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27

This is really no different than the normal use of the scope/topic particle は, except that with には (and では, とは, and any other combination), the scope of the sentence expands to include the particle itself. (I will use "scope" to mean "topic" here; personally I prefer the former, but most people are used to the latter.) The example sentences you chose might ...


23

I've asked this very question in the past and my research led me to the following definition which (surprisingly) differs from every other answer here so far: ~となる expresses a discrete change, while ~になる can express either a discrete or a continuous change. You can feasibly use ~になる for everything, since it covers all cases, but in cases where you want to ...


14

In general, で is where an action is performed and に is the "direction" toward/to/into which the result of an action happens. 部屋の中で泣いています → I'm crying in the room / "The place where I'm at while I'm crying is in the room" 部屋の中に泣いています → I'm crying into the room (meaning like, your tears are flowing from your face into the room). This doesn't make ...


13

What I have been taught in the college is that に is only used for verbs that imply motions which destination/position is required to be specified. For example, if you say "ikimasu" (I'm going), unless already in the context, you need to specify the destination otherwise the sentence does not make sense. So, you use "ni": "asoko ni ikimasu" On the other ...


10

There are some interesting connotations in the Chiebukuro examples crunchyt kindly pointed to which I think are worth going over in more detail. First, the ~でする and ~にする forms: この仕事はあとでします。 I'll do this job later. この仕事はあとにします。 I'll do this job later. Now, the fact that these are both allowable and both have the same (English) translation doesn't ...


10

You are making a big assumption which turns out to be false. That is, you are assuming that Word W1 which belongs to part-of-speech P in language L1 will always be translated to another word W2 of the same part-of-speech P in language L2. This turns out to be clearly false. For example, before is a preposition in English, but 前 is a noun in Japanese. ...


10

As ssb and fefe wrote, the sentence consists of two clauses which share the main verb あります. In this particular case, it would be easier to read if the author put a 読点 (“、”) in the sentence: 白い箱はカウチの上に、緑のランプは机の上にあります。 However, unlike commas in English, 読点 in Japanese is rarely (if ever) grammatically required. Authors are free to use 読点 wherever they ...


9

There is a very subtle difference between the two--with に, the destination is more important; with へ, the journey is more important. You might use に if you want to say you're going "to the store" and へ if you want to say you're going "in the direction of the store [and ending up there]." Is there a lot of practical difference in how they are used? Not ...


9

In this type of sentence, まで means "all the way to ~" with emphasis on the journey. The question is asking which is faster to get to the airport, but in order to judge this, you have to consider the whole route. xref this post for more information.


9

Your question is about two different things: The usage of particle で and particle に to express place vs. action. The usage of particle は to highlight a matter in the sentence. Understanding particle で vs. particle に When you want to express where a certain action is taking place, you use particle で. Consider the following examples: 1a) My mom bought ...


8

Using に in front of の to modify a noun is ungrammatical. ○ あの場所への行き方 × あの場所にの行き方 'the way to go to that place' If you are not modifying a noun, you can use either. ○ あの場所へ行く方法 ○ あの場所に行く方法 To answer rintaun's question below, when the noun is more of a recipient rather than just a destination, replacing に with へ will sound strange. △ ...


8

I agree with Chocolate's answer. The slight difference in nuance (for me, without strong basis) is this: Aにゆれる 'swing against A' 'swinging on its own as a reaction to A' Aでゆれる 'swing {by/due to} A' 'swinging, caused by A' に implies a slight spontaneity whereas で implies a strong cause-result relation. So when you say 風に揺れる, it implies ...


8

I looked the at the use of 感じる a few months ago. I came to the following conclusions: The verb is usually transitive (他動詞) ; it takes を with a noun (including embedded noun phrases with の)but It can also be intransitive (自動詞): Space ALC list it as both and give the example ~が退屈に感じる (feel bored [uninspired]) It can also take と to mark a ...


7

From what I have learned and observed, ~となる implies a "suppose if" conditional, something similar to "suppose if it is the case that [X] would become [Y] then" where as ~になる simply means "[X] becomes [Y]". 「請求書のお支払いは現金のみとなりますので、ご了承くださいませ。」 would mean something like "Suppose if you need to pay your purchase by cash, we hope to get your understanding.". This ...


7

で derives from に+て, and て roughly corresponds to the present/past participles (-ing, -en) in Western langauges. Kuno (1973) notices that て implies temporal order. So when you have 走ってころんだ '(By) running, I fell', running has to precede falling; it cannot be the other way around. This much is the general consensus. Notice that the usage of で in the ...


