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20

Your example is perfectly correct and natural. Using ~の twice in a row is usual. (I am not so sure about particles other than の, but in this answer, I will focus on repetition of の.) How about more repetitions? I agree with Dave M G that, as far as correctness is concerned, you can use as many ~の as you like. However, if a sentence uses ~の many times in ...


17

As you said, コンニャロー is abbreviated この野郎, which means “you bastard.” バーロー is abbreviation of ばか野郎, “you fool” or something. In this case, probably neither of them is directed to any specific person, but both are used just as general phrases for expressing frustration or anger. Other parts do not have any meaning. Huh? Well, バーロー岬 is a pun of バーロー and ...


15

I think the confusion here arises from the fact that English can use the "-ing" form of a verb in two different ways: using a verb as a noun (gerund), or expressing a continuous action (progressive tense). In plain language, adding の to a verb in Japanese transforms it into a noun and makes it suitable to be followed by は, が, or various other particles that ...


13

As I understand it, the term “no-adjective” simply means “nouns which are typically translated to adjectives in English and other languages.” If we treat Japanese as a language in its own right, distinguishing them from nouns as different parts-of-speech is completely artificial. The particle の makes a modifier of a noun. The exact relationship between ...


12

This の signifies the two words refer to the same thing, and 相手の日本人 means someone who is 相手 and 日本人 at the same time. I do not think that using 日本人の相手 when you mean 相手の日本人 is incorrect. However, 日本人の相手 is ambiguous: it may mean the same as 相手の日本人, but it may also mean an opponent/partner/company of some Japanese person, as in 吉田さんの相手. This is probably why ...


11

I think that in some cases, ending a question in の is fine for male speakers. For example, I hear え~、そうなの? quite often from male speakers. I think, in general, we have that (all male speech) rhetorical questions are allowed to end in の, e.g. even if it is clear what the other person is doing, you may ask 何をしてるの? or 何してんの? What (the heck) are ...


11

In your example, 日本人の知らない is a relative clause, equivalent in meaning to 日本人が知らない. This clause as a whole modifies 日本語, so it means the Japanese that Japanese people don't know. In relative clauses, the subject particle が can be replaced with の: ジョンが買った本 ジョンの買った本 The book John bought This is true in double-subject constructions as ...


9

Chakoshi to the rescue! (Chakoshi is a tool for searching both the Aozora and conversational Japanese corpora at Nagoya University.) A quick search for a "[noun]ん[noun]" pattern in the conversational corpus gives 262 results, most of which are what you are asking about. Broken down, there's actually not much variety in the nouns that follow ん: とき (99): ...


9

より, when preceding an adjective as in your examples, means "more" or "-er": より多くの more [numerous] より快適な more pleasant, smoother より長い longer より良い better より一般的な more common, more typical As such, でより and でのより should not be considered together. で and での go with the preceding word, and より goes with the succeeding word.


8

Actually I don't find it surprising. It may be just my own experience but, English: [a] "When I was in (primary/secondary/middle/high/etc.) school......" (More common) as opposed to, [b] "When I was a (primary/secondary/middle/high/etc.) school student......" (Not as common) Chinese: [a] "(我在)[小/中/大]学時......" (More common) as ...


8

As you correctly note, the が in this context adds focus to the noun phrase: 私が一番 'I am the best.' or 'The best one is me' 私は一番 'I am the best.' [私]{わたくし} is very formal and polite, and is not usually used other than in business conversations, [私]{わたし} is neutral with politeness, 俺 is rough, and 俺様 is self-appraising. Any of them will work with ...


8

There is no restriction on the number of のs you can string together. It might get a little silly looking after a point, but there is no grammatical rule that prevents it.


8

のに can have several meanings, "despite" being the most common one. But it can also mean "in order to" (~のため)。Here are some examples (taken from here http://www.jgram.org/pages/viewOne.php?tagE=noni-2): パスポートは海外旅行に行くのに必要です。 A passport is necessary to travel abroad. 電子レンジは冷めた料理を温めるのに重宝だ。 A microwave is handy to heat up cold food.


7

I suspect it's the nominalizer の, making the noun phrase "...温めるの". Then the 'directional/intention' particle に is appended, giving intention towards which the 電子レンジ can be considered 重宝. This can be occasionally tricky to sort out from the "in spite of" usage, but it is an alternate parse to be aware of.


7

It's just standard GA-NO conversion. [日本人が知らない]日本語 'Japanese that [Japanese don't know]'


7

If I'm not mistaken, I think there are two acceptable ways to say this in English, too: そのうちの一つの箱は私のです。 One box among those is mine. (more literally) Among those, one box is mine. その箱のうちの一つは私のです。 One of those boxes is mine. It's true the former looks slightly less-organized, but the nuance is fairly small in spoken language.


