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8

This sentence says "(I) will be fired in no more than 10 days." (time)と待たずに is a common set phrase which literally means "without waiting for (time)". This と is not "if" nor "then". The role of と here corresponds to the sixth entry of デジタル大辞泉's definition. 6 (数量を表す語に付き、打消しの表現を伴って)その範囲以上には出ない意を表す。…までも。「全部で一〇〇円―かからない」「一〇〇キロ―走らなかった」


8

Both are 100% grammatical and natural-sounding, but since the two phrases are used in different situations/contexts, they are not interchangeable. 「犬{いぬ}と猫{ねこ}が好{す}き」 is said when "dogs and cats" have not specifically been mentioned between the speaker and listener. The best example of that situation would be when someone asks you the question: ...


6

You should parse it as: と、この状況で思っちゃう僕は・・・ The と is the quotative particle.


6

I ignored likelihood and awkwardness. I assumed that you are only interested in usage of と and 話す, and that it is allowed to add any contexts. 「食べていると話す」can both mean "X tells Y that Z is eating" or "X talks to Y while Z is eating." However, the pitch-accents are different in standard Japanese. 「食べているとはなす」(X tells Y that Z is eating.) ...


6

{ [ (引き返してきた →) ヘイゼル ] と再び見まえた → } 三蔵一行 Sanzo party { ← which confronted [ Hazel ( ← who came back ) ] } I think 見まえる here is probably a (common) misspelling for まみえる (=meet, confront). This と is simply an ordinary particle used with まみえる/会う/待ち合わせをする/etc. (eg 明日彼と会う = "meet him tomorrow") Of course due to the different word order of the two languages, the ...


6

「ジョンさんはうちととしょかんでべんきょうします。」 This sentence is grammatical but it does not sound very natural for a couple of reasons. 1) Use of 「うち」. In this sentence, the speaker is NOT ジョン. When native Japanese-speakers hear just 「うち」, we would tend to think it refers to the speaker's home as @broccoli forest states in the comment above. To avoid that, you can use ...


5

"犬と猫が好き" = "I like dogs and cats (among animals.)" A typical answer to the question "what kind of animals do you like?" "犬も猫も好き" = "I like both dogs and cats." A possible answer to the question "which do you like better, dogs or cats?"


5

「と」 here is a quotative particle used to quote 「ふん」; It is not an abbreviation of anything. 「と」, all by itself, is in its full form. It may look like 「と」 is at the beginning of the sentence, but in essence, it is the same as: 「ふん」と、彼女は鼻を鳴らし、中学の制服である・・・・ A direct quote, no matter how short it is, is often treated as a full line in stories, which is what ...


5

In English it's "to marry someone" (direct object), in Japanese it's 誰かと結婚する "to marry [with] someone". So, yes, it is literally "marry the princess".


5

Is there a major difference between ~だろうと and ~でも constructions in nuance? In nuance, no, not really. If anything, 「~だろうと」 would certainly sound more eloquent than 「~でも」. 「~でも」 could sound kind of blunt or unrefined when used to mean 「~だろうと」. Can ~だろうと only be used with question words? I've seen any volitional followed by と for an effect like ...


5

That use of と should be conceptualized as “with”[1], and not “from”. “Xと離れる” is “to separate[2] with X”. Since you can both separate with and separate from something, both と and から work here (albeit with the subtle difference between “separating with” and “separating from” something[3]). “Xから聞く” is “to hear from X”. Replacing this with と would change the ...


5

「と」 is used as a particle in both cases. 1.「ふりむくと、こどもたちが おおきな やまを つくっています。」 Here, the 「と」 is a conjunctive particle meaning "when" as in "When I did A, I saw B happening." The sentence means "When I turned around, the kids were making a huge mountain." The tense used in the original is the present, but it is the historical present, which is why I ...


5

Construction and meaning You might have already encountered the positive volitional + と: this indicates something that the subject is trying to do, such as 店{みせ}に行{い}こうとする: to try to go to the store. The final verb is what is happening, and the volitional verb before it is a kind of dependent hoped-for result: "suru so as to iku to the store". The ...


5

「いいかげんにしやがれっ おれは[一年以上]{いちねんいじょう}もシャバとおわかれなんだぞっ。」 (「シャバ」 means the world outside of prison, army, etc. where you have freedom.) The 「と」 in that context is not quotative because in the phrase 「シャバとおわかれ」, no one is saying or calling something 「シャバ」 either silently or out loud. It just means "a farewel to the real world". The fact that 「おわかれ」 is a noun ...


5

原子核の崩壊を引き起こす力と,力を媒介する未知の粒子の存在を仮定する This means: Assuming the existence of [(原子核の崩壊を引き起こす)力] and [(力を媒介する)未知の粒子] If there is no comma, it can be read as: Assuming the existence of [(原子核の崩壊を引き起こす and 力と力を媒介する)未知の粒子] or Assuming the existence of 〈[{(原子核の崩壊を引き起こす)力と力}を媒介する]未知の粒子〉


5

「なぜと[申]{もう}しますと」 In this case, 「と」at the end is a conjunctive particle that serves as a preface to the statement that follows. Thus, the only statement that can logically follow 「なぜと[申]{もう}しますと」 is one that explains the reason for whatever is being discussed. The 「と」 in 「なぜと」, by the way, is quotative in case anyone is wondering. So we have two ...


