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23

I've asked this very question in the past and my research led me to the following definition which (surprisingly) differs from every other answer here so far: ~となる expresses a discrete change, while ~になる can express either a discrete or a continuous change. You can feasibly use ~になる for everything, since it covers all cases, but in cases where you want to ...


11

The most usual way is to attach と to all alternatives except for the last one: りんごとオレンジが好きだ。 りんごとオレンジとパパイヤが好きだ。 (Unrelated note: “papaya” is usually パパイヤ rather than パパヤ in Japanese.) Attaching と to all alternatives including the last one is acceptable. りんごとオレンジとが好きだ。 りんごとオレンジとパパイヤとが好きだ。 I heard that in older days, と was always attached to ...


11

Basically, を follows a noun (eg. "車") or a nominal group (eg. "私が運転してる車"), not a proposition. (This) と follows a proposition, not a noun or nominal group. 行こうを思う is thus not grammatical. You'd want 行くことを思う for a grammatically correct sentence. It would mean that you think of the concept of going. It is different from thinking of you going, which would be ...


8

I think it can be replaced with は and というのは here, as in [2] [1] at this Daijisen definition. According to the 日本語文型辞典, this って indicates a subject, and can be an informal way in speech to state meanings/definitions or to add value/emphasis. When used after nouns and adjectives to state meanings/definitions, this って can correspond with とは. When used ...


8

Here is how I would categorize these usages. There are probably other ways to explain them, and I do not claim that mine is the best in any sense. (1) ~ようと思う, ~ようと考える, and ~ようと決める are just the usual use of the particle と which signifies quotation, and there is nothing special about the combination of a volitional and と. For example, I think that particle ...


7

From what I have learned and observed, ~となる implies a "suppose if" conditional, something similar to "suppose if it is the case that [X] would become [Y] then" where as ~になる simply means "[X] becomes [Y]". 「請求書のお支払いは現金のみとなりますので、ご了承くださいませ。」 would mean something like "Suppose if you need to pay your purchase by cash, we hope to get your understanding.". This ...


7

へと is used when you are directing your audience's attention to the content that comes after the と for emphasis. 「やや強意の副詞的表現に属することを表す」 Example: 透【す】き通【とお】るような青【あお】空【ぞら】の中【なか】へと白【しろ】いボールが吸【す】い込まれていく The white ball disappeared into the crystal clear blue sky 透き通るような青空の中 へ 白いボールが吸い込まれていく Without the と it is simply a statement of fact. Q: "What did the ...


7

I feel like this has been asked before, but I can't find it if it has. You've got it spot on with と being the quotation marker; that is Xと言う means that X was literally (more or less) what was said. Using を is more about the meaning/gist/essence of what is said. Here's a pair that I always remember to help distinguish them. なにを言ってるのか? → "What are ...


6

The examples are very interesting. It looks like, whenever と知る can be used, it means "find out" rather than "know". Another way to say this is, whenever と知る can be used, you can replace the verb with 分かる. With "find out", you cannot have duration, in other words, you can say: I knew that theorem for two days, (but I forgot it). but you cannot say * ...


6

I think what's really going on here can be traced back to the two different ways 形容動詞 (けいようどうし: adjectival nouns or "な-adjectives") were inflected. If we look under the 連用形 (れんようけい: the "adverbial inflection", for lack of a better term) column under the first table on this Wikibooks page detailing Classical Japanese inflection patterns, we find the following ...


6

I am going to post a rather simplistic answer just covering the basics.  There are cases (1) where adding a 「と」 is appropriate, (2) where adding a 「と」 is inappropriate, and (3) where only adding a 「に」, not a 「と」 is appropriate. 1) When an onomatopoeia functions adverbially to modify a verb, a 「と」 is often added. In very informal speech, on the ...


5

Just adding to an existing answer because I typically don't think of these two as comparisons, I look at it from a different angle than the OP. I typically think of this as more of expectation rather than comparison for ~にしては, although comparison could be valid as well but I never think of it like that. So as @istrasci pointed out, ~にしては means "Considering ...


5

Francis Drohan's A handbook of Japanese usage has four whole pages on the usages of と, so I don't think a comprehensive answer is appropriate here. But a few key points: There are two kinds of と: one is a case particle (格助詞), and another is a conjunctive particle (接続助詞). In both your examples, と is being used as a case particle. According to Drohan, there ...


5

The difference between 「~~ために」 and 「~~ためにと」 can be very subtle at times; nevertheless a difference does exist. To use 「~~ために」, the speaker needs to be 100% certain of what the reason for an action is. The action-taker may be either the speaker himself or another person. If the latter is the case, the speaker already possesses enough information to ...


4

I do not know what “adverbialisation” means, because the particle と which signifies quotation, change of state, and supposition also makes an adverbial phrase. This と signifies a limit on something in a similar way to “even” in English, but its usage is restricted compared to “even.” と is attached to a small quantity and used with negation, and means that ...


4

It's best to consider 二度と as an adverb on its own, meaning '(not) again'. The 二度 here is pronounced 「にど」, but the meaning aligns with its alternate reading, 「ふたたび」 -- which is, of course, usually written 再び in modern Japanese. The と here feels very similar in usage to the と in an onomatopoeic expression like きっぱりと [an intuition which seems to be confirmed, ...