7

I interpret it as that being the "kind" of fondness this person has. It might make more sense if you put quotes around it or add という. 「お嫁さんにしたい」の好き お嫁さんにしたいという好き お嫁さんにしたい is being used as a phrase to describe what kind of 好き it is but not in a way that follows the normal rules of grammar, or to put it more precisely, not in a way that follows how you ...


7

The direct object particle を stands next to the word of phrase that is the direct object in your sentence. This phrase in your translation is 「わたし の てがみ の うえ の つくえ」. To analyse the meaning of this phrase, let's look at its parts: 「わたし の てがみ」 - My letter. 「わたし の てがみ の うえ」 - Above my letter. 「わたし の てがみ の うえ の つくえ」 - The desk above my letter. So the direct ...


7

の here is not a possessive の, it's a nominalizer, a formal noun. こんな is adjectival and cannot by itself constitute a noun phrase. In other words, こんな means "this type of", こんなの means "this type of thing".


6

With respect to the meaning of たらしめる, you can just follow what Matt writes, but let me add a few things. こそ is used to add emphasis to that noun. A literal translation will be It is ... that is .... Your addition of のは simply makes it ungrammatical. 作品を芸術たらしめる is a relative clause that modifies the noun 要素 (I hope this is not too linguistic to you). And ...


6

芸術たらしめる is the causative form of 芸術たる. This たる is the たる discussed here. There are nuances, but basically たらしめる means "cause to be". (Roughly equivalent to ... にさせる in many cases, I think.) So the sentence is complete as it is: 想像力こそ = "Imagination..." + こそ (こそ is a whole other question) 作品を芸術たらしめる要素 = "the element that causes 'works' 作品 to be(come) 'art' ...


6

I believe that the の here is the same の as the の which is explained in this thread: What is the difference between the nominalizers こと and の? Basically the の here is a noun which means "thing". It is similar to こと (noun) which also means "thing". The difference between の and こと is that の is used when the "thing" is related to the speaker. This is furthur ...


6

In this case, 「の」 changes the verb "to [be] see" into the gerund form "[be] seeing", which is what you found interesting. After that, 「は」 is just 「は」.


6

In addition to what the other says, it can also be used as an informal question signifier. そうなの? Sou na no? "Really?" [Fem.] なんでだめなの? Nande dame no "Why not?" or "What's wrong with it?" 何言ってんだけ分かってんの? Nani itten-dake wakatten no? "Do you know what you're saying?"


6

Both could be が without changing the meaning. In this case, though, it is possible to use の in basically the same way without changing the meaning. This の is not the same as the の that you learned as a noun modifier, like in 私の家, but rather the nominative case (主格). I am not an expert on grammar, but there is a lengthy post on this subject here (in ...


6

私の辞書がありません does NOT mean "I do not have my dictionary." This is a very common mistake among J-learners. To us native speakers, it can ONLY mean "My dictionary is missing." as in "I brought my dictionary here but I can't find it now. Where did it go?" Yes, 私は辞書がありません means "I do not have a dictionary." 私の子供がいます does not mean "The child is mine." It is ...


5

I'm going to offer a different answer. I think it does not work the way you think. んだ is a statement, which works as emphasis of what is being said/thought now. It can not be used the same way in the past. 忙しいんだ。 It's just that I'm busy. has as past tense 忙しかったんだ。 It's just that I was busy. whereas It was just that I was busy. cannot ...


5

One way is to look at them as exclusive (ほかの) and inclusive (ほかに). だれかほかの人に聞いてごらん Ask somebody else [someone other than me/someone other than this person] for help. ほかに行きたい人はいますか [In addition to who already wants to go] is there anyone else who wants to go? Notice that you can use "besides" in both sentences: 1. Ask someone besides me. 2. ...


5

I think コンコン also has an effect to bring smooth transition to the subsequent element コンニャロ in terms of sound. "kon" phonetically is a part of "kon-nya-ro". So, "kon-kon-konnyaro" sounds like a stutter (to me). By the way, do you know ニャロメ, a cartoon character created by Fujio Akatsuka? コンニャロ could be expanded to コンニャロメ, and I cannot help thinking that ニャロメ ...


5

Derek already answered the question well, but let me add an important difference between English and Japanese about comparisons. While “より X” means “more X,” simple “X” can also mean “more X.” In other words, unlike English, the comparative degree does not have to be made explicit in Japanese. The adverb より clarifies or emphasizes that it is about a ...



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