4

It is quotative. 漢字試験は理解力より記憶力を試すものだと批判されています。 ≒ 漢字試験は、『理解力より記憶力を試すものだ。』と批判されています。 The 『~~~』 part is what some people have been saying about the test.


4

Your understanding of the sentence looks OK, but as I said this in a comment above, I have no idea what part you are referring to as a "relative clause". I see no relative clause used anywhere. My "answer" below is based on the assumption that the sentence actually ends where you ended it. In children's stories, punctuations are often "ignored" so it is ...


4

夜になろうと朝を迎えようと ≒夜になろうが朝を迎えようが ≒夜になっても朝を迎えても (more casual) 「~しようと~しようと」 means "(regardless of) whether ~~ or ~~". This ~ようと is like "even if~~", consisting of 意志・推量の助動詞「う・よう」 + 接続助詞「と」. This usage of と is #❷-4-ア on goo辞書: 逆接の仮定条件を表す。たとえ…であっても。…ても。㋐意志・推量の助動詞「う」「よう」「まい」などに付く。「何を言われよう―気にしない」「雨が降ろう―風が吹こう―、毎日見回りに出る」


4

「[察]{さっ}してくれよ、とボイスくんが[僕]{ぼく}を[見]{み}る。」 Does と in that sentence imply と言って ("Understand it please - said ボイスくん looking at me.")? No, it does not imply that. If ボイスくん had actually said 「察してくれよ」 out loud to 僕, the author surely would have expressed that using a direct quote just like all those direct quotes from the beginning. Besides, the ...


4

Recently, @naruto mentioned the phrase 頭が赤い魚を食べた猫, which can be understood in many ways. There is some ambiguity in how each word relates to each other. Among other possibilities, it could mean [(頭が赤い)魚]を食べた猫 (red-headed fish) [(頭が赤い)+(魚を食べた)]猫 (red-headed cat) The same applies here. Consider the following pattern: AとBとCのD As far as logic and ...


4

As far as grammar, the following is the main difference: 「~~と」 must be followed by a verb phrase. When it is not, the verb has intentionally been left unmentioned. [手紙]{てがみ}に、「[好]{す}きです」と[書]{か}いた。(書いた is a verb.) 「~~という」 must be followed by a noun or a form of nominalization. 「こんにちは」というあいさつは、[夜]{よる}にはしません。(あいさつ is a noun) With this basic ...


3

my best guess is that it's meant to be quotative Yep. You could follow that と with 彼女 が 言いました or the something like と いう 状態 です つまりパスポートもビザもない、という状態です つまりパスポートもビザもない、と彼女が言いました So you might call it an abbreviated quotative use. Can anyone tell me ... what semantic purpose is served by keeping just the 「と」 instead of making a full ...


3

It is indeed the conditional と but takes more of the form of 'when' rather than 'if', in a similar way to how とき is used. You'll see it used in this way quite a lot. This also means that anything before と doesn't necessarily have a cause-effect relationship. It's not because the the women was doing her laundry by the river that the peach came. ...


3

As you already noticed that the と is used as the quote marker in the first sentence. That means 雨がいつ降るか is written as the person's thought, which makes the sentence more subjective. On the contrary, the second sentence sounds more objective. Relatively with or without personal feelings might be the crucial difference between the two sentences. By the way, ...


3

Yes you are right, the と is used as a quote. Feliksas - I am called that. Once you know the root of the word 申します the reason becomes clear. 申します is the keigo (polite) form of 言います. と言います can be used for reported speech. あの女の子は「私はもう大丈夫です」と言いました。 That girl said "I am all right now". That girl said she was all right at the time. On a side note - if you are ...


3

Sounds good to me. You've got your general 〜という formation here, only it's a little embellished. 言いよう is a "way/manner of speaking"; in other words, a way to describe something. [麗]{うら}らか is not an onomotopœia, but an adjective meaning "beautiful". 麗らかと言いようのある日 would be "a day described as beautiful". However, しか meaning "only" requires a negative verb, ...


3

と can be used to report speech, thought, or intention (it marks either direct speech or indirect speech.) "... to iimashita." = I said that ..." "... to omoimashita. = "I thought that ..." "... と覚悟していた" = "I was prepared for ..." Your translation is something like: "When I wrote the fake book review, although I was prepared for the possibility that ...


3

The first instance of the と particle is the と-conditional and the second is the と-quoting particle. 琥珀さんは謝れって言ってたけど、あんな話を聞いたあとだとヘンに意識してしまって、困る。 I had been told to apologize to Kohaku but after having been told so, I strangely noticed that it would be embarassing. Assuming 琥珀 is the subject of 聞いた and that 話 refers to the story that should be kept ...


3

That 「と」 must be written in hiragana because it is a particle. You have no choice here. The 「と」 turns the preceding word 「コロッ」 into an adverb form so that it can modify the verb phrase 「[転]{ころ}がってたりする」. 「ころっ/コロッ」 is a colloquial and onomatopoeic "word"; therefore, it is not very important whether you write it in hiragana or katakana. You have a choice ...



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