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1

私は無理です may be colloquially passable, but is logically incorrect, because you are saying “I am impossible” or “I am impossibility.” Clearly you are not “impossible” entity. 私には無理です means (そのことを行うのは)私には(私にとっては) 無理(なこと)です‐“It’s impossible (or difficult) for me (to do it), “ and sounds perfect to me. Japanese language is pretty loose in distinguishing noun and ...


1

I am actually not sure if "僕は無理です” is technically incorrect grammar. I can imagine a group of people talking about whether that would ever climb a mountain, and one of them says "僕は。。。。やっぱり無理です”. As "〜は” can mean "as for ~", I don't see a major difference in meaning between 僕は and 僕には in this case. I would be interested to hear from any native speakers to ...


1

I think you've answered it yourself: に gives the sense of "for". Consider "For me, it's impossible" vs. "Me, I'm [figuratively] impossible."


2

"A does not affect B" is translated as "AはBに影響しない" and "AはBに影響を与えない" , so (1) is unnatural. (2) and (3) are different. (2) is translated as "A isn't affected by B".


2

The は particle is frequently when expressing negative things, not just in the case of "ではない" (じゃない) but in a form like form "XはYがない". While there is some nuance difference, I think for the most part "には意味がない”,"では意味がない”, and "は意味がない” have a similar meaning. You can do a web search and see that they are all used in similar situations. However, in the ...


0

You are correct in your analysis of the meaning of the sentence, that the sub-clause "月はチーズの球だ" (where the subject is "月"), is nested inside the outer clause (where the subject is "人々"). Multiple occurrences of "は" particles in the same sentence is an interesting phenomenon, since it many times sounds perfectly natural. I believe it sounds more natural when ...


2

Let me caveat this answer by saying that I've only been learning for a year and use of は is a mind bending subject. First of all, は does not mean 'be'. If you really think this then you have a serious misunderstanding. In your example the function of 'be' is provided by です. は is the topic or contrast marker. For me the distinction between topic and contrast ...


2

Just the same as if there was only one person: AdamとSarahはすしが好{す}きです。 The topic of the conversation, marked by は, is the pair of both Adam and Sarah. Topics can be very complex phrases; they don't have to be just single words.


2

The particle will be the same regardless of number, so you would use は. Whether it's one person or two hundred people who like sushi, the particle will not change. AdamとSarahはすしがすきです。


2

As you said yourself, じゃ is just the colloquial form of では。If the sentence was written more "properly" it would be: 相手では意味が無い See: では・じゃ



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