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8

Both 「[映画]{えいが}で[見]{み}る」 and 「映画に見る」 are correct and natural phrases but they have different meanings. 「映画で見る」 is the simpler and more often used of the two. If you saw a certain thing, place, actor, etc. in a movie, you 映画で those things を見た. Those tangible objects just physically appeared in the movie and you saw them. 「映画に見る」 is less often used and ...


7

Since the sentence says 友達にばれた, it means that your friend found out. There is another hint in the sentence, though: しまった is usually used to convey an unfortunate event/outcome/happening from the point of the speaker. In this case this is your friend finding out about your lie. To get the other meaning with the least change, we can say 友達の嘘がばれてしまった my ...


7

To "answer" without further context, something had to be going right or as planned in the story. 「それ」 refers to that whole situation where things were good. Then, something had to happen to prevent things from going right and you are now wondering how in the world this could have happened. Correct? The phrase in question could not mean anything else. ...


6

First, your translation of the example is not correct, but that doesn't matter with respect to what you want to know. The example means "if there is a team that beats Team A, then...". The verb 勝つ has the valency が―に, whereby が marks the subject, and に the object: subjectが objectに 勝つ The antonym of 勝つ is 負ける, which also has a が―に valency. One ...


6

Little words like by and に have lots of uses. He was murdered by his own doctor! She was sitting by the tree enjoying the sun. I won the contest by cheating. She bills by the hour. In the first sentence, by is used for the agent of a passive clause. In the second sentence, by is used to express a location. In the third sentence, by is ...


6

First, a small list of grammar terms needed to read both OP's question and my reply. [自動詞]{じどうし} = intransitive verb [他動詞]{たどうし} = transitive verb [能動形]{のうどうけい} = active voice form [受身形]{うけみけい} = passive voice form Now, the phrases in question: 1) [夕焼]{ゆうや}けに[染]{そ}まる 2) 夕焼けに染められる OP says "自動詞 and 受身形" a few times, so it would not be a typo. ...


5

You are making a mistake lots of people make – you are trying to think about what your sentence will look like in English. You might do this with most European languages, but you definitively can't do this with Asian languages. So as you said, your first sentence is correct: 金曜日にケーキを食べる. Basically, all you did in your second sentence was indicate that ...


5

「Verb + に(or にも) + Same Verb in potential form + ず」 is a very common phrase pattern that expresses one's inability or hesitation to perform the action described by the verb. See 一-2 in: https://kotobank.jp/word/%E3%81%AB%E3%82%82-592921#E3.83.87.E3.82.B8.E3.82.BF.E3.83.AB.E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.B3.89 「[切]{き}り[出]{だ}すに切り出せず、[今日]{きょう}まできてしまいました。」 ...


4

Taking Actions at Specific Times: Plain and simple, what governs the particle choice for expressing the time of action is the part of speech that follows the particle -- nothing else. Use に with verbs: 「[一週間後]{いっしゅうかんご}に[解約]{かいやく}する」 = "to cancel after a week" 「5[月]{がつ}に[渡米]{とべい}します。」 = "I am going to the U.S. in May." 「2[年前]{ねんまえ}に[結婚]{けっこん}しました。」 ...


4

会社の帰りに usually means 会社から帰る時に, or 'on the way home (from the company)'. 帰り here is a noun meaning the way back or return, while 行【い】き means the opposite. 学校の行きと帰りに本を読む To read a book on the way to and from school


4

In this context, the 「~~に」 describes what the object of an action is -- "towards", "for", "regarding", etc. The action here is to have dreams. This 「に」 has the same meaning as 「~~に[対]{たい}して」. The 「~~とは」 means "from/than ~~" and is often following by a word like 「[違]{ちが}う」, 「[異]{こと}なる」, etc. to express "A is different from/than B." 「とは」 is an emphatic ...


3

IMPORTANT: I have provided a translation for each sentence, but DO NOT be reading my translations as you read my explanations. Instead, you should be looking at the original sentences in Japanese. Otherwise, some of the explanations might not make sense as it is not my translations that I am trying to explain. わたしは[旅行]{りょこう} に [行]{い}きません。 = "I am not ...


2

I think you can use へ or に more or less interchangeably in your examples without any real change in meaning, but に is probably the more common choice. 1a. 川の向こうへ渡る橋は一つしかありませんでした。 1b. 川の向こうに渡る橋は一つしかありませんでした。 2a. 友達とレストランへ行きます。 2b. 友達とレストランに行きます。 3a. 来月国へ帰ります。 3b. 来月国に帰ります。 Even if you use へ instead of に, you wouldn't be returning in ...


2

In the first place, "hanbaaga-ga" as in "hanbaaga-ga hoshii" is not the subject. So it doesn't mean a burger is wanted. Both the subject and the object of "hoshii" are indicated by ga, in other words, when you express "bobu-wa hanbaaga-ga hoshii" without any topicalized elements, it becomes "bobu-ga hanbaaga-ga hoshii". So, "who wants a burger" can be ...


