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0

Yes you can. This is one of the cases where の effectively acts as の + noun. The noun is implicit and as stated in previous answers it is 物{もの}. You can read more about how の works here.


3

Yes it works. だれの can stand for だれのもの too.


0

Well... how about this あの かさ は だれ の もの ですか Ano kasa-wa dare-no mono desu-ka?


1

First, I'm going to explain about sentence ender ね (not interjectional ね). It has several usages and among them, there's one that can be interpreted like English tag question. But there's a function that's shared by those usages. It is to indicate that information accompanied with な or ね is your impression or conclusion through observation (including ...


4

It's all about emphasis. Plain and simple 簡単です: "It's easy". But that's a bit abrupt for the Japanese speaker who doesn't want you to feel stupid that you need to have it explained, so s(he) says instead... 簡単ですね: "It's easy, isn't it?" This creates a little fiction that instead of telling you something you don't know and thus exposing your ignorance, he ...


3

It is because X番目に is an adverb, and X番目の behaves like an adjective. Because you can't have an adjective to describe another adjective, X番目に is needed to order objects based on a quality given by an adjective. Thus, in your example, 「二番目に高い建物です」, に is needed because you are ranking the buildings based on the adjective 高い. On the other hand, の is used if ...


1

To put it as directly as possible, based on my experiences and learning, the best way to describe the article の appearing at the end of questions, after verbs, is to convey a stronger sense of curiosity than simply asking the question without it. If you're familiar with the んですか?[noun]なんですか? construction, it plays a similar role. You might think of it as: ...


4

My thinking is that "私" is always in the "universe of discussion". Yes, and that's why you should always say, for example, 「私は本を買った」, but not 「私が本を買った」in simple sentences, unless "exhaustive listing" is clearly intended. But in relative clauses modifying a noun, we have to use が or の. は is the "topic marker", and a relative clause does not serve as the ...


1

It is not a question of possession. I'll show it to you using your example. Let's say : He has built a car. 彼が車を造りました。 If you want to say more about the car e.g.’ The car he built got famous in the whole country.’, it comes to the change your question is about. The sentence will be like this. 彼の造った車が、全国で有名になりました。


1

I assumed that this sentence is used in a context where a child asks his mother/father to buy him something, yet the parent said no, due to the child being too young. If translated directly, it would be something like "If I become how old, will you buy it for me?" いくつ can be translated as "how many" or "how old", and in this case, I used "how old". ...


1

願いの叶う家 = 願いが叶う家 as @choco said. A general rule is that if the construct is X の Y Z where X is a pronoun or noun, Y is a verb, and Z is a noun, then の is really が. For more on why, see the link above.


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It translates to "A house that makes wishes come true." Not sure what the context is of the sentence, with that alone it seems to be the above.



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