であっても、必ず十分な結果を(出したい)」と思い、 必死に過ごした3か月でした。


6

「[出]{で}る」 is indeed always an intransitive verb. 「[出]{だ}す」 is the transitive verb. So, why is it possible to say 「レストランを出る」、「[日本]{にほん}を出る」, etc? It is an "exception" to the general rule that says one can only attach 「を」 to transitive verbs. The 「を」 attached to transitive verbs functions differently than the 「を」 in 「レストランを出る」. The former is the famous ...


6

The part 街を人を simply isn't "the people of the city", but two parallel objects: "the city, the people (accusative)". In English you have to put a comma between them but Japanese orthography doesn't require it. Japanese commas are not for indicating grammatical structure; they basically just mark where to pause. Thus, you can't place too much confidence in ...


6

(Here I'm trying to show why 四方を海に囲まれる is not direct passive. Please see this as an appendix to broccoliforest's answer and reply to KentaroTomono's comment.) First, OP's second sentence 四方が海に囲まれる is direct passive. Wikipedia defines「直接受身は、能動文における直接目的語または間接目的語を主語にするものである。」(source). Following this definition, a direct passive sentence is formed this ...


5

Your question actually contains multiple topics. Is 四方を海に囲まれる an indirect passive sentence? Does this type of passive allow for the を? Is 四方が海に囲まれる correct as well? Spoiler: 1.—Maybe, 2.—Yes, 3.—Yes Is 四方を海に囲まれる an indirect passive sentence? Well, it depends. Japanese passive usages can be categorized into three types. Direct ...


5

This is a simple case of subclauses - you've still got one を per clause: [この道を[靴を履かずに]歩けますか。] 靴 is the object of 履かず, 道 is the object* of 歩けます. *Depending on your interpretation of を with what you would think are intransitive verbs. You can read more about these sorts of cases here: It seems that 渡る is categorized as 自動詞 (intransitive verb), yet it is ...


4

The difference is that "suki" is an adjectival-noun (the set of nouns which are closer in meaning to our adjectives, but function grammatically more like nouns). It stands in place of the English "to like", which is a verb -- hence the confusion. If it helps, try thinking about "suki" as meaning "an enjoyable-to-Subject thing" rather than "I like [x]".


4

That kind of を drops quite often in casual conversation; you say 文句つけるな (文句をつけるな) 文句言うな (文句を言うな) ケチつけるな(ケチをつけるな) ケーキ全部食べちゃった。(ケーキを全部食べてしまった。) うどん買っといて。(うどんを買っておいて。) 宿題やんなさい!(宿題をやりなさい。)


3

I don't know wether this is grammatically correct or not, but I would never say it, but I think : 日本語を好きになる Sounds very natural, even though it doesn't really mean : 日本語が好きだ


3

My textbook has this example: 四方を海に囲まれる。 Is it the indirect passive that allows for the を direct object marker to be used in that passive voice example? The answer is no. It is the direct passive voice. The reason will be explained below. In Japanese,the passive voice takes human beings (or something which can feel emotions as the de-facto subject ...


3

漢字が持つ is a relative clause. It has a gap in object position: 漢字-が __-を 持つ The gap is filled semantically by the following noun phrase 体系的なつながり: ① ​  漢字-が 体系的なつながり-を 持つ   ② [ 漢字-が ________-を 持つ ] 体系的なつながり These can be translated into English: ① Kanji have a systematic relationship. ② the systematic relationship [ which kanji have __ ] ...


3

"Additionally, from this post on Japan Reference forum and examples on ALC, I gather that を前に can mean "before" both spatially and temporally. Is this correct?" Yes, it is correct. In your example sentence, however, it is strictly temporal. "If を前に does mean "before", then how does it differ from の前に? Is it a matter of one being more common in ...


2

彼の情熱的な抱擁で彼女は息がつけなかった。 Why is 息 marked here as the object (assuming が is used here as an object marker)? It's because of the potential form つける. The つける(吐ける) is the potential(可能形) form of the transitive verb つく(吐く). For example: 「英語を話す」--> 「英語を話せる」「英語が話せる」「英語が話せない」 「目を離す」--> 「目を離せない」「目が離せない」 「単位を取る」--> 「単位を取れない」「単位が取れる」「単位が取れない」 「論文を書く」--> ...


2

On the one hand, を in this case indicates the direct object. You are talking Japanese. On the other hand で indicates the means by which you accomplish the action. You are talking in Japanese, or talking using Japanese. Note that both sentences could be extended : 電話で日本語を話す : I talk Japanese on the phone (using the phone). 日本語で起{お}こった事{こと}を話す : I talk in ...


