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39

This is really no different than the normal use of the scope/topic particle は, except that with には (and では, とは, and any other combination), the scope of the sentence expands to include the particle itself. (I will use "scope" to mean "topic" here; personally I prefer the former, but most people are used to the latter.) The example sentences you chose might ...


33

I've asked this very question in the past and my research led me to the following definition which (surprisingly) differs from every other answer here so far: ~となる expresses a discrete change, while ~になる can express either a discrete or a continuous change. You can feasibly use ~になる for everything, since it covers all cases, but in cases where you want to ...


33

に emphasizes the location へ emphasizes the direction まで emphasizes the process or journey


20

In general, で is where an action is performed and に is the "direction" toward/to/into which the result of an action happens. 部屋の中で泣いています → I'm crying in the room / "The place where I'm at while I'm crying is in the room" 部屋の中に泣いています → I'm crying into the room (meaning like, your tears are flowing from your face into the room). This doesn't make ...


16

What I have been taught in the college is that に is only used for verbs that imply motions which destination/position is required to be specified. For example, if you say "ikimasu" (I'm going), unless already in the context, you need to specify the destination otherwise the sentence does not make sense. So, you use "ni": "asoko ni ikimasu" On the other ...


12

的 makes 世界 into a 形容動詞 ("na-adjective"), which, when functioning as adverb, turns into ~的に. ~的では is simply ungrammatical.


11

There are some interesting connotations in the Chiebukuro examples crunchyt kindly pointed to which I think are worth going over in more detail. First, the ~でする and ~にする forms: この仕事はあとでします。 I'll do this job later. この仕事はあとにします。 I'll do this job later. Now, the fact that these are both allowable and both have the same (English) translation doesn't ...


11

As ssb and fefe wrote, the sentence consists of two clauses which share the main verb あります. In this particular case, it would be easier to read if the author put a 読点 (“、”) in the sentence: 白い箱はカウチの上に、緑のランプは机の上にあります。 However, unlike commas in English, 読点 in Japanese is rarely (if ever) grammatically required. Authors are free to use 読点 wherever they ...


10

Your question is about two different things: The usage of particle で and particle に to express place vs. action. The usage of particle は to highlight a matter in the sentence. Understanding particle で vs. particle に When you want to express where a certain action is taking place, you use particle で. Consider the following examples: 1a) My mom bought ...


10

This に is not a location marker. In this article about the particle に: Source "Ni" indicates an agent or a source in passive or causative verbs. It translates into "by" or "from". 母にしかられた。 I was scolded by my mother. トムに英語を教えてもらった。 I was taught English by Tom. The verb in question, 見つかる, is categorized as a passive-like verb ...


9

I looked the at the use of 感じる a few months ago. I came to the following conclusions: The verb is usually transitive (他動詞) ; it takes を with a noun (including embedded noun phrases with の)but It can also be intransitive (自動詞): Space ALC list it as both and give the example ~が退屈に感じる (feel bored [uninspired]) It can also take と to mark a ...


9

I think this person (maybe a musician) just means: セットリストに「適当!」って書いてます。笑 I just write 「適当!」("play without a plan!") on a set list. lol


9

There is a very subtle difference between the two--with に, the destination is more important; with へ, the journey is more important. You might use に if you want to say you're going "to the store" and へ if you want to say you're going "in the direction of the store [and ending up there]." Is there a lot of practical difference in how they are used? Not ...


9

Both 「[映画]{えいが}で[見]{み}る」 and 「映画に見る」 are correct and natural phrases but they have different meanings. 「映画で見る」 is the simpler and more often used of the two. If you saw a certain thing, place, actor, etc. in a movie, you 映画で those things を見た. Those tangible objects just physically appeared in the movie and you saw them. 「映画に見る」 is less often used and ...


9

Both are grammatically correct, but they have different meanings. お寺で名前を登録する means "to register their names at the temple". The temple happens to be where they registered their names. Their names will be recorded in the list which may or may not be managed by the temple itself. お寺に名前を登録する means "to register their names with the temple". It's clear that ...


8

This can depend on the arguments a verb takes. For example, いる uses に for location. かべでいる would make no sense. 書く takes an argument for something to be written on; 「壁に書く」 means "write on a wall", and 「壁で書く」 means "write at a wall". For the 泣く example, you really could use either one, but で may be clearer because 泣く can take an argument marked by に to ...


8

First, we can't make the blanket statement that 一緒で is always incorrect, only that it is incorrect in this particular case. Let's start by identifying how に is used here. In the case of 一緒に, に works the same way as in expressions like きれいに ("neatly", "prettily") and 気軽に ("casually"): it turns the preceding word into an adverb and shows how the action is ...


8

As Ignacio have said, the い-form (or the [連用形]{ren'yōkei} form) is used with に to indicate a purpose. 特別なビザをもらいに行った means you're going somewhere, and your purpose for going there is getting a special visa. 特別なビザをもらって行った, however, is quite incorrect. Indeed, ~て-form + いく can be used to make a compound verb that means "beginning from a certain point, to be in ...


8

In this type of sentence, まで means "all the way to ~" with emphasis on the journey. The question is asking which is faster to get to the airport, but in order to judge this, you have to consider the whole route. xref this post for more information.


7

The に you presented indicates purpose of going rather than a direction. Related: Is it true that only movement verbs can take [V-stem]に to express a purpose? Constituent parts: おばあさんは(The woman(topic))  川へ(in the direction of river)  せんたくしに(for the purpose of laundry)  でかけます(go out) Sentence: The woman goes out to the river to do laundry.


7

I agree with Amanda, a great question. To summarise with regard to 'time': "後で" means you are using the time you have later to do the action, whereas... "後に" implies you choose "later" from amongst other options (e.g. instead of 'now', 'never' or even 'undefined') for performing the action (i.e. eating). I found the answer here on Chiebukuro ...



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