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2

This kind of と is similar to も, which is used to form an adverbial phrase to indicate the speaker thinks the number is large. Intensifier phrases such as "as many as", "indeed", or "no less than" would be the equivalent. In your example sentences, I think these と are interchangeable with も. But unlike も, と can't be used with concrete numbers. と is used in ...


3

I think there is technically enough information in the comments and answers for this to be answered, but as none of the answers has been accepted I'll write it out a bit clearer. As oals indicated, the "とは” at the end of a sentence (possibly before a ね or な) means "とは思わなかった", which indicates surprise about a state. Note here that は is used after the と ...


2

I've seen this usage once in awhile, and haven't felt any difference in the meaning, but I did a search in Japanese to see what I could find. This (you may need to set EUC encoding to view this properly) is a pretty long treatment on the subject in Japanese, but the summary is that originally this final と was used, but at present this is omitted most of the ...


2

It’s hard for me to translate 案外役に立つ事がコロッと転がってたりする into Japanese, but I take it in the meaning of “You’ll find something lying before you just casually, which turns out to be helpful to you later in an unexpected way. コロッと is a colloquial variation of コロリと. コロリ is an onomatopoeia or ideo-phone to describe the status of something / someone dropping, falling, ...


3

This コロッと isn't really describing the quality of the thing itself, I mean, it is, but much more reflecting the speaker's impression or observation. In your example, 転がっている alone can fully depict the situation, "it's lying on the ground". The remainder, コロッと and ~たりする both represent the speaker's mood. コロッと implies (of course not round or rolling-ness here) ...


3

That 「と」 must be written in hiragana because it is a particle. You have no choice here. The 「と」 turns the preceding word 「コロッ」 into an adverb form so that it can modify the verb phrase 「[転]{ころ}がってたりする」. 「ころっ/コロッ」 is a colloquial and onomatopoeic "word"; therefore, it is not very important whether you write it in hiragana or katakana. You have a choice ...


6

「ジョンさんはうちととしょかんでべんきょうします。」 This sentence is grammatical but it does not sound very natural for a couple of reasons. 1) Use of 「うち」. In this sentence, the speaker is NOT ジョン. When native Japanese-speakers hear just 「うち」, we would tend to think it refers to the speaker's home as @broccoli forest states in the comment above. To avoid that, you can use ...


2

Just the same as if there was only one person: AdamとSarahはすしが好{す}きです。 The topic of the conversation, marked by は, is the pair of both Adam and Sarah. Topics can be very complex phrases; they don't have to be just single words.


2

The particle will be the same regardless of number, so you would use は. Whether it's one person or two hundred people who like sushi, the particle will not change. AdamとSarahはすしがすきです。


4

As far as grammar, the following is the main difference: 「~~と」 must be followed by a verb phrase. When it is not, the verb has intentionally been left unmentioned. [手紙]{てがみ}に、「[好]{す}きです」と[書]{か}いた。(書いた is a verb.) 「~~という」 must be followed by a noun or a form of nominalization. 「こんにちは」というあいさつは、[夜]{よる}にはしません。(あいさつ is a noun) With this basic ...



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