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16

You usually can't have two をs in one clause, so when you see one, most commonly one of the following is true: It's part of a 〜を〜に(して) construction in which して is left out. AをBに → AをBに(して) You can recognize this one by the distinctive 〜を〜に pattern, often with a comma. A repeated verb has been left out ("backward gapping"): XがAを、そしてYがBを買った → ...


12

There is a class of Japanese verbs (and more generally, predicates) whose subjects and objects take が.[1] For example: あの学生がその本が要る。(Ano gakusei ga sono hon ga iru. "That student needs your book.") 猫が魚が好きだ。(Neko ga sakana ga suki da. "Cats like fish.") 私が日本語が分かる。 (Watashi ga nihongo ga wakaru. "I understand Japanese.") (Of couse, these がs can be replaced ...


12

Most of this answer is basically subjective, but there's a lot going on in this question that I think should be addressed. The tldr version: Yes, を is frequently used in "real" Japanese. But if I may offer my 2 cents.. Be careful not to get ahead of yourself in your assumptions about what is and isn't "real" Japanese. Sure, 私は is often dropped, but only ...


11

In the が + potential construction, the focus is on the noun. 新聞が読める (what I am able to read is newspapers [as opposed to other written media]) ここで切符が買えますか (is this where tickets [as opposed to other items for sale] can be bought?) In the を + potential construction, the focus is on the entire phrase. 新聞を読める (what I am able to do is read ...


11

Think of it as through. 空をゆく 'go through the sky' ジャングルを行く 'go through a jungle' 歴史街道を行く 'go through a historic street' 一歩先を行く 'go through (a path) one step ahead' 私の道を行く 'go through my own way' 晴れの日を来る 'come through a sunny day (atmosphere)' 遠い道を来る 'come through a long road'


11

There are basically four choices with motion verbs in Japanese. Each has a slightly different implication. に - "to" indicates the final goal of the travel. If chosen in your sentence it would be slightly nonsensical due to the この "Go directly to the street right here" で - "in or around" tends to indicate meandering inside of the boundaries of a location. ...


10

Yes, it was one form. From here: 奈良時代には、「オ」は [o] 、「ヲ」は [wo] と発音されており明確な区別があった。借字(万葉仮名)では、オには意・憶・於・應(応)・隱(隠)・乙などの字が用いられる一方、「ヲ」には乎・呼・袁・遠・鳥・鳴・怨・越・少・小・尾・麻・男・緒・雄などが用いられていた Translation In the Nara period, オ was pronounced as "o" and ヲ was pronounced as "wo", and were clearly distinguished. [借字]{しゃくじ}(Manyogana) used 意・憶・於・應(応)・隱(隠)・乙, etc. for オ and ...


9

I looked the at the use of 感じる a few months ago. I came to the following conclusions: The verb is usually transitive (他動詞) ; it takes を with a noun (including embedded noun phrases with の)but It can also be intransitive (自動詞): Space ALC list it as both and give the example ~が退屈に感じる (feel bored [uninspired]) It can also take と to mark a ...


9

The two sentences are actually completely grammatically equivalent. Phrases ending in particles can be placed in an arbitrary order so long as they all precede the verb. That's because the particles indicate the function of the phrase, not the word order. For example, the following two sentences are also grammatically equivalent: 私は東京に行きます。 東京に私は行きます。 Now, ...


9

“を” is pronounced in the same way as “お,” that is, without a consonant. Therefore, if it is preceded by a mora with vowel /o/, it sounds in the same way as chōonpu “ー.” Some people pronounce “を” as /wo/, but this pronunciation is nonstandard.


8

I think you're confusing multiple をs in a sentence with multiple をs in a clause. Multiple をs in a sentence is perfectly normal: 私がご飯を作っている間、彼女はテレビを見ていた whereas multiple をs in a clause isn't: × 台風を気をつける What makes your example sentence complicated is that it's not completely clear whether there is one clause or two. In English, the word "and" is ...


8

The direct object marker を always comes straight after the direct object, not before it. You can have a place as the direct object with を (町を歩く) but here the direct object is still the chair, not the conference room. The sentence is basically このいすを運んでください, but with some extra information placed in the middle (会議室に). To my ears, the book answer sounds more ...


7

It's just an ellipsis of the verb. It happens too with other particles, for example, you have "復興へ!" (towards reconstruction!) here and there in the Tohoku area. I think that it is mostly used in an incentive context, to express "let's all…"


7

ご存じです is an irregular honorific form of the verb 知る. It functions exactly the same with respect to subjects, objects and so on. More than that, there is a regular honorific form of verbs お+Vi+です (Vi is a -ます stem). For example, お聞きです from the verb 聞く. It also has an internal form noun+copula, but functions as a verb. It seems like any predicate, be it ...