2

It is hard to think of an example where I would expect 思う to take an object, other than when thinking about something e.g. 母のことを思う. I wonder if the を here is the object of 育てる rather than 思う. It would help you if you could somehow forget the notion "思う = 'to think'" for a moment. I could be wrong but I feel that might be what is preventing you ...


2

I think the reason here is that those two を apply to two different verbs. この道を[靴を履かずに]歩けますか。


2

This sense of を is similar to "from", like から - I'm not quite sure the difference in nuance between the two though. And this を is used with intransitive verbs. For reference, sense 6 of を entry in Progressive says 「動作の起点を表す」 (indicates the starting point of an action). It gives two example sentences 8時にホテルを出た He left the hotel at eight. ...


2

This is the so-called "adversarial passive". I give a detailed explanation of passives (including the "adversarial" ones) here: 「を」 object marker in this 受身形{うけみけい} sentence In your case: ⇓Active Sentence: 他の人が       (私の)手紙を 見た  ⇓ ⇓Passive Sentence:  (私が) 他の人に     手紙を 見られた⇓ That is to say, 「私の」 gets lifted to 「私が」, and 「他の人が」 gets lifted to ...


2

「カンニングをしているところを [見]{み}つかる。」= "I am found cheating (on the test)." This sentence is 100% grammatical. If you analyzed it using the grammar of another language, however, it might look as though it were ungrammatical. 「見つかる」 , as you stated, is an intransitive verb, but it happens to fall into a group of intransitive verbs that hold the ...


2

を denotes a direct object in a sentence. は denotes the subject. Here, えんぴつ is the subject of the sentence, so it should have a は next to it.


2

Here's the basic difference. [noun] + をする: common; means "do ~". [noun] + がする: relatively uncommon; means "there's a sense of ~", "feel ~". 勉強をする and 勉強がする 復活をする and 復活がする 勉強 here is a noun meaning 'study', and 復活 here is a noun meaning 'revival/resurrection'. So 勉強をする and 復活をする make sense, but 勉強がする/復活がする does not make sense. Examples: ...


1

Yes, the indirect passive (aka "suffering passive") allows for を to mark the object of a transitive verb. There are, in general, three basic structures to create a passive in Japanese: [subject] が [agent] に [transitive verb] [subject] が [agent] に [object] を [transitive verb] [subject] が [agent] に [intransitive verb] Number 1 is the regular passive that ...


1

日本語の初心者ですが、日本語文法は何年も勉強していて、この質問に答えられると思っています。 :D I think this is fundamentally not something unique to 「好き」 and 「嫌い」. Let me start by expanding the scope of your question: the other questions you linked to explain why 「が」 can turn into 「を」 under 「〜と[certain verbs]」; they did not explain why things like 「私は太郎が猫を嫌いな理由は未だに分からない。」 are just fine. So I think ...


1

It is not the animacy of the object that determines the particle choice: It is the transitivity of the verb that does. 「ほんをよむ」(to read a book): 「よむ」 in this phrase is a transitive verb; therefore, 「を」 is used. 「おとこをなぐる」(to smack a dude): 「を」 is used for the same reason as above. That 「おとこ」 is animate has nothng to do with it. 「おくさんにキスする」(to ...


1

From my understanding because 日記 and 部屋 are marked with を it adds the implication that the subject/topic of the sentence (僕) is the owner of the 日記 and 部屋 since he was affected by his little sister acting out the verb. Is this correct? Yes. But maybe your understanding about why it works in that way is not enough correct. 僕は in your example #1 and #2 is ...


1

Either 日記が妹に読まれた or 僕は妹に日記が読まれた sound a slip up of …日記を…, otherwise they sound unnatural. (People won't find it so much odd as a slip up.) The structure itself can be used in other examples like この国では日記が多くの人に読まれている, but that specific example is not natural. You wrote "it implies that a person (subject marked with は) was affected", but that doesn't ...


1

A classic example of unfinished sentences in Japanese. You can make better sense with some brackets: 「 どのような状況下であっても必ず十分な結果を 」 と思い必死に過ごした3か月でした。 Can be translated something like: It was frantic 3 months I spent to get the result, thinking "No matter what the cirsumstances are, I will..."


1

“を” is used as “from” only when used with a verb meaning “get out”. Usually “から” is used for “from”. Where both can be used, the meanings are different. ⚪︎ 家{いえ}を出{で}る Get out of home to go somewhere (eg. shopping). ⚪︎ 家から出る Get out of house (not necessarily to go somewhere; eg. to clean your garden). ⚪︎ バスを降りる Get off the bus because you ...



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