2

Maybe the particle you chose, に (ni), is not quite right. ボブにハンバーガーが欲しい (bobu-ni hanbaaga-ga hoshii) and ハンバーガーがボブに欲しい (hanbaaga-ga bobu-ni hoshii) would mean something like "(I) want a burger for Bob". It's I or someone else, not Bob, that is the implicit wanter, and the wanter likes to give the burger to Bob. Of course we usually don't say things like ...


2

Semantically, it means 切り出したかったのに切り出せず. (切り出す = to broach (a topic)) [dictionary form of a verb] + に + [nai-form] + ない is an uncommon, emphatic, and literary set phrase which means "want to ~ but can't", "too bad/extraordinary to ~", etc. 泣くに泣けない状況 a situation too bad to cry 笑うに笑えない話 a story too extraordinary to laugh at この料理は食うに食えない this dish is ...


2

This is more of a grammatical construction where you have a verb in base form plus に followed by a negative potential form of the same verb. It basically means that for some prohibiting reason, you couldn't do ~~~ even if you wanted to. 終電を逃したから、帰るには帰れない。(Paraphrasing, "I missed the last train and I have no way to get home.") It looks like in the sentence ...


2

A verb is surely omitted here. What verb is it, then? Think about what you could do with a 「さよなら」 in quotation marks. You could either say it or hear it said to someone and that is about all you could do with a 「さよなら」, isn't it? (Of course, you could write it but writing 「さよなら」 on someone's back would not be too romantic, would it?) So, the omitted ...


2

Aの帰り means "on a way to my home from A", because 帰る not only means go back, but usually also mean go back to your home. 会社の帰りに本屋を寄るのが楽しみです means "I enjoy dropping by a bookstore on the way to go back my home from the company." The equivalent word of に in English is "at". You use に in this case because you drop by a bookstore "at" the moment you are going ...


2

I think you're actually asking about にする and not just に. に isn't a verb after all. It has a lot of uses, each probably worth a question of their own. Here are some definitions from Jisho.org: AをBにする to place, or raise, person A to a post or status B to transform A to B; to make A into B; to exchange A for B to make use of A for B; to view ...


2

They are different. AにXをみる means you find abstract things against something. For examples, その映画に人生の意味を見た (I found sense of the life in/out of the movie), その人にイエスを見た (I found Jesus in him/her) etc.


2

朝ご飯は何を食べましたか。 This is correct. You're literally saying, "As for breakfast, what did you eat?" 朝食に何を食べたのですか? Google is using the particle に to indicate at in a similar manner to that of 今週末に (this weekend), however, に is usually omitted for relative times. They're both grammatically correct. "At breakfast, what did you eat?"


2

The particle に, rather than を, appears because the valency of the verb 会う requires it. Instead of に, the particle と is also possible. English meet can appear with a bare object (I met him), or the preposition with (I met with him). While most valencies are constant across languages (most transitive Japanese verbs are also transitive verbs in English), there ...


2

The particle に is a "grammar" word, so it is not a good idea thinking of it as "meaning" any list of English words. For particular verbs, you have to learn "case-by-case" what particles it uses to hook to different types of object. (This is very like the way you just have to learn which preposition to use in French, or which case in languages like German or ...


2

After a bit of research I've tentatively convinced myself that this is the answer: わかります is acting as a passive verb 'to be known' rather than 'to know' or 'to understand'. In which case に is marking the agent of the action, so the sentence literally translates as 'the real young lord is known by me. Without に it would become 'I understand the real young ...


2

蚊に刺された does mean "I was bitten by a mosquito." Passives in general work like this: Active sentence: actor-GA patient-WO verb.stem-verb.inflection ⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓ Passive sentence: patient-GA actor-NI verb.stem-are-verb.inflection So in your case: Active sentence: ka-GA ...


2

わかる is a potential verb. Potential verbs sometimes take に or には to contrast or emphasize their subjects. So 私にはわかります means ‘I know it while others probably do not.’ Examples are; 彼にできることなら私にもできる。I can do what he can do. あなたに私の気持ちがわかる? Do you know how I feel? あの子には幽霊が見えるんだ。That kid sees ghosts (while we don't).


2

The particle "に" can fulfill many distinct grammatical functions. In this case, "に" does not mark a qualifier of time or place, but instead marks the agent/source of a passive verb. As such, it would usually be translated in English with the preposition "by": 私が刺された。 I was bitten/stung. 私が蚊に刺された。 I was bitten by a mosquito. See this page for an ...


1

Additional Info I've always thought that if you use ある, you have to use に. I learned recently that this is sometimes wrong. There's a case where using X に or X で depends on what X is. For example: Aセンターで大きなコンサートがある。○ Aセンターに大きなコンサートがある。▽ で is correct here because コンサート is an event. 5階建ビルにオフィスが5つある。(オフィス: Since an office is tangible, に is ...


1

For example the question could have been "what are you taking interests in" with "in" standing for に, this would be a suggestion for the answer: "In learning and in sports and also relationships." In this case you are summing up things you would use に after in a full sentence. 勉強に興味あります。



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