7

The answer to this is that generally speaking, you can't use を with na-adjectives. This is not standard usage for most na-adjectives. Additionally, although Google searches also attest this kind usage for 嫌い (at least), the Tanaka Corpus is known to have errors, so it's best to be careful. A google search for "を嫌い" shows that the large majority of results, ...


7

I feel like this has been asked before, but I can't find it if it has. You've got it spot on with と being the quotation marker; that is Xと言う means that X was literally (more or less) what was said. Using を is more about the meaning/gist/essence of what is said. Here's a pair that I always remember to help distinguish them. なにを言ってるのか? → "What are ...


7

There are three particles in Japanese which are typically spelled differently than they're pronounced: は (pronounced wa rather than ha) を (pronounced o rather than wo) へ (pronounced e rather than he) Although you're hearing it correctly, in this case it is actually the particle を, marking a direct object: (わたしは)ケーキを たべたい This particle comes ...


7

I posed this question to a native Japanese speaker. Her response was that even though to an English speaker the を in ボールを投げる and the を in 道を歩く may seem different, to a Japanese speaker they are exactly the same. In both cases, を marks the direct object, not in some vague grammatical sense of the term, but in the very tangible sense that the ...


6

Another way to think of を in this sense is to do some action which "leaves something behind you", either literally or figuratively. Here are some additional examples: 公園を散歩する → Walk (through) the park; the park is "behind" you after you've walked through it. 家を出る → Leave home; home is now "behind" you in your time-line of activities 階段を下りる → Go ...


6

Because 分かる is an intransitive verb meaning "to be understood". If you wanted to keep the structure as close as possible to the original, you could literally translate 私は日本語がわかります as "regarding me, Japanese is understood". But, as you may have noticed, English and Japanese seldom share the same sentence structure; in English the same concept is expressed by ...


6

Although it is usually the transitive verb that takes a "Noun + を" in front of it, there is an important exception to this general rule. Intransitive verbs such as 向く、[走]{はし}る (to run)、[飛]{と}ぶ (to fly)、[出]{で}る (to get out), etc. can take a "Noun + を" when it describes the place of an action or the direction of a movement. 上を向く = to look upward ...


6

[公園]{こうえん}で[散歩]{さんぽ}します。 公園を散歩します。 Both sound okay to me and I don't think there's much difference in meaning... just the former sounds a bit more colloquial to me, I would write を if I was told to fill in the blank in 「公園( )散歩します。」 in Japanese class, but I think I usually say "公園で散歩してたらblah blah..." or "公園散歩してたらblah blah・・・" (leaving out the を/で) in ...


5

I would say it's a typo, but 17K Google results is hard to compete against. It may be incorrect grammar that gets "accepted" as correct and becomes incorporated into the language. Correct grammar would be: 雨は・が降る → "It's raining" or 雨を降らす → "Make it rain" (if someone/thing could cause rain -- like God, a spirit, character in a story, etc.)


5

It depends not only on the verb, but on the form of the verb. The general rule is that static verbs and adjectives take "ga" and "action verbs" take "o" on the direct object. piano-o hiku play the piano piano-ga hikeru can play the piano Here, playing the piano is an action, thus "o" is used. Being able to play the piano is a state, thus "ga" ...


5

I have lived in Japan for 5 years and speak Japanese quite fluently. Yes, を is very frequently used in Japanese. It's not only used for cake eating. ;) While a native probably wouldn't say "私はケーキを食べます。", I wouldn't call it "not good form." In everyday speech, a lot of particles are dropped. I don't think を is an underused particle, especially in written ...


5

Most definitely they do! (this pdf - http://lingdy.aacore.jp/jp/material/An_introduction_to_Ryukyuan_languages.pdf - is what I'm using as my source, it might be very helpful to you (^_^) ) Most of Ryuukyuuan uses =ja as a topic marker (though with some contextual variation in some languages). South Ryuukyuuan outside of Yaeyama uses =u for object marking ...


5

Building off of jkerian's answer, here are some translations which illustrate why を is the correct choice: この道でまっすぐ行ってください。 Please go straight in this road. (nonsensical) この道をまっすぐ行ってください。 Please take this road straight ahead.


5

Flaw's answer is of course correct, but here's another way to look at it. Start with a simple sentence like this: 犬{いぬ}が好{す}きだ。 "I like dogs." Since the predicate is a na-adjective, 好きだ, the object (犬) needs to be marked by が. (Your second sentence is ungrammatical for this reason, btw.) Then, if you want to say something like "I like running.", ...


4

It is a (pseudo) cleft sentence with the noun phrase and the topic ellided. I thought there was a variety among native speakers who accept を and who don't. しかも、かれは大きい庭付きの家を買った 'In fact, he bought a house that has a large garden.' (Original sentence) しかも、彼が買ったのは大きい庭付きの家(を)だ 'In fact, what he bought was a house that has a large garden.' ((Pseudo) ...



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