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8

I'm not sure what's confusing you but... Japanese often omits the subject when it's obvious from the context, so your first sentence can be read as: 『日本の中で食べ物は高い』と(私は)思う。 (I think that food is expensive in Japan.) The と is the case particle as a quotative marker. Likewise, your second sentence can be read as: 『さけおさんは酒を飲まない』と(私は)思う。 (I think ...


6

I am going to post a rather simplistic answer just covering the basics.  There are cases (1) where adding a 「と」 is appropriate, (2) where adding a 「と」 is inappropriate, and (3) where only adding a 「に」, not a 「と」 is appropriate. 1) When an onomatopoeia functions adverbially to modify a verb, a 「と」 is often added. In very informal speech, on the ...


5

The difference between 「~~ために」 and 「~~ためにと」 can be very subtle at times; nevertheless a difference does exist. To use 「~~ために」, the speaker needs to be 100% certain of what the reason for an action is. The action-taker may be either the speaker himself or another person. If the latter is the case, the speaker already possesses enough information to ...


4

It's the quotative particle と, i.e. 「初撃の後の陽動のために」と用意した慧による「姫」の誘拐作戦。 The actual meaning isn't much different, but gives a slight nuance that 「初撃の後の陽動のために」 are somebody else's words (e.g. 慧's), not the speaker/narrator's. I would need more context to see if this is done for a specific reason.


4

This looks to me like a case of the conditional と, basically meaning 'if/when'. The sentence then breaks down like this: [[友人に彼女ができると]辛い] You've got 彼女ができる a bit wrong - it's not 'become a girlfriend' but rather 'get a girlfriend'. You have to figure out what 友人に is doing here, also. The '[someone] gets a girlfriend' doesn't have a marked subject or ...


4

You may be reading too much into this; It is pretty simple. Verb A + ようと + Verb B = "do B" so as to / in order to / for the purpose of "do A". A is your goal / purpose. B is the method you are taking to achieve A. ひとまず心を落ち着けようと、飲みかけのオレンジジュースに手を伸ばす。 means: "I extend my arm to the unfinished (glass of) orange juice so as to relax myself for now."


3

You're 90% there. Let's take your list in order, shall we? 1. Quotation Particle As you noted, if you see it followed by a verb indicating expression (思う、言う、話す, etc.) then it's being used in this manner. 2. Conditional Particle The following sentence is the way I was taught to use this one: 秋になると、葉が落ちる。 "When autumn comes, the leaves fall." In ...


3

You know what 辛【つら】い means in this context, but the interpretation of the first half of the sentence is not correct. "友人に彼女ができる" means "a friend gets a girlfriend". 友人が彼女になる My friend become a girlfriend (of me, or someone else) 彼女から友人に戻る Become from a girlfriend to just a friend (break up) This sentence, as a whole, means "It's a painful thing that my ...


2

I think it's the opposite? が simply states the fact, while は would imply "at least". I'm a native speaker myself. For example, 銀メダルが取れた -> I got the silver medal 銀メダルは取れた -> I got at least the silver medal (but not the gold medal) 銀メダルが取れないと帰れない -> If I don't get the silver medal, I can't return 銀メダルは取れないと帰れない -> If I don't even get ...


2

I would say this と is a condensed form of と思っているで but this is to quibble about specifics in terms of what the quotatitive implies rather to disagree with ちょこれーと. I would probably translate the whole as follows: "Even though I have been living alone for two years, my cooking has not gotten any better. Saki hasn't cooked either, but more than it not being ...



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