4

The と in (1, 2) is the same と as used in quoting. It leads a subordinate clause. Unlike predicates like 言う 'say', which can take direct or indirect quotation, predicates like 合図する 'signal' cannot take quotation. It expresses an accompanied message. Without と, it is ambiguous. It may be a purposive clause or a clause expressing the accompanied message. ...


4

Instead of だと, it should be broken down into だ(copula) and と(particle). と here is used as a particle that indicates an uncontrollable event or state will follow after what the particle marks. Sometimes parsed as if but not really accurate since it's not really a conditional. Also can be parsed as when. 日本だと[A] would mean "if/when in Japan, [A] follows as a ...


4

許可 'permit' is not an activity done to each other. A permits B. Asymmetric. Therefore, the sentence should be taken as your first interpretation: 'Friend One and Friend Two have given permission to have their feeds be subscribed'. If it is particularly necessary to express mutual activity, the sentence would have been [Friend One]さんと[Friend Two]さんが(お)互いのフィード ...


4

~にしては means "Considering X is Y, ..." トムはお金持ちにしては、あまりぜいたくな人生をおくらない (Considering Tom is pretty rich, he doesn't lead a very luxurious lifestyle ~としては mean "As a / In the capacity of X, ..." 弁護士であるわたしとしては、それを勧めるわけにはいかない (As a lawyer, I cannot recommend (doing) that) So the latter is when the thing actually is the thing you're comparing to.


4

~となる is also limited to nouns, I believe. The way I've heard it most often used is when the thing it becomes kind of fulfills some purpose. Kind of hard to explain. Here's my best example: 私は先生になります → I will become a teacher. 寄付となる金を貯金します → I deposit all money that will be (used for) donated. Don't know if that helps at all.


4

I expect to see/hear「税率が10パーセントへと下がる」on newspaper or TV news. I'd say「税率が10パーセントに下がる」in normal conversation. (I'm not sure if we say「税率が10パーセントへ下がる」.) 「来年度へと先送りする」「来年度へ先送りする」are what I expect to see/hear on newspaper or TV news. I think I use「来年度に先送りする」in daily conversation, and I wouldn't say 「来年度へと先送りされる」when I talk casually. To me,「旅客機は東京へと旅立った」sounds ...


4

but can it also be applied to verbs that imply some kind of thinking process other than 思う? Yes, all of them, I think. Do these make grammatical sense? Yes. But I wonder how to say the third one. The translation is weird… With 感じる、 I think that a better example is もう死んでいたと感じた I felt that he was already dead (say, by touching him) If so, ...


4

It's like 咲も必要が無い上に興味が向かないと言って料理はしなかった。 咲も必要が無い上に興味が向かないという理由で料理はしなかった。 The と is the case particle as a quotative marker. The reasons 咲 didn't cook are 必要が無い and 興味が向かない. By the way, the ここ in ここ2年 means "these (two years)", not "here (location)", and you're missing 一人 (alone) in 一人暮らしをしていたけど・・・.


4

You may be reading too much into this; It is pretty simple. Verb A + ようと + Verb B = "do B" so as to / in order to / for the purpose of "do A". A is your goal / purpose. B is the method you are taking to achieve A. ひとまず心を落ち着けようと、飲みかけのオレンジジュースに手を伸ばす。 means: "I extend my arm to the unfinished (glass of) orange juice so as to relax myself for now."


4

It's the quotative particle と, i.e. 「初撃の後の陽動のために」と用意した慧による「姫」の誘拐作戦。 The actual meaning isn't much different, but gives a slight nuance that 「初撃の後の陽動のために」 are somebody else's words (e.g. 慧's), not the speaker/narrator's. I would need more context to see if this is done for a specific reason.


3

This text, even with the context taken into account, does not make much sense. 存分に refers to doing something seriously with one's full might. So it doesn't fit where the homework solves itself without human interventions. I'd say this is a mistake of "その名に恥じず放置すればするだけ自然と進行してくれればそれは非常に楽だけど" The previous line from the girl asks the boy to stop studying and ...


3

I've heard that ~となります is popular to use because "it sounds formal", but actually its usage is incorrect, since です should be used instead. I'd guess that the same thing happens with になります、which would be just another form of saying です incorrectly (in this context). Formalish way : 請求書のお支払いは現金のみとなりますので、ご了承くださいませ。 Correct way : 請求書のお支払いは現金のみですので、ご了承くださいませ。 ...


2

From what I gather at Chiebukuro, all three are the same, though the one who answered (dendenko123, a master in Japanese category of Chiebukuro) said that と has a slightly formal feeling. Of course, there are fukushi(副詞)-class adverbs that is so popularly used one way, that usage in the other two is almost unheard of, except in idiomatic usage. For example, ...


2

(Possibly this was the original context, and you cut it down for the flashcard? http://ch25oda.kitaguni.tv/e1678763.html ) He is denying "可能性", and 「念頭に全くない」 is quoting the phrasing he used to deny it. You can think of it as close to: 彼は、可能性について「念頭に全くない」と言って否定した。 "Regarding the possibility, he denied it, saying..." As opposed to: ...



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