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10

This に is not a location marker. In this article about the particle に: Source "Ni" indicates an agent or a source in passive or causative verbs. It translates into "by" or "from". 母にしかられた。 I was scolded by my mother. トムに英語を教えてもらった。 I was taught English by Tom. The verb in question, 見つかる, is categorized as a passive-like verb ...


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There is no difference. Because 触る is intransitive, only に should technically be correct. However, the language has changed over time, and now you can find it with を sometimes.


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1)「ボクにもできる。」 2) "I can also do that." While those two sentences may be good "translations" for each other, they are structured very differently. It is, indeed, "translation" that often gets in the way of understanding things between the two languages. The English sentence clearly has a grammatical subject in "I", but the subject is unmentioned in ...


3

You got the wrong idea about what modifies what :) Look at this part closely: 食べられない物が入った可能性がある If you isolate this part, it becomes clear that it means "inedible things that may have gotten in"(or lit. "a possibility that inedible things got in"). 可能性がある means 可能性(possibility)+がある(exists), so it literally means "a possibility exists". Now let's add ...


2

You should understand it as "I'm mad/angry at that person." Like if you say 私に怒らないでよ!you're saying "well don't get mad at me about it!" And the other way around if you say お母さんに怒られた。it means mum got angry at me.


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"A does not affect B" is translated as "AはBに影響しない" and "AはBに影響を与えない" , so (1) is unnatural. (2) and (3) are different. (2) is translated as "A isn't affected by B".


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"~しに行く" = the 連用形(continuative form) of a verb + に行く and it means "go ~ing", so 見に行く = 見 (the 連用形 of 見る) + に行く. The "には" of "the 連体形(attributive form) of a verb + には" is used for the object of the action. For example, 車が走るには、ガソリンが必要です.


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私は無理です may be colloquially passable, but is logically incorrect, because you are saying “I am impossible” or “I am impossibility.” Clearly you are not “impossible” entity. 私には無理です means (そのことを行うのは)私には(私にとっては) 無理(なこと)です‐“It’s impossible (or difficult) for me (to do it), “ and sounds perfect to me. Japanese language is pretty loose in distinguishing noun and ...


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I am actually not sure if "僕は無理です” is technically incorrect grammar. I can imagine a group of people talking about whether that would ever climb a mountain, and one of them says "僕は。。。。やっぱり無理です”. As "〜は” can mean "as for ~", I don't see a major difference in meaning between 僕は and 僕には in this case. I would be interested to hear from any native speakers to ...


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I think you've answered it yourself: に gives the sense of "for". Consider "For me, it's impossible" vs. "Me, I'm [figuratively] impossible."



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