7

The に you presented indicates purpose of going rather than a direction. Related: Is it true that only movement verbs can take [V-stem]に to express a purpose? Constituent parts: おばあさんは(The woman(topic))  川へ(in the direction of river)  せんたくしに(for the purpose of laundry)  でかけます(go out) Sentence: The woman goes out to the river to do laundry.


7

I don't see much difference between: [家]{いえ}に[一人]{ひとり}です。and 家で一人です。 [今]{いま}、家に[独]{ひと}りぼっちです。and 今、家で独りぼっちです。 [今夜]{こんや}は[部屋]{へや}に一人きりだ。and 今夜は部屋で一人きりだ。 I think we tend to use で in daily conversation and に when we write when we use 一人だ/独りぼっちだ etc. to mean "alone/there's nobody else in the room/house". However, I see a slight difference between: ...


7

In a sense, yes, but に is the correct choice here. 受ける takes two objects, a "direct" and an "indirect" object. を marks the direct object, i.e. what is being received に marks the indirect object, i.e. from whom the direct object is being received を will not be translated at all, and に will be translated as "from". から, too, often means "from" but applies ...


6

As Ignacio have said, the い-form (or the [連用形]{ren'yōkei} form) is used with に to indicate a purpose. 特別なビザをもらいに行った means you're going somewhere, and your purpose for going there is getting a special visa. 特別なビザをもらって行った, however, is quite incorrect. Indeed, ~て-form + いく can be used to make a compound verb that means "beginning from a certain point, to be in ...


6

In English terms, when saying 左{ひだり}に曲{ま}がる you're saying "turn to the left", and when you say 左{ひだり}へ曲{ま}がる, you're simply saying, "turn left." Which, as Troyen pointed out in his comment, is still a little vague because the difference in English is also subtle. So much so that I have to concede that there is a fair amount of individual perception here on ...


6

I agree with Amanda, a great question. To summarise with regard to 'time': "後で" means you are using the time you have later to do the action, whereas... "後に" implies you choose "later" from amongst other options (e.g. instead of 'now', 'never' or even 'undefined') for performing the action (i.e. eating). I found the answer here on Chiebukuro ...


6

I think what's really going on here can be traced back to the two different ways 形容動詞 (けいようどうし: adjectival nouns or "な-adjectives") were inflected. If we look under the 連用形 (れんようけい: the "adverbial inflection", for lack of a better term) column under the first table on this Wikibooks page detailing Classical Japanese inflection patterns, we find the following ...


6

First, we can't make the blanket statement that 一緒で is always incorrect, only that it is incorrect in this particular case. Let's start by identifying how に is used here. In the case of 一緒に, に works the same way as in expressions like きれいに ("neatly", "prettily") and 気軽に ("casually"): it turns the preceding word into an adverb and shows how the action is ...


6

その中に would mean "to within that [selection of apartments]". Kind of nonsensical. その中で would mean "at within that [selection of apartments]". Also kind of nonsensical. その中から means "from within that [selection of apartments]". Clunky because literal translations are clunky, but the logic is there. The whole sentence: 私はその中から好きな家を借りました。 "I rented an ...


6

This is a great question, and one of which I'm not sure I fully understand the nuances. But here goes: What I learned in my first Japanese class was the は/が for basic things like this: あの人は日本語がわかる → That guy understands Japanese. 友達は子供が3人います → My friend has 3 children. だれがこれが出来るか → Who can do this? Then I heard some people start using に and ...


6

(The question was already essentially answered in comments by Chocolate and me, but I am posting an answer as an answer.) To answer the question literally, 試験に受かる (to pass an examination) is grammatical, but 試験が受かる is not grammatical, as Chocolate stated in her comment. But a more interesting part comes from your logic based on which you thought that ...


6

The reading as に to mark the agent of the passive construction is definitely syntactically possible, but a much more likely reading is the locative に, i.e. your second reading. Why is it に and not で? で marks a place where an action happens, に marks a place where something "exists". There is definitely some overlap in usage, but で in this case sounds strange ...


5

に and で can be confusing in other uses as well, but since the example is about location, I will focus on that. に: specifies a location into/toward which a movement takes place: 部屋に入る enter the room 学校に行く go to school specifies a location where something exists (used with verbs いる, ある and 住む, but not only). Focus is on existence, not action: 彼は部屋にいる ...



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